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authorJunio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>2009-03-22 06:24:46 (GMT)
committerJunio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>2009-03-22 06:24:46 (GMT)
commit88f78ce8433ddf2f498cdcac33fed2c71f820cbd (patch)
tree3fe36f5e672afbf2cf67ac49a6b09c959252ce2f /Documentation
parentd291a9a6c8165efee95b3c1ceb814c39460ddbea (diff)
parent4306bcb4e14ab708f0083bcf0339fa77a4005c05 (diff)
downloadgit-88f78ce8433ddf2f498cdcac33fed2c71f820cbd.zip
git-88f78ce8433ddf2f498cdcac33fed2c71f820cbd.tar.gz
git-88f78ce8433ddf2f498cdcac33fed2c71f820cbd.tar.bz2
Merge branch 'dm/maint-docco'
* dm/maint-docco: Documentation: reword example text in git-bisect.txt. Documentation: reworded the "Description" section of git-bisect.txt. Documentation: minor grammatical fixes in git-branch.txt. Documentation: minor grammatical fixes in git-blame.txt. Documentation: reword the "Description" section of git-bisect.txt. Documentation: minor grammatical fixes in git-archive.txt.
Diffstat (limited to 'Documentation')
-rw-r--r--Documentation/blame-options.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-archive.txt8
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-bisect.txt171
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-blame.txt56
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-branch.txt50
-rw-r--r--Documentation/mailmap.txt17
6 files changed, 154 insertions, 150 deletions
diff --git a/Documentation/blame-options.txt b/Documentation/blame-options.txt
index 63fc197..1625ffc 100644
--- a/Documentation/blame-options.txt
+++ b/Documentation/blame-options.txt
@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ of lines before or after the line given by <start>.
Show raw timestamp (Default: off).
-S <revs-file>::
- Use revs from revs-file instead of calling linkgit:git-rev-list[1].
+ Use revisions from revs-file instead of calling linkgit:git-rev-list[1].
--reverse::
Walk history forward instead of backward. Instead of showing
diff --git a/Documentation/git-archive.txt b/Documentation/git-archive.txt
index 0eeefe0..c1adf59 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-archive.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-archive.txt
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ prepended to the filenames in the archive.
'git-archive' behaves differently when given a tree ID versus when
given a commit ID or tag ID. In the first case the current time is
-used as modification time of each file in the archive. In the latter
+used as the modification time of each file in the archive. In the latter
case the commit time as recorded in the referenced commit object is
used instead. Additionally the commit ID is stored in a global
extended pax header if the tar format is used; it can be extracted
@@ -52,11 +52,11 @@ OPTIONS
Write the archive to <file> instead of stdout.
<extra>::
- This can be any options that the archiver backend understand.
+ This can be any options that the archiver backend understands.
See next section.
--remote=<repo>::
- Instead of making a tar archive from local repository,
+ Instead of making a tar archive from the local repository,
retrieve a tar archive from a remote repository.
--exec=<git-upload-archive>::
@@ -109,7 +109,7 @@ EXAMPLES
git archive --format=tar --prefix=junk/ HEAD | (cd /var/tmp/ && tar xf -)::
Create a tar archive that contains the contents of the
- latest commit on the current branch, and extracts it in
+ latest commit on the current branch, and extract it in the
`/var/tmp/junk` directory.
git archive --format=tar --prefix=git-1.4.0/ v1.4.0 | gzip >git-1.4.0.tar.gz::
diff --git a/Documentation/git-bisect.txt b/Documentation/git-bisect.txt
index e65c1ca..93d9fc0 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-bisect.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-bisect.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-bisect(1)
NAME
----
-git-bisect - Find the change that introduced a bug by binary search
+git-bisect - Find by binary search the change that introduced a bug
SYNOPSIS
@@ -39,7 +39,8 @@ help" or "git bisect -h" to get a long usage description.
Basic bisect commands: start, bad, good
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-The way you use it is:
+Using the Linux kernel tree as an example, basic use of the bisect
+command is as follows:
------------------------------------------------
$ git bisect start
@@ -48,61 +49,63 @@ $ git bisect good v2.6.13-rc2 # v2.6.13-rc2 was the last version
# tested that was good
------------------------------------------------
-When you give at least one bad and one good versions, it will bisect
-the revision tree and say something like:
+When you have specified at least one bad and one good version, the
+command bisects the revision tree and outputs something similar to
+the following:
------------------------------------------------
Bisecting: 675 revisions left to test after this
------------------------------------------------
-and check out the state in the middle. Now, compile that kernel, and
-boot it. Now, let's say that this booted kernel works fine, then just
-do
+The state in the middle of the set of revisions is then checked out.
+You would now compile that kernel and boot it. If the booted kernel
+works correctly, you would then issue the following command:
------------------------------------------------
$ git bisect good # this one is good
------------------------------------------------
-which will now say
+The output of this command would be something similar to the following:
------------------------------------------------
Bisecting: 337 revisions left to test after this
------------------------------------------------
-and you continue along, compiling that one, testing it, and depending
-on whether it is good or bad, you say "git bisect good" or "git bisect
-bad", and ask for the next bisection.
+You keep repeating this process, compiling the tree, testing it, and
+depending on whether it is good or bad issuing the command "git bisect good"
+or "git bisect bad" to ask for the next bisection.
-Until you have no more left, and you'll have been left with the first
-bad kernel rev in "refs/bisect/bad".
+Eventually there will be no more revisions left to bisect, and you
+will have been left with the first bad kernel revision in "refs/bisect/bad".
Bisect reset
~~~~~~~~~~~~
-Oh, and then after you want to reset to the original head, do a
+To return to the original head after a bisect session, you issue the
+following command:
------------------------------------------------
$ git bisect reset
------------------------------------------------
-to get back to the original branch, instead of being on the bisection
-commit ("git bisect start" will do that for you too, actually: it will
-reset the bisection state).
+This resets the tree to the original branch instead of being on the
+bisection commit ("git bisect start" will also do that, as it resets
+the bisection state).
Bisect visualize
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-During the bisection process, you can say
+To see the currently remaining suspects in 'gitk', the following command
+is issued during the bisection process:
------------
$ git bisect visualize
------------
-to see the currently remaining suspects in 'gitk'. `visualize` is a bit
-too long to type and `view` is provided as a synonym.
+`view` may also be used as a synonym for `visualize`.
-If 'DISPLAY' environment variable is not set, 'git log' is used
-instead. You can even give command line options such as `-p` and
+If the 'DISPLAY' environment variable is not set, 'git log' is used
+instead. You can also give command line options such as `-p` and
`--stat`.
------------
@@ -112,57 +115,58 @@ $ git bisect view --stat
Bisect log and bisect replay
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-The good/bad input is logged, and
+After having marked revisions as good or bad, you issue the following
+command to show what has been done so far:
------------
$ git bisect log
------------
-shows what you have done so far. You can truncate its output somewhere
-and save it in a file, and run
+If you discover that you made a mistake in specifying the status of a
+revision, you can save the output of this command to a file, edit it to
+remove the incorrect entries, and then issue the following commands to
+return to a corrected state:
------------
+$ git bisect reset
$ git bisect replay that-file
------------
-if you find later you made a mistake telling good/bad about a
-revision.
-
-Avoiding to test a commit
+Avoiding testing a commit
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-If in a middle of bisect session, you know what the bisect suggested
-to try next is not a good one to test (e.g. the change the commit
+If in the middle of a bisect session, you know that the next suggested
+revision is not a good one to test (e.g. the change the commit
introduces is known not to work in your environment and you know it
does not have anything to do with the bug you are chasing), you may
-want to find a near-by commit and try that instead.
+want to find a nearby commit and try that instead.
-It goes something like this:
+For example:
------------
-$ git bisect good/bad # previous round was good/bad.
+$ git bisect good/bad # previous round was good or bad.
Bisecting: 337 revisions left to test after this
$ git bisect visualize # oops, that is uninteresting.
-$ git reset --hard HEAD~3 # try 3 revs before what
+$ git reset --hard HEAD~3 # try 3 revisions before what
# was suggested
------------
-Then compile and test the one you chose to try. After that, tell
-bisect what the result was as usual.
+Then compile and test the chosen revision. Afterwards the revision
+is marked as good or bad in the usual manner.
Bisect skip
~~~~~~~~~~~~
-Instead of choosing by yourself a nearby commit, you may just want git
-to do it for you using:
+Instead of choosing by yourself a nearby commit, you can ask git
+to do it for you by issuing the command:
------------
$ git bisect skip # Current version cannot be tested
------------
But computing the commit to test may be slower afterwards and git may
-eventually not be able to tell the first bad among a bad and one or
-more "skip"ped commits.
+eventually not be able to tell the first bad commit among a bad commit
+and one or more skipped commits.
You can even skip a range of commits, instead of just one commit,
using the "'<commit1>'..'<commit2>'" notation. For example:
@@ -171,33 +175,34 @@ using the "'<commit1>'..'<commit2>'" notation. For example:
$ git bisect skip v2.5..v2.6
------------
-would mean that no commit between `v2.5` excluded and `v2.6` included
-can be tested.
+The effect of this would be that no commit between `v2.5` excluded and
+`v2.6` included could be tested.
-Note that if you want to also skip the first commit of a range you can
-use something like:
+Note that if you also want to skip the first commit of the range you
+would issue the command:
------------
$ git bisect skip v2.5 v2.5..v2.6
------------
-and the commit pointed to by `v2.5` will be skipped too.
+This would cause the commits between `v2.5` included and `v2.6` included
+to be skipped.
+
Cutting down bisection by giving more parameters to bisect start
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-You can further cut down the number of trials if you know what part of
-the tree is involved in the problem you are tracking down, by giving
-paths parameters when you say `bisect start`, like this:
+You can further cut down the number of trials, if you know what part of
+the tree is involved in the problem you are tracking down, by specifying
+path parameters when issuing the `bisect start` command:
------------
$ git bisect start -- arch/i386 include/asm-i386
------------
-If you know beforehand more than one good commits, you can narrow the
-bisect space down without doing the whole tree checkout every time you
-give good commits. You give the bad revision immediately after `start`
-and then you give all the good revisions you have:
+If you know beforehand more than one good commit, you can narrow the
+bisect space down by specifying all of the good commits immediately after
+the bad commit when issuing the `bisect start` command:
------------
$ git bisect start v2.6.20-rc6 v2.6.20-rc4 v2.6.20-rc1 --
@@ -209,38 +214,38 @@ Bisect run
~~~~~~~~~~
If you have a script that can tell if the current source code is good
-or bad, you can automatically bisect using:
+or bad, you can bisect by issuing the command:
------------
$ git bisect run my_script arguments
------------
-Note that the "run" script (`my_script` in the above example) should
-exit with code 0 in case the current source code is good. Exit with a
+Note that the script (`my_script` in the above example) should
+exit with code 0 if the current source code is good, and exit with a
code between 1 and 127 (inclusive), except 125, if the current
source code is bad.
-Any other exit code will abort the automatic bisect process. (A
-program that does "exit(-1)" leaves $? = 255, see exit(3) manual page,
-the value is chopped with "& 0377".)
+Any other exit code will abort the bisect process. It should be noted
+that a program that terminates via "exit(-1)" leaves $? = 255, (see the
+exit(3) manual page), as the value is chopped with "& 0377".
The special exit code 125 should be used when the current source code
-cannot be tested. If the "run" script exits with this code, the current
-revision will be skipped, see `git bisect skip` above.
+cannot be tested. If the script exits with this code, the current
+revision will be skipped (see `git bisect skip` above).
-You may often find that during bisect you want to have near-constant
-tweaks (e.g., s/#define DEBUG 0/#define DEBUG 1/ in a header file, or
-"revision that does not have this commit needs this patch applied to
-work around other problem this bisection is not interested in")
-applied to the revision being tested.
+You may often find that during a bisect session you want to have
+temporary modifications (e.g. s/#define DEBUG 0/#define DEBUG 1/ in a
+header file, or "revision that does not have this commit needs this
+patch applied to work around another problem this bisection is not
+interested in") applied to the revision being tested.
To cope with such a situation, after the inner 'git bisect' finds the
-next revision to test, with the "run" script, you can apply that tweak
-before compiling, run the real test, and after the test decides if the
-revision (possibly with the needed tweaks) passed the test, rewind the
-tree to the pristine state. Finally the "run" script can exit with
-the status of the real test to let the "git bisect run" command loop to
-determine the outcome.
+next revision to test, the script can apply the patch
+before compiling, run the real test, and afterwards decide if the
+revision (possibly with the needed patch) passed the test and then
+rewind the tree to the pristine state. Finally the script should exit
+with the status of the real test to let the "git bisect run" command loop
+determine the eventual outcome of the bisect session.
EXAMPLES
--------
@@ -264,39 +269,39 @@ $ git bisect run make test # "make test" builds and tests
------------
$ cat ~/test.sh
#!/bin/sh
-make || exit 125 # this "skip"s broken builds
+make || exit 125 # this skips broken builds
make test # "make test" runs the test suite
$ git bisect start v1.3 v1.1 -- # v1.3 is bad, v1.1 is good
$ git bisect run ~/test.sh
------------
+
Here we use a "test.sh" custom script. In this script, if "make"
-fails, we "skip" the current commit.
+fails, we skip the current commit.
+
-It's safer to use a custom script outside the repo to prevent
+It is safer to use a custom script outside the repository to prevent
interactions between the bisect, make and test processes and the
script.
+
-And "make test" should "exit 0", if the test suite passes, and
-"exit 1" (for example) otherwise.
+"make test" should "exit 0", if the test suite passes, and
+"exit 1" otherwise.
* Automatically bisect a broken test case:
+
------------
$ cat ~/test.sh
#!/bin/sh
-make || exit 125 # this "skip"s broken builds
+make || exit 125 # this skips broken builds
~/check_test_case.sh # does the test case passes ?
$ git bisect start HEAD HEAD~10 -- # culprit is among the last 10
$ git bisect run ~/test.sh
------------
+
-Here "check_test_case.sh" should "exit 0", if the test case passes,
-and "exit 1" (for example) otherwise.
+Here "check_test_case.sh" should "exit 0" if the test case passes,
+and "exit 1" otherwise.
+
-It's safer if both "test.sh" and "check_test_case.sh" scripts are
-outside the repo to prevent interactions between the bisect, make and
-test processes and the scripts.
+It is safer if both "test.sh" and "check_test_case.sh" scripts are
+outside the repository to prevent interactions between the bisect,
+make and test processes and the scripts.
* Automatically bisect a broken test suite:
+
diff --git a/Documentation/git-blame.txt b/Documentation/git-blame.txt
index 4ef54d6..8c7b7b0 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-blame.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-blame.txt
@@ -18,9 +18,9 @@ DESCRIPTION
Annotates each line in the given file with information from the revision which
last modified the line. Optionally, start annotating from the given revision.
-Also it can limit the range of lines annotated.
+The command can also limit the range of lines annotated.
-This report doesn't tell you anything about lines which have been deleted or
+The report does not tell you anything about lines which have been deleted or
replaced; you need to use a tool such as 'git-diff' or the "pickaxe"
interface briefly mentioned in the following paragraph.
@@ -48,26 +48,26 @@ include::blame-options.txt[]
lines between files (see `-C`) and lines moved within a
file (see `-M`). The first number listed is the score.
This is the number of alphanumeric characters detected
- to be moved between or within files. This must be above
+ as having been moved between or within files. This must be above
a certain threshold for 'git-blame' to consider those lines
of code to have been moved.
-f::
--show-name::
- Show filename in the original commit. By default
- filename is shown if there is any line that came from a
- file with different name, due to rename detection.
+ Show the filename in the original commit. By default
+ the filename is shown if there is any line that came from a
+ file with a different name, due to rename detection.
-n::
--show-number::
- Show line number in the original commit (Default: off).
+ Show the line number in the original commit (Default: off).
-s::
- Suppress author name and timestamp from the output.
+ Suppress the author name and timestamp from the output.
-w::
- Ignore whitespace when comparing parent's version and
- child's to find where the lines came from.
+ Ignore whitespace when comparing the parent's version and
+ the child's to find where the lines came from.
THE PORCELAIN FORMAT
@@ -79,17 +79,17 @@ header at the minimum has the first line which has:
- 40-byte SHA-1 of the commit the line is attributed to;
- the line number of the line in the original file;
- the line number of the line in the final file;
-- on a line that starts a group of line from a different
+- on a line that starts a group of lines from a different
commit than the previous one, the number of lines in this
group. On subsequent lines this field is absent.
This header line is followed by the following information
at least once for each commit:
-- author name ("author"), email ("author-mail"), time
+- the author name ("author"), email ("author-mail"), time
("author-time"), and timezone ("author-tz"); similarly
for committer.
-- filename in the commit the line is attributed to.
+- the filename in the commit that the line is attributed to.
- the first line of the commit log message ("summary").
The contents of the actual line is output after the above
@@ -100,23 +100,23 @@ header elements later.
SPECIFYING RANGES
-----------------
-Unlike 'git-blame' and 'git-annotate' in older git, the extent
-of annotation can be limited to both line ranges and revision
+Unlike 'git-blame' and 'git-annotate' in older versions of git, the extent
+of the annotation can be limited to both line ranges and revision
ranges. When you are interested in finding the origin for
-ll. 40-60 for file `foo`, you can use `-L` option like these
+lines 40-60 for file `foo`, you can use the `-L` option like so
(they mean the same thing -- both ask for 21 lines starting at
line 40):
git blame -L 40,60 foo
git blame -L 40,+21 foo
-Also you can use regular expression to specify the line range.
+Also you can use a regular expression to specify the line range:
git blame -L '/^sub hello {/,/^}$/' foo
-would limit the annotation to the body of `hello` subroutine.
+which limits the annotation to the body of the `hello` subroutine.
-When you are not interested in changes older than the version
+When you are not interested in changes older than version
v2.6.18, or changes older than 3 weeks, you can use revision
range specifiers similar to 'git-rev-list':
@@ -129,7 +129,7 @@ commit v2.6.18 or the most recent commit that is more than 3
weeks old in the above example) are blamed for that range
boundary commit.
-A particularly useful way is to see if an added file have lines
+A particularly useful way is to see if an added file has lines
created by copy-and-paste from existing files. Sometimes this
indicates that the developer was being sloppy and did not
refactor the code properly. You can first find the commit that
@@ -162,26 +162,26 @@ annotated.
+
Line numbers count from 1.
-. The first time that commit shows up in the stream, it has various
+. The first time that a commit shows up in the stream, it has various
other information about it printed out with a one-word tag at the
- beginning of each line about that "extended commit info" (author,
- email, committer, dates, summary etc).
+ beginning of each line describing the extra commit information (author,
+ email, committer, dates, summary, etc.).
-. Unlike Porcelain format, the filename information is always
+. Unlike the Porcelain format, the filename information is always
given and terminates the entry:
"filename" <whitespace-quoted-filename-goes-here>
+
-and thus it's really quite easy to parse for some line- and word-oriented
+and thus it is really quite easy to parse for some line- and word-oriented
parser (which should be quite natural for most scripting languages).
+
[NOTE]
For people who do parsing: to make it more robust, just ignore any
-lines in between the first and last one ("<sha1>" and "filename" lines)
-where you don't recognize the tag-words (or care about that particular
+lines between the first and last one ("<sha1>" and "filename" lines)
+where you do not recognize the tag words (or care about that particular
one) at the beginning of the "extended information" lines. That way, if
there is ever added information (like the commit encoding or extended
-commit commentary), a blame viewer won't ever care.
+commit commentary), a blame viewer will not care.
MAPPING AUTHORS
diff --git a/Documentation/git-branch.txt b/Documentation/git-branch.txt
index 27b73bc..31ba7f2 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-branch.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-branch.txt
@@ -18,19 +18,19 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-With no arguments, existing branches are listed, the current branch will
+With no arguments, existing branches are listed and the current branch will
be highlighted with an asterisk. Option `-r` causes the remote-tracking
branches to be listed, and option `-a` shows both.
-With `--contains`, shows only the branches that contains the named commit
-(in other words, the branches whose tip commits are descendant of the
+With `--contains`, shows only the branches that contain the named commit
+(in other words, the branches whose tip commits are descendants of the
named commit). With `--merged`, only branches merged into the named
commit (i.e. the branches whose tip commits are reachable from the named
commit) will be listed. With `--no-merged` only branches not merged into
-the named commit will be listed. Missing <commit> argument defaults to
-'HEAD' (i.e. the tip of the current branch).
+the named commit will be listed. If the <commit> argument is missing it
+defaults to 'HEAD' (i.e. the tip of the current branch).
-In its second form, a new branch named <branchname> will be created.
+In the command's second form, a new branch named <branchname> will be created.
It will start out with a head equal to the one given as <start-point>.
If no <start-point> is given, the branch will be created with a head
equal to that of the currently checked out branch.
@@ -57,9 +57,9 @@ has a reflog then the reflog will also be deleted.
Use -r together with -d to delete remote-tracking branches. Note, that it
only makes sense to delete remote-tracking branches if they no longer exist
-in remote repository or if 'git-fetch' was configured not to fetch
-them again. See also 'prune' subcommand of linkgit:git-remote[1] for way to
-clean up all obsolete remote-tracking branches.
+in the remote repository or if 'git-fetch' was configured not to fetch
+them again. See also the 'prune' subcommand of linkgit:git-remote[1] for a
+way to clean up all obsolete remote-tracking branches.
OPTIONS
@@ -83,7 +83,7 @@ OPTIONS
Move/rename a branch and the corresponding reflog.
-M::
- Move/rename a branch even if the new branchname already exists.
+ Move/rename a branch even if the new branch name already exists.
--color::
Color branches to highlight current, local, and remote branches.
@@ -103,17 +103,17 @@ OPTIONS
Show sha1 and commit subject line for each head.
--abbrev=<length>::
- Alter minimum display length for sha1 in output listing,
- default value is 7.
+ Alter the sha1's minimum display length in the output listing.
+ The default value is 7.
--no-abbrev::
- Display the full sha1s in output listing rather than abbreviating them.
+ Display the full sha1s in the output listing rather than abbreviating them.
--track::
- When creating a new branch, set up configuration so that 'git-pull'
+ When creating a new branch, set up the configuration so that 'git-pull'
will automatically retrieve data from the start point, which must be
a branch. Use this if you always pull from the same upstream branch
- into the new branch, and if you don't want to use "git pull
+ into the new branch, and if you do not want to use "git pull
<repository> <refspec>" explicitly. This behavior is the default
when the start point is a remote branch. Set the
branch.autosetupmerge configuration variable to `false` if you want
@@ -149,13 +149,13 @@ OPTIONS
<newbranch>::
The new name for an existing branch. The same restrictions as for
- <branchname> applies.
+ <branchname> apply.
Examples
--------
-Start development off of a known tag::
+Start development from a known tag::
+
------------
$ git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/.../linux-2.6 my2.6
@@ -167,7 +167,7 @@ $ git checkout my2.6.14
<1> This step and the next one could be combined into a single step with
"checkout -b my2.6.14 v2.6.14".
-Delete unneeded branch::
+Delete an unneeded branch::
+
------------
$ git clone git://git.kernel.org/.../git.git my.git
@@ -176,21 +176,21 @@ $ git branch -d -r origin/todo origin/html origin/man <1>
$ git branch -D test <2>
------------
+
-<1> Delete remote-tracking branches "todo", "html", "man". Next 'fetch' or
-'pull' will create them again unless you configure them not to. See
-linkgit:git-fetch[1].
-<2> Delete "test" branch even if the "master" branch (or whichever branch is
-currently checked out) does not have all commits from test branch.
+<1> Delete the remote-tracking branches "todo", "html" and "man". The next
+'fetch' or 'pull' will create them again unless you configure them not to.
+See linkgit:git-fetch[1].
+<2> Delete the "test" branch even if the "master" branch (or whichever branch
+is currently checked out) does not have all commits from the test branch.
Notes
-----
-If you are creating a branch that you want to immediately checkout, it's
+If you are creating a branch that you want to checkout immediately, it is
easier to use the git checkout command with its `-b` option to create
a branch and check it out with a single command.
-The options `--contains`, `--merged` and `--no-merged` serves three related
+The options `--contains`, `--merged` and `--no-merged` serve three related
but different purposes:
- `--contains <commit>` is used to find all branches which will need
diff --git a/Documentation/mailmap.txt b/Documentation/mailmap.txt
index e25b154..288f04e 100644
--- a/Documentation/mailmap.txt
+++ b/Documentation/mailmap.txt
@@ -5,22 +5,21 @@ canonical real names and email addresses.
In the simple form, each line in the file consists of the canonical
real name of an author, whitespace, and an email address used in the
-commit (enclosed by '<' and '>') to map to the name. Thus, looks like
-this
+commit (enclosed by '<' and '>') to map to the name. For example:
--
Proper Name <commit@email.xx>
--
-The more complex forms are
+The more complex forms are:
--
<proper@email.xx> <commit@email.xx>
--
-which allows mailmap to replace only the email part of a commit, and
+which allows mailmap to replace only the email part of a commit, and:
--
Proper Name <proper@email.xx> <commit@email.xx>
--
which allows mailmap to replace both the name and the email of a
-commit matching the specified commit email address, and
+commit matching the specified commit email address, and:
--
Proper Name <proper@email.xx> Commit Name <commit@email.xx>
--
@@ -47,8 +46,8 @@ Jane Doe <jane@desktop.(none)>
Joe R. Developer <joe@example.com>
------------
-Note how we don't need an entry for <jane@laptop.(none)>, because the
-real name of that author is correct already.
+Note how there is no need for an entry for <jane@laptop.(none)>, because the
+real name of that author is already correct.
Example 2: Your repository contains commits from the following
authors:
@@ -62,7 +61,7 @@ claus <me@company.xx>
CTO <cto@coompany.xx>
------------
-Then, you might want a `.mailmap` file looking like:
+Then you might want a `.mailmap` file that looks like:
------------
<cto@company.xx> <cto@coompany.xx>
Some Dude <some@dude.xx> nick1 <bugs@company.xx>
@@ -72,4 +71,4 @@ Santa Claus <santa.claus@northpole.xx> <me@company.xx>
------------
Use hash '#' for comments that are either on their own line, or after
-the email address. \ No newline at end of file
+the email address.