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authorJunio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>2005-07-16 03:56:12 (GMT)
committerLinus Torvalds <torvalds@g5.osdl.org>2005-07-16 04:53:22 (GMT)
commita232a132eab77815a5f2662e8c064de0d956e553 (patch)
tree84722763529517668588503631574b634200e63e /Documentation
parent2c38fe4c574812601c8338d8db1ba0d2528b5ae4 (diff)
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[PATCH] Documentation: update recommended workflow when working with others.
Clarify that the hierarchy implied by the recommended workflow is only informal. Refer readers to nice illustration by Randy Dunlap. Separate out the step to "push" to own public repository in the workflow. Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
Diffstat (limited to 'Documentation')
-rw-r--r--Documentation/tutorial.txt61
1 files changed, 42 insertions, 19 deletions
diff --git a/Documentation/tutorial.txt b/Documentation/tutorial.txt
index b3f30ae..8088fd3 100644
--- a/Documentation/tutorial.txt
+++ b/Documentation/tutorial.txt
@@ -967,7 +967,19 @@ unpacked in the destination, unless rsync transport is used.
Working with Others
-------------------
-A recommended work cycle for a "project lead" is like this:
+Although git is a truly distributed system, it is often
+convenient to organize your project with an informal hierarchy
+of developers. Linux kernel development is run this way. There
+is a nice illustration (page 17, "Merges to Mainline") in Randy
+Dunlap's presentation (http://tinyurl.com/a2jdg).
+
+It should be stressed that this hierarchy is purely "informal".
+There is nothing fundamental in git that enforces the "chain of
+patch flow" this hierarchy implies. You do not have to pull
+from only one remote repository.
+
+
+A recommended workflow for a "project lead" goes like this:
(1) Prepare your primary repository on your local machine. Your
work is done there.
@@ -978,23 +990,28 @@ A recommended work cycle for a "project lead" is like this:
repository.
(4) "git repack" the public repository. This establishes a big
- pack that contains the initial set of objects.
+ pack that contains the initial set of objects as the
+ baseline, and possibly "git prune-packed" if the transport
+ used for pulling from your repository supports packed
+ repositories.
- (5) Keep working in your primary repository, and push your
- changes to the public repository. Your changes include
- your own, patches you receive via e-mail, and merge resulting
- from pulling the "public" repositories of your "subsystem
- maintainers".
+ (5) Keep working in your primary repository. Your changes
+ include modifications of your own, patches you receive via
+ e-mails, and merges resulting from pulling the "public"
+ repositories of your "subsystem maintainers".
You can repack this private repository whenever you feel
like.
- (6) Every once in a while, "git repack" the public repository.
+ (6) Push your changes to the public repository, and announce it
+ to the public.
+
+ (7) Every once in a while, "git repack" the public repository.
Go back to step (5) and continue working.
-A recommended work cycle for a "subsystem maintainer" that
-works on that project and has own "public repository" is like
-this:
+
+A recommended work cycle for a "subsystem maintainer" that works
+on that project and has own "public repository" goes like this:
(1) Prepare your work repository, by "git clone" the public
repository of the "project lead".
@@ -1006,21 +1023,27 @@ this:
currently not automated.
(4) Push into the public repository from your primary
- repository.
+ repository. Run "git repack" (and possibly "git
+ prune-packed" if the transport used for pulling from your
+ repository supports packed repositories.
- (5) Keep working in your primary repository, and push your
- changes to your public repository, and ask your "project
- lead" to pull from it. Your changes include your own,
- patches you receive via e-mail, and merge resulting from
- pulling the "public" repositories of your "project lead"
- and possibly your "sub-subsystem maintainers".
+ (5) Keep working in your primary repository. Your changes
+ include modifications of your own, patches you receive via
+ e-mails, and merges resulting from pulling the "public"
+ repositories of your "project lead" and possibly your
+ "sub-subsystem maintainers".
You can repack this private repository whenever you feel
like.
- (6) Every once in a while, "git repack" the public repository.
+ (6) Push your changes to your public repository, and ask your
+ "project lead" and possibly your "sub-subsystem
+ maintainers" to pull from it.
+
+ (7) Every once in a while, "git repack" the public repository.
Go back to step (5) and continue working.
+
A recommended work cycle for an "individual developer" who does
not have a "public" repository is somewhat different. It goes
like this: