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authorJonathan Nieder <jrnieder@uchicago.edu>2008-06-30 18:56:34 (GMT)
committerJunio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>2008-07-02 00:20:16 (GMT)
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Documentation formatting and cleanup
Following what appears to be the predominant style, format names of commands and commandlines both as `teletype text`. While we're at it, add articles ("a" and "the") in some places, italicize the name of the command in the manual page synopsis line, and add a comma or two where it seems appropriate. Signed-off-by: Jonathan Nieder <jrnieder@uchicago.edu> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
Diffstat (limited to 'Documentation/gittutorial-2.txt')
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gittutorial-2.txt28
1 files changed, 14 insertions, 14 deletions
diff --git a/Documentation/gittutorial-2.txt b/Documentation/gittutorial-2.txt
index f2624aa..6c93445 100644
--- a/Documentation/gittutorial-2.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gittutorial-2.txt
@@ -54,7 +54,7 @@ following the example above generates a different SHA1 hash than
the one shown above because the commit object records the time when
it was created and the name of the person performing the commit.
-We can ask git about this particular object with the cat-file
+We can ask git about this particular object with the `cat-file`
command. Don't copy the 40 hex digits from this example but use those
from your own version. Note that you can shorten it to only a few
characters to save yourself typing all 40 hex digits:
@@ -212,8 +212,8 @@ designate such an argument.
The index file
--------------
-The primary tool we've been using to create commits is "git-commit
--a", which creates a commit including every change you've made to
+The primary tool we've been using to create commits is `git-commit
+-a`, which creates a commit including every change you've made to
your working tree. But what if you want to commit changes only to
certain files? Or only certain changes to certain files?
@@ -255,7 +255,7 @@ index a042389..513feba 100644
+hello world, again
------------------------------------------------
-So "git-diff" is comparing against something other than the head.
+So `git-diff` is comparing against something other than the head.
The thing that it's comparing against is actually the index file,
which is stored in .git/index in a binary format, but whose contents
we can examine with ls-files:
@@ -270,9 +270,9 @@ hello world!
hello world, again
------------------------------------------------
-So what our "git-add" did was store a new blob and then put
+So what our `git-add` did was store a new blob and then put
a reference to it in the index file. If we modify the file again,
-we'll see that the new modifications are reflected in the "git-diff"
+we'll see that the new modifications are reflected in the `git-diff`
output:
------------------------------------------------
@@ -287,7 +287,7 @@ index 513feba..ba3da7b 100644
+again?
------------------------------------------------
-With the right arguments, git-diff can also show us the difference
+With the right arguments, `git-diff` can also show us the difference
between the working directory and the last commit, or between the
index and the last commit:
@@ -311,8 +311,8 @@ index a042389..513feba 100644
+hello world, again
------------------------------------------------
-At any time, we can create a new commit using "git-commit" (without
-the -a option), and verify that the state committed only includes the
+At any time, we can create a new commit using `git-commit` (without
+the "-a" option), and verify that the state committed only includes the
changes stored in the index file, not the additional change that is
still only in our working tree:
@@ -329,11 +329,11 @@ index 513feba..ba3da7b 100644
+again?
------------------------------------------------
-So by default "git-commit" uses the index to create the commit, not
-the working tree; the -a option to commit tells it to first update
+So by default `git-commit` uses the index to create the commit, not
+the working tree; the "-a" option to commit tells it to first update
the index with all changes in the working tree.
-Finally, it's worth looking at the effect of "git-add" on the index
+Finally, it's worth looking at the effect of `git-add` on the index
file:
------------------------------------------------
@@ -341,7 +341,7 @@ $ echo "goodbye, world" >closing.txt
$ git add closing.txt
------------------------------------------------
-The effect of the "git-add" was to add one entry to the index file:
+The effect of the `git-add` was to add one entry to the index file:
------------------------------------------------
$ git ls-files --stage
@@ -382,7 +382,7 @@ it is marked "changed but not updated". At this point, running "git
commit" would create a commit that added closing.txt (with its new
contents), but that didn't modify file.txt.
-Also, note that a bare "git diff" shows the changes to file.txt, but
+Also, note that a bare `git diff` shows the changes to file.txt, but
not the addition of closing.txt, because the version of closing.txt
in the index file is identical to the one in the working directory.