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authorChristian Couder <chriscool@tuxfamily.org>2007-03-24 05:31:49 (GMT)
committerJunio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>2007-03-24 06:26:11 (GMT)
commitfed820ad5662d8b6f11b5e7f788fa87afe1ad919 (patch)
treeaebc908189e84dd62990f908a0fbd8c55ff0332e /Documentation/git-bisect.txt
parentcc070d1f797c7488ed479817d893ad78fc4dae2b (diff)
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Documentation: bisect: reformat more paragraphs.
Signed-off-by: Christian Couder <chriscool@tuxfamily.org> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
Diffstat (limited to 'Documentation/git-bisect.txt')
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-bisect.txt73
1 files changed, 39 insertions, 34 deletions
diff --git a/Documentation/git-bisect.txt b/Documentation/git-bisect.txt
index 4bd468e..0bfb152 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-bisect.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-bisect.txt
@@ -12,8 +12,8 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-The command takes various subcommands, and different options
-depending on the subcommand:
+The command takes various subcommands, and different options depending
+on the subcommand:
git bisect start [<paths>...]
git bisect bad <rev>
@@ -24,10 +24,9 @@ depending on the subcommand:
git bisect log
git bisect run <cmd>...
-This command uses 'git-rev-list --bisect' option to help drive
-the binary search process to find which change introduced a bug,
-given an old "good" commit object name and a later "bad" commit
-object name.
+This command uses 'git-rev-list --bisect' option to help drive the
+binary search process to find which change introduced a bug, given an
+old "good" commit object name and a later "bad" commit object name.
The way you use it is:
@@ -38,15 +37,16 @@ $ git bisect good v2.6.13-rc2 # v2.6.13-rc2 was the last version
# tested that was good
------------------------------------------------
-When you give at least one bad and one good versions, it will
-bisect the revision tree and say something like:
+When you give at least one bad and one good versions, it will bisect
+the revision tree and say something like:
------------------------------------------------
Bisecting: 675 revisions left to test after this
------------------------------------------------
-and check out the state in the middle. Now, compile that kernel, and boot
-it. Now, let's say that this booted kernel works fine, then just do
+and check out the state in the middle. Now, compile that kernel, and
+boot it. Now, let's say that this booted kernel works fine, then just
+do
------------------------------------------------
$ git bisect good # this one is good
@@ -58,12 +58,12 @@ which will now say
Bisecting: 337 revisions left to test after this
------------------------------------------------
-and you continue along, compiling that one, testing it, and depending on
-whether it is good or bad, you say "git bisect good" or "git bisect bad",
-and ask for the next bisection.
+and you continue along, compiling that one, testing it, and depending
+on whether it is good or bad, you say "git bisect good" or "git bisect
+bad", and ask for the next bisection.
-Until you have no more left, and you'll have been left with the first bad
-kernel rev in "refs/bisect/bad".
+Until you have no more left, and you'll have been left with the first
+bad kernel rev in "refs/bisect/bad".
Oh, and then after you want to reset to the original head, do a
@@ -71,10 +71,10 @@ Oh, and then after you want to reset to the original head, do a
$ git bisect reset
------------------------------------------------
-to get back to the master branch, instead of being in one of the bisection
-branches ("git bisect start" will do that for you too, actually: it will
-reset the bisection state, and before it does that it checks that you're
-not using some old bisection branch).
+to get back to the master branch, instead of being in one of the
+bisection branches ("git bisect start" will do that for you too,
+actually: it will reset the bisection state, and before it does that
+it checks that you're not using some old bisection branch).
During the bisection process, you can say
@@ -84,9 +84,14 @@ $ git bisect visualize
to see the currently remaining suspects in `gitk`.
-The good/bad input is logged, and `git bisect
-log` shows what you have done so far. You can truncate its
-output somewhere and save it in a file, and run
+The good/bad input is logged, and
+
+------------
+$ git bisect log
+------------
+
+shows what you have done so far. You can truncate its output somewhere
+and save it in a file, and run
------------
$ git bisect replay that-file
@@ -95,12 +100,13 @@ $ git bisect replay that-file
if you find later you made a mistake telling good/bad about a
revision.
-If in a middle of bisect session, you know what the bisect
-suggested to try next is not a good one to test (e.g. the change
-the commit introduces is known not to work in your environment
-and you know it does not have anything to do with the bug you
-are chasing), you may want to find a near-by commit and try that
-instead. It goes something like this:
+If in a middle of bisect session, you know what the bisect suggested
+to try next is not a good one to test (e.g. the change the commit
+introduces is known not to work in your environment and you know it
+does not have anything to do with the bug you are chasing), you may
+want to find a near-by commit and try that instead.
+
+It goes something like this:
------------
$ git bisect good/bad # previous round was good/bad.
@@ -110,13 +116,12 @@ $ git reset --hard HEAD~3 # try 3 revs before what
# was suggested
------------
-Then compile and test the one you chose to try. After that,
-tell bisect what the result was as usual.
+Then compile and test the one you chose to try. After that, tell
+bisect what the result was as usual.
-You can further cut down the number of trials if you know what
-part of the tree is involved in the problem you are tracking
-down, by giving paths parameters when you say `bisect start`,
-like this:
+You can further cut down the number of trials if you know what part of
+the tree is involved in the problem you are tracking down, by giving
+paths parameters when you say `bisect start`, like this:
------------
$ git bisect start arch/i386 include/asm-i386