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authorLinus Torvalds <torvalds@g5.osdl.org>2005-07-23 17:01:49 (GMT)
committerLinus Torvalds <torvalds@g5.osdl.org>2005-07-23 17:01:49 (GMT)
commit4311d328fee11fbd80862e3c5de06a26a0e80046 (patch)
tree0c6727da4f1a0ab0d81beba8348235029da6601f /debian
parenta692b9656a7975b933fde40cdd6319f9ca898a29 (diff)
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Be more aggressive about marking trees uninteresting
We'll mark all the trees at the edges (as deep as we had to go to realize that we have all the commits needed) as uninteresting. Otherwise we'll occasionally list a lot of objects that were actually available at the edge in a commit that we just never ended up parsing because we could determine early that we had all relevant commits. NOTE! The object listing is still just a _heuristic_. It's guaranteed to list a superset of the actual new objects, but there might be the occasional old object in the list, just because the commit that referenced it was much further back in the history. For example, let's say that a recent commit is a revert of part of the tree to much older state: since we didn't walk _that_ far back in the commit history tree to list the commits necessary, git-rev-tree will never have marked the old objects uninteresting, and we'll end up listing them as "new". That's ok.
Diffstat (limited to 'debian')
0 files changed, 0 insertions, 0 deletions