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-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-bisect.txt22
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-bundle.txt86
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-cat-file.txt18
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-check-attr.txt16
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-check-ref-format.txt40
5 files changed, 91 insertions, 91 deletions
diff --git a/Documentation/git-bisect.txt b/Documentation/git-bisect.txt
index 93d9fc0..ffc02c7 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-bisect.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-bisect.txt
@@ -81,7 +81,7 @@ will have been left with the first bad kernel revision in "refs/bisect/bad".
Bisect reset
~~~~~~~~~~~~
-To return to the original head after a bisect session, you issue the
+To return to the original head after a bisect session, issue the
following command:
------------------------------------------------
@@ -95,8 +95,8 @@ the bisection state).
Bisect visualize
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-To see the currently remaining suspects in 'gitk', the following command
-is issued during the bisection process:
+To see the currently remaining suspects in 'gitk', issue the following
+command during the bisection process:
------------
$ git bisect visualize
@@ -115,7 +115,7 @@ $ git bisect view --stat
Bisect log and bisect replay
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-After having marked revisions as good or bad, you issue the following
+After having marked revisions as good or bad, issue the following
command to show what has been done so far:
------------
@@ -135,7 +135,7 @@ $ git bisect replay that-file
Avoiding testing a commit
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-If in the middle of a bisect session, you know that the next suggested
+If, in the middle of a bisect session, you know that the next suggested
revision is not a good one to test (e.g. the change the commit
introduces is known not to work in your environment and you know it
does not have anything to do with the bug you are chasing), you may
@@ -151,8 +151,8 @@ $ git reset --hard HEAD~3 # try 3 revisions before what
# was suggested
------------
-Then compile and test the chosen revision. Afterwards the revision
-is marked as good or bad in the usual manner.
+Then compile and test the chosen revision, and afterwards mark
+the revision as good or bad in the usual manner.
Bisect skip
~~~~~~~~~~~~
@@ -175,8 +175,8 @@ using the "'<commit1>'..'<commit2>'" notation. For example:
$ git bisect skip v2.5..v2.6
------------
-The effect of this would be that no commit between `v2.5` excluded and
-`v2.6` included could be tested.
+This tells the bisect process that no commit after `v2.5`, up to and
+including `v2.6`, should be tested.
Note that if you also want to skip the first commit of the range you
would issue the command:
@@ -185,8 +185,8 @@ would issue the command:
$ git bisect skip v2.5 v2.5..v2.6
------------
-This would cause the commits between `v2.5` included and `v2.6` included
-to be skipped.
+This tells the bisect process that the commits between `v2.5` included
+and `v2.6` included should be skipped.
Cutting down bisection by giving more parameters to bisect start
diff --git a/Documentation/git-bundle.txt b/Documentation/git-bundle.txt
index 57590b1..aee7e4a 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-bundle.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-bundle.txt
@@ -19,13 +19,13 @@ DESCRIPTION
Some workflows require that one or more branches of development on one
machine be replicated on another machine, but the two machines cannot
-be directly connected so the interactive git protocols (git, ssh,
-rsync, http) cannot be used. This command provides support for
+be directly connected, and therefore the interactive git protocols (git,
+ssh, rsync, http) cannot be used. This command provides support for
'git-fetch' and 'git-pull' to operate by packaging objects and references
in an archive at the originating machine, then importing those into
another repository using 'git-fetch' and 'git-pull'
after moving the archive by some means (i.e., by sneakernet). As no
-direct connection between repositories exists, the user must specify a
+direct connection between the repositories exists, the user must specify a
basis for the bundle that is held by the destination repository: the
bundle assumes that all objects in the basis are already in the
destination repository.
@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ verify <file>::
bundle format itself as well as checking that the prerequisite
commits exist and are fully linked in the current repository.
'git-bundle' prints a list of missing commits, if any, and exits
- with non-zero status.
+ with a non-zero status.
list-heads <file>::
Lists the references defined in the bundle. If followed by a
@@ -53,14 +53,14 @@ list-heads <file>::
unbundle <file>::
Passes the objects in the bundle to 'git-index-pack'
for storage in the repository, then prints the names of all
- defined references. If a reflist is given, only references
- matching those in the given list are printed. This command is
+ defined references. If a list of references is given, only
+ references matching those in the list are printed. This command is
really plumbing, intended to be called only by 'git-fetch'.
[git-rev-list-args...]::
A list of arguments, acceptable to 'git-rev-parse' and
- 'git-rev-list', that specify the specific objects and references
- to transport. For example, "master~10..master" causes the
+ 'git-rev-list', that specifies the specific objects and references
+ to transport. For example, `master\~10..master` causes the
current master reference to be packaged along with all objects
added since its 10th ancestor commit. There is no explicit
limit to the number of references and objects that may be
@@ -71,24 +71,24 @@ unbundle <file>::
A list of references used to limit the references reported as
available. This is principally of use to 'git-fetch', which
expects to receive only those references asked for and not
- necessarily everything in the pack (in this case, 'git-bundle' is
- acting like 'git-fetch-pack').
+ necessarily everything in the pack (in this case, 'git-bundle' acts
+ like 'git-fetch-pack').
SPECIFYING REFERENCES
---------------------
'git-bundle' will only package references that are shown by
'git-show-ref': this includes heads, tags, and remote heads. References
-such as master~1 cannot be packaged, but are perfectly suitable for
+such as `master\~1` cannot be packaged, but are perfectly suitable for
defining the basis. More than one reference may be packaged, and more
than one basis can be specified. The objects packaged are those not
contained in the union of the given bases. Each basis can be
-specified explicitly (e.g., ^master~10), or implicitly (e.g.,
-master~10..master, --since=10.days.ago master).
+specified explicitly (e.g. `^master\~10`), or implicitly (e.g.
+`master\~10..master`, `--since=10.days.ago master`).
It is very important that the basis used be held by the destination.
-It is okay to err on the side of conservatism, causing the bundle file
-to contain objects already in the destination as these are ignored
+It is okay to err on the side of caution, causing the bundle file
+to contain objects already in the destination, as these are ignored
when unpacking at the destination.
EXAMPLE
@@ -97,13 +97,13 @@ EXAMPLE
Assume you want to transfer the history from a repository R1 on machine A
to another repository R2 on machine B.
For whatever reason, direct connection between A and B is not allowed,
-but we can move data from A to B via some mechanism (CD, email, etc).
-We want to update R2 with developments made on branch master in R1.
+but we can move data from A to B via some mechanism (CD, email, etc.).
+We want to update R2 with development made on the branch master in R1.
-To bootstrap the process, you can first create a bundle that doesn't have
-any basis. You can use a tag to remember up to what commit you sent out
-in order to make it easy to later update the other repository with
-incremental bundle,
+To bootstrap the process, you can first create a bundle that does not have
+any basis. You can use a tag to remember up to what commit you last
+processed, in order to make it easy to later update the other repository
+with an incremental bundle:
----------------
machineA$ cd R1
@@ -111,17 +111,17 @@ machineA$ git bundle create file.bundle master
machineA$ git tag -f lastR2bundle master
----------------
-Then you sneakernet file.bundle to the target machine B. Because you don't
-have to have any object to extract objects from such a bundle, not only
-you can fetch/pull from a bundle, you can clone from it as if it was a
-remote repository.
+Then you transfer file.bundle to the target machine B. If you are creating
+the repository on machine B, then you can clone from the bundle as if it
+were a remote repository instead of creating an empty repository and then
+pulling or fetching objects from the bundle:
----------------
machineB$ git clone /home/me/tmp/file.bundle R2
----------------
This will define a remote called "origin" in the resulting repository that
-lets you fetch and pull from the bundle. $GIT_DIR/config file in R2 may
+lets you fetch and pull from the bundle. The $GIT_DIR/config file in R2 will
have an entry like this:
------------------------
@@ -130,12 +130,12 @@ have an entry like this:
fetch = refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*
------------------------
-You can fetch/pull to update the resulting mine.git repository after
-replacing the bundle you store at /home/me/tmp/file.bundle with incremental
-updates from here on.
+To update the resulting mine.git repository, you can fetch or pull after
+replacing the bundle stored at /home/me/tmp/file.bundle with incremental
+updates.
-After working more in the original repository, you can create an
-incremental bundle to update the other:
+After working some more in the original repository, you can create an
+incremental bundle to update the other repository:
----------------
machineA$ cd R1
@@ -143,8 +143,8 @@ machineA$ git bundle create file.bundle lastR2bundle..master
machineA$ git tag -f lastR2bundle master
----------------
-and sneakernet it to the other machine to replace /home/me/tmp/file.bundle,
-and pull from it.
+You then transfer the bundle to the other machine to replace
+/home/me/tmp/file.bundle, and pull from it.
----------------
machineB$ cd R2
@@ -152,49 +152,49 @@ machineB$ git pull
----------------
If you know up to what commit the intended recipient repository should
-have the necessary objects for, you can use that knowledge to specify the
+have the necessary objects, you can use that knowledge to specify the
basis, giving a cut-off point to limit the revisions and objects that go
in the resulting bundle. The previous example used lastR2bundle tag
-for this purpose, but you can use other options you would give to
+for this purpose, but you can use any other options that you would give to
the linkgit:git-log[1] command. Here are more examples:
-You can use a tag that is present in both.
+You can use a tag that is present in both:
----------------
$ git bundle create mybundle v1.0.0..master
----------------
-You can use a basis based on time.
+You can use a basis based on time:
----------------
$ git bundle create mybundle --since=10.days master
----------------
-Or you can use the number of commits.
+You can use the number of commits:
----------------
$ git bundle create mybundle -10 master
----------------
You can run `git-bundle verify` to see if you can extract from a bundle
-that was created with a basis.
+that was created with a basis:
----------------
$ git bundle verify mybundle
----------------
This will list what commits you must have in order to extract from the
-bundle and will error out if you don't have them.
+bundle and will error out if you do not have them.
A bundle from a recipient repository's point of view is just like a
-regular repository it fetches/pulls from. You can for example map
-refs, like this example, when fetching:
+regular repository which it fetches or pulls from. You can, for example, map
+references when fetching:
----------------
$ git fetch mybundle master:localRef
----------------
-Or see what refs it offers.
+You can also see what references it offers.
----------------
$ git ls-remote mybundle
diff --git a/Documentation/git-cat-file.txt b/Documentation/git-cat-file.txt
index 668f697..b191276 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-cat-file.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-cat-file.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-cat-file(1)
NAME
----
-git-cat-file - Provide content or type/size information for repository objects
+git-cat-file - Provide content or type and size information for repository objects
SYNOPSIS
@@ -14,19 +14,19 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-In the first form, provides content or type of objects in the repository. The
-type is required unless '-t' or '-p' is used to find the object type, or '-s'
-is used to find the object size.
+In its first form, the command provides the content or the type of an object in
+the repository. The type is required unless '-t' or '-p' is used to find the
+object type, or '-s' is used to find the object size.
-In the second form, a list of object (separated by LFs) is provided on stdin,
-and the SHA1, type, and size of each object is printed on stdout.
+In the second form, a list of objects (separated by linefeeds) is provided on
+stdin, and the SHA1, type, and size of each object is printed on stdout.
OPTIONS
-------
<object>::
The name of the object to show.
For a more complete list of ways to spell object names, see
- "SPECIFYING REVISIONS" section in linkgit:git-rev-parse[1].
+ the "SPECIFYING REVISIONS" section in linkgit:git-rev-parse[1].
-t::
Instead of the content, show the object type identified by
@@ -56,8 +56,8 @@ OPTIONS
stdin. May not be combined with any other options or arguments.
--batch-check::
- Print the SHA1, type, and size of each object provided on stdin. May not be
- combined with any other options or arguments.
+ Print the SHA1, type, and size of each object provided on stdin. May not
+ be combined with any other options or arguments.
OUTPUT
------
diff --git a/Documentation/git-check-attr.txt b/Documentation/git-check-attr.txt
index 8c2ac12..50824e3 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-check-attr.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-check-attr.txt
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-For every pathname, this command will list if each attr is 'unspecified',
+For every pathname, this command will list if each attribute is 'unspecified',
'set', or 'unset' as a gitattribute on that pathname.
OPTIONS
@@ -23,11 +23,11 @@ OPTIONS
Read file names from stdin instead of from the command-line.
-z::
- Only meaningful with `--stdin`; paths are separated with
- NUL character instead of LF.
+ Only meaningful with `--stdin`; paths are separated with a
+ NUL character instead of a linefeed character.
\--::
- Interpret all preceding arguments as attributes, and all following
+ Interpret all preceding arguments as attributes and all following
arguments as path names. If not supplied, only the first argument will
be treated as an attribute.
@@ -37,12 +37,12 @@ OUTPUT
The output is of the form:
<path> COLON SP <attribute> COLON SP <info> LF
-Where <path> is the path of a file being queried, <attribute> is an attribute
+<path> is the path of a file being queried, <attribute> is an attribute
being queried and <info> can be either:
'unspecified';; when the attribute is not defined for the path.
-'unset';; when the attribute is defined to false.
-'set';; when the attribute is defined to true.
+'unset';; when the attribute is defined as false.
+'set';; when the attribute is defined as true.
<value>;; when a value has been assigned to the attribute.
EXAMPLES
@@ -69,7 +69,7 @@ org/example/MyClass.java: diff: java
org/example/MyClass.java: myAttr: set
---------------
-* Listing attribute for multiple files:
+* Listing an attribute for multiple files:
---------------
$ git check-attr myAttr -- org/example/MyClass.java org/example/NoMyAttr.java
org/example/MyClass.java: myAttr: set
diff --git a/Documentation/git-check-ref-format.txt b/Documentation/git-check-ref-format.txt
index 034223c..171b683 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-check-ref-format.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-check-ref-format.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-check-ref-format(1)
NAME
----
-git-check-ref-format - Make sure ref name is well formed
+git-check-ref-format - Ensures that a reference name is well formed
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -11,40 +11,40 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-Checks if a given 'refname' is acceptable, and exits non-zero if
-it is not.
+Checks if a given 'refname' is acceptable, and exits with a non-zero
+status if it is not.
A reference is used in git to specify branches and tags. A
-branch head is stored under `$GIT_DIR/refs/heads` directory, and
-a tag is stored under `$GIT_DIR/refs/tags` directory. git
-imposes the following rules on how refs are named:
+branch head is stored under the `$GIT_DIR/refs/heads` directory, and
+a tag is stored under the `$GIT_DIR/refs/tags` directory. git
+imposes the following rules on how references are named:
-. It can include slash `/` for hierarchical (directory)
+. They can include slash `/` for hierarchical (directory)
grouping, but no slash-separated component can begin with a
- dot `.`;
+ dot `.`.
-. It cannot have two consecutive dots `..` anywhere;
+. They cannot have two consecutive dots `..` anywhere.
-. It cannot have ASCII control character (i.e. bytes whose
+. They cannot have ASCII control characters (i.e. bytes whose
values are lower than \040, or \177 `DEL`), space, tilde `~`,
caret `{caret}`, colon `:`, question-mark `?`, asterisk `*`,
- or open bracket `[` anywhere;
+ or open bracket `[` anywhere.
-. It cannot end with a slash `/`.
+. They cannot end with a slash `/`.
-These rules makes it easy for shell script based tools to parse
-refnames, pathname expansion by the shell when a refname is used
+These rules make it easy for shell script based tools to parse
+reference names, pathname expansion by the shell when a reference name is used
unquoted (by mistake), and also avoids ambiguities in certain
-refname expressions (see linkgit:git-rev-parse[1]). Namely:
+reference name expressions (see linkgit:git-rev-parse[1]):
-. double-dot `..` are often used as in `ref1..ref2`, and in some
- context this notation means `{caret}ref1 ref2` (i.e. not in
- ref1 and in ref2).
+. A double-dot `..` is often used as in `ref1..ref2`, and in some
+ contexts this notation means `{caret}ref1 ref2` (i.e. not in
+ `ref1` and in `ref2`).
-. tilde `~` and caret `{caret}` are used to introduce postfix
+. A tilde `~` and caret `{caret}` are used to introduce the postfix
'nth parent' and 'peel onion' operation.
-. colon `:` is used as in `srcref:dstref` to mean "use srcref\'s
+. A colon `:` is used as in `srcref:dstref` to mean "use srcref\'s
value and store it in dstref" in fetch and push operations.
It may also be used to select a specific object such as with
'git-cat-file': "git cat-file blob v1.3.3:refs.c".