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authorSteffen Prohaska <prohaska@zib.de>2015-01-04 10:54:47 (GMT)
committerJunio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>2015-01-06 23:03:52 (GMT)
commite0a1f0931312f3eab8134ada4487216eafd8fd30 (patch)
tree976e6097220607082684d4a52543cc4e1907f25c /contrib/subtree
parentc2e8e4b9da4d007b15faa2e3d407b2fd279f0572 (diff)
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subtree: fix AsciiDoc list item continuation
List items must be continued with '+' (see [asciidoc]). [asciidoc] AsciiDoc user guide 17.7. List Item Continuation <http://www.methods.co.nz/asciidoc/userguide.html#X15> Signed-off-by: Steffen Prohaska <prohaska@zib.de> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
Diffstat (limited to 'contrib/subtree')
-rw-r--r--contrib/subtree/git-subtree.txt194
1 files changed, 89 insertions, 105 deletions
diff --git a/contrib/subtree/git-subtree.txt b/contrib/subtree/git-subtree.txt
index 8272100..54e4b4a 100644
--- a/contrib/subtree/git-subtree.txt
+++ b/contrib/subtree/git-subtree.txt
@@ -81,12 +81,11 @@ merge::
changes into the latest <commit>. With '--squash',
creates only one commit that contains all the changes,
rather than merging in the entire history.
-
- If you use '--squash', the merge direction doesn't
- always have to be forward; you can use this command to
- go back in time from v2.5 to v2.4, for example. If your
- merge introduces a conflict, you can resolve it in the
- usual ways.
++
+If you use '--squash', the merge direction doesn't always have to be
+forward; you can use this command to go back in time from v2.5 to v2.4,
+for example. If your merge introduces a conflict, you can resolve it in
+the usual ways.
pull::
Exactly like 'merge', but parallels 'git pull' in that
@@ -107,21 +106,19 @@ split::
contents of <prefix> at the root of the project instead
of in a subdirectory. Thus, the newly created history
is suitable for export as a separate git repository.
-
- After splitting successfully, a single commit id is
- printed to stdout. This corresponds to the HEAD of the
- newly created tree, which you can manipulate however you
- want.
-
- Repeated splits of exactly the same history are
- guaranteed to be identical (i.e. to produce the same
- commit ids). Because of this, if you add new commits
- and then re-split, the new commits will be attached as
- commits on top of the history you generated last time,
- so 'git merge' and friends will work as expected.
-
- Note that if you use '--squash' when you merge, you
- should usually not just '--rejoin' when you split.
++
+After splitting successfully, a single commit id is printed to stdout.
+This corresponds to the HEAD of the newly created tree, which you can
+manipulate however you want.
++
+Repeated splits of exactly the same history are guaranteed to be
+identical (i.e. to produce the same commit ids). Because of this, if
+you add new commits and then re-split, the new commits will be attached
+as commits on top of the history you generated last time, so 'git merge'
+and friends will work as expected.
++
+Note that if you use '--squash' when you merge, you should usually not
+just '--rejoin' when you split.
OPTIONS
@@ -151,109 +148,96 @@ OPTIONS FOR add, merge, push, pull
--squash::
This option is only valid for add, merge, push and pull
commands.
-
- Instead of merging the entire history from the subtree
- project, produce only a single commit that contains all
- the differences you want to merge, and then merge that
- new commit into your project.
-
- Using this option helps to reduce log clutter. People
- rarely want to see every change that happened between
- v1.0 and v1.1 of the library they're using, since none of the
- interim versions were ever included in their application.
-
- Using '--squash' also helps avoid problems when the same
- subproject is included multiple times in the same
- project, or is removed and then re-added. In such a
- case, it doesn't make sense to combine the histories
- anyway, since it's unclear which part of the history
- belongs to which subtree.
-
- Furthermore, with '--squash', you can switch back and
- forth between different versions of a subtree, rather
- than strictly forward. 'git subtree merge --squash'
- always adjusts the subtree to match the exactly
- specified commit, even if getting to that commit would
- require undoing some changes that were added earlier.
-
- Whether or not you use '--squash', changes made in your
- local repository remain intact and can be later split
- and send upstream to the subproject.
++
+Instead of merging the entire history from the subtree project, produce
+only a single commit that contains all the differences you want to
+merge, and then merge that new commit into your project.
++
+Using this option helps to reduce log clutter. People rarely want to see
+every change that happened between v1.0 and v1.1 of the library they're
+using, since none of the interim versions were ever included in their
+application.
++
+Using '--squash' also helps avoid problems when the same subproject is
+included multiple times in the same project, or is removed and then
+re-added. In such a case, it doesn't make sense to combine the
+histories anyway, since it's unclear which part of the history belongs
+to which subtree.
++
+Furthermore, with '--squash', you can switch back and forth between
+different versions of a subtree, rather than strictly forward. 'git
+subtree merge --squash' always adjusts the subtree to match the exactly
+specified commit, even if getting to that commit would require undoing
+some changes that were added earlier.
++
+Whether or not you use '--squash', changes made in your local repository
+remain intact and can be later split and send upstream to the
+subproject.
OPTIONS FOR split
-----------------
--annotate=<annotation>::
This option is only valid for the split command.
-
- When generating synthetic history, add <annotation> as a
- prefix to each commit message. Since we're creating new
- commits with the same commit message, but possibly
- different content, from the original commits, this can help
- to differentiate them and avoid confusion.
-
- Whenever you split, you need to use the same
- <annotation>, or else you don't have a guarantee that
- the new re-created history will be identical to the old
- one. That will prevent merging from working correctly.
- git subtree tries to make it work anyway, particularly
- if you use --rejoin, but it may not always be effective.
++
+When generating synthetic history, add <annotation> as a prefix to each
+commit message. Since we're creating new commits with the same commit
+message, but possibly different content, from the original commits, this
+can help to differentiate them and avoid confusion.
++
+Whenever you split, you need to use the same <annotation>, or else you
+don't have a guarantee that the new re-created history will be identical
+to the old one. That will prevent merging from working correctly. git
+subtree tries to make it work anyway, particularly if you use --rejoin,
+but it may not always be effective.
-b <branch>::
--branch=<branch>::
This option is only valid for the split command.
-
- After generating the synthetic history, create a new
- branch called <branch> that contains the new history.
- This is suitable for immediate pushing upstream.
- <branch> must not already exist.
++
+After generating the synthetic history, create a new branch called
+<branch> that contains the new history. This is suitable for immediate
+pushing upstream. <branch> must not already exist.
--ignore-joins::
This option is only valid for the split command.
-
- If you use '--rejoin', git subtree attempts to optimize
- its history reconstruction to generate only the new
- commits since the last '--rejoin'. '--ignore-join'
- disables this behaviour, forcing it to regenerate the
- entire history. In a large project, this can take a
- long time.
++
+If you use '--rejoin', git subtree attempts to optimize its history
+reconstruction to generate only the new commits since the last
+'--rejoin'. '--ignore-join' disables this behaviour, forcing it to
+regenerate the entire history. In a large project, this can take a long
+time.
--onto=<onto>::
This option is only valid for the split command.
-
- If your subtree was originally imported using something
- other than git subtree, its history may not match what
- git subtree is expecting. In that case, you can specify
- the commit id <onto> that corresponds to the first
- revision of the subproject's history that was imported
- into your project, and git subtree will attempt to build
- its history from there.
-
- If you used 'git subtree add', you should never need
- this option.
++
+If your subtree was originally imported using something other than git
+subtree, its history may not match what git subtree is expecting. In
+that case, you can specify the commit id <onto> that corresponds to the
+first revision of the subproject's history that was imported into your
+project, and git subtree will attempt to build its history from there.
++
+If you used 'git subtree add', you should never need this option.
--rejoin::
This option is only valid for the split command.
-
- After splitting, merge the newly created synthetic
- history back into your main project. That way, future
- splits can search only the part of history that has
- been added since the most recent --rejoin.
-
- If your split commits end up merged into the upstream
- subproject, and then you want to get the latest upstream
- version, this will allow git's merge algorithm to more
- intelligently avoid conflicts (since it knows these
- synthetic commits are already part of the upstream
- repository).
-
- Unfortunately, using this option results in 'git log'
- showing an extra copy of every new commit that was
- created (the original, and the synthetic one).
-
- If you do all your merges with '--squash', don't use
- '--rejoin' when you split, because you don't want the
- subproject's history to be part of your project anyway.
++
+After splitting, merge the newly created synthetic history back into
+your main project. That way, future splits can search only the part of
+history that has been added since the most recent --rejoin.
++
+If your split commits end up merged into the upstream subproject, and
+then you want to get the latest upstream version, this will allow git's
+merge algorithm to more intelligently avoid conflicts (since it knows
+these synthetic commits are already part of the upstream repository).
++
+Unfortunately, using this option results in 'git log' showing an extra
+copy of every new commit that was created (the original, and the
+synthetic one).
++
+If you do all your merges with '--squash', don't use '--rejoin' when you
+split, because you don't want the subproject's history to be part of
+your project anyway.
EXAMPLE 1. Add command