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authorJeff King <peff@peff.net>2017-01-27 22:05:36 (GMT)
committerJunio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>2017-01-28 00:25:16 (GMT)
commit42b766d765feb2e0867954eb665ff05e3441b547 (patch)
tree879e7bbabb63619a5d6fefee4c82fc23cf15a1a4 /builtin/pack-objects.c
parent7dbabbbebe3ae047841690d035f302313a8fe51e (diff)
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pack-objects: convert recursion to iteration in break_delta_chain()
The break_delta_chain() function is recursive over the depth of a given delta chain, which can lead to possibly running out of stack space. Normally delta depth is quite small, but if there _is_ a pathological case, this is where we would find and fix it, so we should be more careful. We can do it without recursion at all, but there's a little bit of cleverness needed to do so. It's easiest to explain by covering the less-clever strategies first. The obvious thing to try is just keeping our own stack on the heap. Whenever we would recurse, push the new entry onto the stack and loop instead. But this gets tricky; when we see an ACTIVE entry, we need to care if we just pushed it (in which case it's a cycle) or if we just popped it (in which case we dealt with its bases, and no we need to clear the ACTIVE flag and compute its depth). You can hack around that in various ways, like keeping a "just pushed" flag, but the logic gets muddled. However, we can observe that we do all of our pushes first, and then all of our pops afterwards. In other words, we can do this in two passes. First dig down to the base, stopping when we see a cycle, and pushing each item onto our stack. Then pop the stack elements, clearing the ACTIVE flag and computing the depth for each. This works, and is reasonably elegant. However, why do we need the stack for the second pass? We can just walk the delta pointers again. There's one complication. Popping the stack went over our list in reverse, so we could compute the depth of each entry by incrementing the depth of its base, which we will have just computed. To go forward in the second pass, we have to compute the total depth on the way down, and then assign it as we go. This patch implements this final strategy, because it not only keeps the memory off the stack, but it eliminates it entirely. Credit for the cleverness in that approach goes to Michael Haggerty; bugs are mine. Signed-off-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
Diffstat (limited to 'builtin/pack-objects.c')
-rw-r--r--builtin/pack-objects.c129
1 files changed, 99 insertions, 30 deletions
diff --git a/builtin/pack-objects.c b/builtin/pack-objects.c
index 5c42a1d..6deae64 100644
--- a/builtin/pack-objects.c
+++ b/builtin/pack-objects.c
@@ -1581,48 +1581,117 @@ static void drop_reused_delta(struct object_entry *entry)
*/
static void break_delta_chains(struct object_entry *entry)
{
- /* If it's not a delta, it can't be part of a cycle. */
- if (!entry->delta) {
- entry->dfs_state = DFS_DONE;
- return;
- }
+ /*
+ * The actual depth of each object we will write is stored as an int,
+ * as it cannot exceed our int "depth" limit. But before we break
+ * changes based no that limit, we may potentially go as deep as the
+ * number of objects, which is elsewhere bounded to a uint32_t.
+ */
+ uint32_t total_depth;
+ struct object_entry *cur, *next;
+
+ for (cur = entry, total_depth = 0;
+ cur;
+ cur = cur->delta, total_depth++) {
+ if (cur->dfs_state == DFS_DONE) {
+ /*
+ * We've already seen this object and know it isn't
+ * part of a cycle. We do need to append its depth
+ * to our count.
+ */
+ total_depth += cur->depth;
+ break;
+ }
- switch (entry->dfs_state) {
- case DFS_NONE:
/*
- * This is the first time we've seen the object. We mark it as
- * part of the active potential cycle and recurse.
+ * We break cycles before looping, so an ACTIVE state (or any
+ * other cruft which made its way into the state variable)
+ * is a bug.
*/
- entry->dfs_state = DFS_ACTIVE;
- break_delta_chains(entry->delta);
+ if (cur->dfs_state != DFS_NONE)
+ die("BUG: confusing delta dfs state in first pass: %d",
+ cur->dfs_state);
/*
- * Once we've recursed, our base (if we still have one) knows
- * its depth, so we can compute ours (and check it against
- * the limit).
+ * Now we know this is the first time we've seen the object. If
+ * it's not a delta, we're done traversing, but we'll mark it
+ * done to save time on future traversals.
*/
- if (entry->delta) {
- entry->depth = entry->delta->depth + 1;
- if (entry->depth > depth)
- drop_reused_delta(entry);
+ if (!cur->delta) {
+ cur->dfs_state = DFS_DONE;
+ break;
}
- entry->dfs_state = DFS_DONE;
- break;
+ /*
+ * Mark ourselves as active and see if the next step causes
+ * us to cycle to another active object. It's important to do
+ * this _before_ we loop, because it impacts where we make the
+ * cut, and thus how our total_depth counter works.
+ * E.g., We may see a partial loop like:
+ *
+ * A -> B -> C -> D -> B
+ *
+ * Cutting B->C breaks the cycle. But now the depth of A is
+ * only 1, and our total_depth counter is at 3. The size of the
+ * error is always one less than the size of the cycle we
+ * broke. Commits C and D were "lost" from A's chain.
+ *
+ * If we instead cut D->B, then the depth of A is correct at 3.
+ * We keep all commits in the chain that we examined.
+ */
+ cur->dfs_state = DFS_ACTIVE;
+ if (cur->delta->dfs_state == DFS_ACTIVE) {
+ drop_reused_delta(cur);
+ cur->dfs_state = DFS_DONE;
+ break;
+ }
+ }
- case DFS_DONE:
- /* object already examined, and not part of a cycle */
- break;
+ /*
+ * And now that we've gone all the way to the bottom of the chain, we
+ * need to clear the active flags and set the depth fields as
+ * appropriate. Unlike the loop above, which can quit when it drops a
+ * delta, we need to keep going to look for more depth cuts. So we need
+ * an extra "next" pointer to keep going after we reset cur->delta.
+ */
+ for (cur = entry; cur; cur = next) {
+ next = cur->delta;
- case DFS_ACTIVE:
/*
- * We found a cycle that needs broken. It would be correct to
- * break any link in the chain, but it's convenient to
- * break this one.
+ * We should have a chain of zero or more ACTIVE states down to
+ * a final DONE. We can quit after the DONE, because either it
+ * has no bases, or we've already handled them in a previous
+ * call.
*/
- drop_reused_delta(entry);
- entry->dfs_state = DFS_DONE;
- break;
+ if (cur->dfs_state == DFS_DONE)
+ break;
+ else if (cur->dfs_state != DFS_ACTIVE)
+ die("BUG: confusing delta dfs state in second pass: %d",
+ cur->dfs_state);
+
+ /*
+ * If the total_depth is more than depth, then we need to snip
+ * the chain into two or more smaller chains that don't exceed
+ * the maximum depth. Most of the resulting chains will contain
+ * (depth + 1) entries (i.e., depth deltas plus one base), and
+ * the last chain (i.e., the one containing entry) will contain
+ * whatever entries are left over, namely
+ * (total_depth % (depth + 1)) of them.
+ *
+ * Since we are iterating towards decreasing depth, we need to
+ * decrement total_depth as we go, and we need to write to the
+ * entry what its final depth will be after all of the
+ * snipping. Since we're snipping into chains of length (depth
+ * + 1) entries, the final depth of an entry will be its
+ * original depth modulo (depth + 1). Any time we encounter an
+ * entry whose final depth is supposed to be zero, we snip it
+ * from its delta base, thereby making it so.
+ */
+ cur->depth = (total_depth--) % (depth + 1);
+ if (!cur->depth)
+ drop_reused_delta(cur);
+
+ cur->dfs_state = DFS_DONE;
}
}