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authorJohannes Schindelin <johannes.schindelin@gmx.de>2019-01-29 14:19:31 (GMT)
committerJunio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>2019-01-29 17:26:46 (GMT)
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parent2e90484eb4ad0eb4334a94ba5ae401a293870e3a (diff)
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ci: use git-sdk-64-minimal build artifact
Instead of a shallow fetch followed by a sparse checkout, we are better off by using a separate, dedicated Pipeline that bundles the SDK as a build artifact, and then consuming that build artifact here. In fact, since this artifact will be used a lot, we spent substantial time on figuring out a minimal subset of the Git for Windows SDK, just enough to build and test Git. The result is a size reduction from around 1GB (compressed) to around 55MB (compressed). This also comes with the change where we now call `usr\bin\bash.exe` directly, as `git-cmd.exe` is not included in the minimal SDK. That reduces the time to initialize Git for Windows' SDK from anywhere between 2m30s-7m to a little over 1m. Note: in theory, we could also use the DownloadBuildArtifacts@0 task here. However, restricted permissions that are in effect when building from forks would let this fail for PR builds, defeating the whole purpose of the Azure Pipelines support for git.git. Signed-off-by: Johannes Schindelin <johannes.schindelin@gmx.de> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
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