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authorLinus Torvalds <torvalds@ppc970.osdl.org>2005-06-01 16:27:22 (GMT)
committerLinus Torvalds <torvalds@ppc970.osdl.org>2005-06-01 16:27:22 (GMT)
commit81bb573ed882523e345f0923b88db2aac8f4b93c (patch)
tree33942306faa3093107cc7105dff046de5c981d2e
parente764b8e8b3c50b131be825532ba26fa346d6586e (diff)
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Update tutorial for simplified "git" script.
Use "git commit" instead of "git-commit-script", and talk about using "git log" before introducing the more complex "git-whatchanged". In short, try to make it feel a bit more normal to those poor souls using CVS. Do some whitspace edits too, to make the side notes stand out a bit more.
-rw-r--r--Documentation/tutorial.txt27
1 files changed, 19 insertions, 8 deletions
diff --git a/Documentation/tutorial.txt b/Documentation/tutorial.txt
index 8cc383f..15f4f01 100644
--- a/Documentation/tutorial.txt
+++ b/Documentation/tutorial.txt
@@ -157,9 +157,9 @@ which will print out "Hello World". The object 557db... is nothing
more than the contents of your file "a".
[ Digression: don't confuse that object with the file "a" itself. The
-object is literally just those specific _contents_ of the file, and
-however much you later change the contents in file "a", the object we
-just looked at will never change. Objects are immutable. ]
+ object is literally just those specific _contents_ of the file, and
+ however much you later change the contents in file "a", the object we
+ just looked at will never change. Objects are immutable. ]
Anyway, as we mentioned previously, you normally never actually take a
look at the objects themselves, and typing long 40-character hex SHA1
@@ -346,7 +346,7 @@ script for doing all of the non-initial commits that does all of this
for you, and starts up an editor to let you write your commit message
yourself, so let's just use that:
- git-commit-script
+ git commit
Write whatever message you want, and all the lines that start with '#'
will be pruned out, and the rest will be used as the commit message for
@@ -398,14 +398,25 @@ changes. A trivial (but very useful) script called "git-whatchanged" is
included with git which does exactly this, and shows a log of recent
activity.
-To see the whole history of our pitiful little git-tutorial project, we
+To see the whole history of our pitiful little git-tutorial project, you
can do
+ git log
+
+which shows just the log messages, or if we want to see the log together
+whith the associated patches use the more complex (and much more
+powerful)
+
git-whatchanged -p --root
-(the "--root" flag is a flag to git-diff-tree to tell it to show the
-initial aka "root" commit as a diff too), and you will see exactly what
-has changed in the repository over its short history.
+and you will see exactly what has changed in the repository over its
+short history.
+
+[ Side note: the "--root" flag is a flag to git-diff-tree to tell it to
+ show the initial aka "root" commit too. Normally you'd probably not
+ want to see the initial import diff, but since the tutorial project
+ was started from scratch and is so small, we use it to make the result
+ a bit more interesting ]
With that, you should now be having some inkling of what git does, and
can explore on your own.