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authorThomas Ackermann <th.acker@arcor.de>2013-01-21 19:17:53 (GMT)
committerJunio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>2013-02-01 21:53:33 (GMT)
commit2de9b71138171dca7279db3b3fe67e868c76d921 (patch)
tree09cc74f510322f4f1241cd11a374490bc32d5aa3
parent48a8c26c625a4d3631c4f614bceb38933e741408 (diff)
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Documentation: the name of the system is 'Git', not 'git'
Signed-off-by: Thomas Ackermann <th.acker@arcor.de> Signed-off-by: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
-rw-r--r--Documentation/CodingGuidelines14
-rw-r--r--Documentation/Makefile4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/SubmittingPatches10
-rw-r--r--Documentation/blame-options.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/config.txt112
-rw-r--r--Documentation/diff-config.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/diff-options.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/everyday.txt6
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-apply.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-archimport.txt16
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-archive.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-bisect-lk2009.txt22
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-bisect.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-blame.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-branch.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-bundle.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-check-ref-format.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-checkout.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-clean.txt8
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-clone.txt14
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-commit-tree.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-commit.txt6
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-credential-cache.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-credential-store.txt6
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-credential.txt6
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-cvsexportcommit.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-cvsimport.txt10
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-cvsserver.txt20
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-daemon.txt8
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-describe.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-diff.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-difftool.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-fetch.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-filter-branch.txt6
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-format-patch.txt10
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-fsck.txt6
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-grep.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-gui.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-hash-object.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-help.txt6
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-http-backend.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-http-fetch.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-index-pack.txt6
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-init-db.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-init.txt16
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-log.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-ls-files.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-merge-index.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-merge.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-mergetool--lib.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-mktag.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-p4.txt84
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-pack-objects.txt12
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-pull.txt8
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-push.txt8
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-quiltimport.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-rebase.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-reflog.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-remote-ext.txt14
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-remote-fd.txt8
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-remote-helpers.txt48
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-replace.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-rev-list.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-rev-parse.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-rm.txt10
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-send-pack.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-sh-setup.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-show-index.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-status.txt8
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-stripspace.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-submodule.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-svn.txt88
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-tag.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-tools.txt26
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-update-index.txt16
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-upload-archive.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-upload-pack.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-var.txt12
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-verify-pack.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-verify-tag.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-web--browse.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git-whatchanged.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/git.txt88
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitattributes.txt72
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitcli.txt14
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitcore-tutorial.txt150
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitcredentials.txt24
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitcvs-migration.txt22
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitdiffcore.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitglossary.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/githooks.txt8
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitignore.txt22
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitk.txt8
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitmodules.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitnamespaces.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitrepository-layout.txt10
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitrevisions.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gittutorial-2.txt38
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gittutorial.txt44
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitweb.conf.txt32
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitweb.txt20
-rw-r--r--Documentation/gitworkflows.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/glossary-content.txt56
-rwxr-xr-xDocumentation/howto-index.sh2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/howto/maintain-git.txt6
-rw-r--r--Documentation/howto/new-command.txt20
-rw-r--r--Documentation/howto/rebuild-from-update-hook.txt8
-rw-r--r--Documentation/howto/recover-corrupted-blob-object.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/howto/revert-a-faulty-merge.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/howto/setup-git-server-over-http.txt14
-rw-r--r--Documentation/howto/use-git-daemon.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/howto/using-signed-tag-in-pull-request.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/i18n.txt8
-rw-r--r--Documentation/merge-config.txt8
-rw-r--r--Documentation/rev-list-options.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/revisions.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/technical/api-builtin.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/technical/api-config.txt10
-rw-r--r--Documentation/technical/api-credentials.txt20
-rw-r--r--Documentation/technical/api-directory-listing.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/technical/api-parse-options.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/technical/api-remote.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/technical/index-format.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/technical/pack-heuristics.txt20
-rw-r--r--Documentation/technical/racy-git.txt26
-rw-r--r--Documentation/urls-remotes.txt2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/urls.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/user-manual.txt212
128 files changed, 902 insertions, 902 deletions
diff --git a/Documentation/CodingGuidelines b/Documentation/CodingGuidelines
index 423ea66..1d7de5f 100644
--- a/Documentation/CodingGuidelines
+++ b/Documentation/CodingGuidelines
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
Like other projects, we also have some guidelines to keep to the
-code. For git in general, three rough rules are:
+code. For Git in general, three rough rules are:
- Most importantly, we never say "It's in POSIX; we'll happily
ignore your needs should your system not conform to it."
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ code. For git in general, three rough rules are:
As for more concrete guidelines, just imitate the existing code
(this is a good guideline, no matter which project you are
contributing to). It is always preferable to match the _local_
-convention. New code added to git suite is expected to match
+convention. New code added to Git suite is expected to match
the overall style of existing code. Modifications to existing
code is expected to match the style the surrounding code already
uses (even if it doesn't match the overall style of existing code).
@@ -112,7 +112,7 @@ For C programs:
- We try to keep to at most 80 characters per line.
- - We try to support a wide range of C compilers to compile git with,
+ - We try to support a wide range of C compilers to compile Git with,
including old ones. That means that you should not use C99
initializers, even if a lot of compilers grok it.
@@ -164,14 +164,14 @@ For C programs:
- If you are planning a new command, consider writing it in shell
or perl first, so that changes in semantics can be easily
- changed and discussed. Many git commands started out like
+ changed and discussed. Many Git commands started out like
that, and a few are still scripts.
- - Avoid introducing a new dependency into git. This means you
+ - Avoid introducing a new dependency into Git. This means you
usually should stay away from scripting languages not already
- used in the git core command set (unless your command is clearly
+ used in the Git core command set (unless your command is clearly
separate from it, such as an importer to convert random-scm-X
- repositories to git).
+ repositories to Git).
- When we pass <string, length> pair to functions, we should try to
pass them in that order.
diff --git a/Documentation/Makefile b/Documentation/Makefile
index 971977b..c2d3ec1 100644
--- a/Documentation/Makefile
+++ b/Documentation/Makefile
@@ -346,8 +346,8 @@ $(patsubst %.txt,%.html,$(wildcard howto/*.txt)): %.html : %.txt
install-webdoc : html
'$(SHELL_PATH_SQ)' ./install-webdoc.sh $(WEBDOC_DEST)
-# You must have a clone of git-htmldocs and git-manpages repositories
-# next to the git repository itself for the following to work.
+# You must have a clone of 'git-htmldocs' and 'git-manpages' repositories
+# next to the 'git' repository itself for the following to work.
quick-install: quick-install-man
diff --git a/Documentation/SubmittingPatches b/Documentation/SubmittingPatches
index e831188..d0a4733 100644
--- a/Documentation/SubmittingPatches
+++ b/Documentation/SubmittingPatches
@@ -103,9 +103,9 @@ without external resources. Instead of giving a URL to a mailing list
archive, summarize the relevant points of the discussion.
-(3) Generate your patch using git tools out of your commits.
+(3) Generate your patch using Git tools out of your commits.
-git based diff tools generate unidiff which is the preferred format.
+Git based diff tools generate unidiff which is the preferred format.
You do not have to be afraid to use -M option to "git diff" or
"git format-patch", if your patch involves file renames. The
@@ -122,7 +122,7 @@ that is fine, but please mark it as such.
(4) Sending your patches.
-People on the git mailing list need to be able to read and
+People on the Git mailing list need to be able to read and
comment on the changes you are submitting. It is important for
a developer to be able to "quote" your changes, using standard
e-mail tools, so that they may comment on specific portions of
@@ -244,7 +244,7 @@ then you just add a line saying
Signed-off-by: Random J Developer <random@developer.example.org>
-This line can be automatically added by git if you run the git-commit
+This line can be automatically added by Git if you run the git-commit
command with the -s option.
Notice that you can place your own Signed-off-by: line when
@@ -337,7 +337,7 @@ Know the status of your patch after submission
tell you if your patch is merged in pu if you rebase on top of
master).
-* Read the git mailing list, the maintainer regularly posts messages
+* Read the Git mailing list, the maintainer regularly posts messages
entitled "What's cooking in git.git" and "What's in git.git" giving
the status of various proposed changes.
diff --git a/Documentation/blame-options.txt b/Documentation/blame-options.txt
index d4a51da..b0d31df 100644
--- a/Documentation/blame-options.txt
+++ b/Documentation/blame-options.txt
@@ -95,7 +95,7 @@ of lines before or after the line given by <start>.
running extra passes of inspection.
+
<num> is optional but it is the lower bound on the number of
-alphanumeric characters that git must detect as moving/copying
+alphanumeric characters that Git must detect as moving/copying
within a file for it to associate those lines with the parent
commit. The default value is 20.
@@ -110,7 +110,7 @@ commit. The default value is 20.
looks for copies from other files in any commit.
+
<num> is optional but it is the lower bound on the number of
-alphanumeric characters that git must detect as moving/copying
+alphanumeric characters that Git must detect as moving/copying
between files for it to associate those lines with the parent
commit. And the default value is 40. If there are more than one
`-C` options given, the <num> argument of the last `-C` will
diff --git a/Documentation/config.txt b/Documentation/config.txt
index b87f744..1bfbc7a 100644
--- a/Documentation/config.txt
+++ b/Documentation/config.txt
@@ -1,14 +1,14 @@
CONFIGURATION FILE
------------------
-The git configuration file contains a number of variables that affect
-the git command's behavior. The `.git/config` file in each repository
+The Git configuration file contains a number of variables that affect
+the Git commands' behavior. The `.git/config` file in each repository
is used to store the configuration for that repository, and
`$HOME/.gitconfig` is used to store a per-user configuration as
fallback values for the `.git/config` file. The file `/etc/gitconfig`
can be used to store a system-wide default configuration.
-The configuration variables are used by both the git plumbing
+The configuration variables are used by both the Git plumbing
and the porcelains. The variables are divided into sections, wherein
the fully qualified variable name of the variable itself is the last
dot-separated segment and the section name is everything before the last
@@ -209,9 +209,9 @@ core.ignoreCygwinFSTricks::
core.ignorecase::
If true, this option enables various workarounds to enable
- git to work better on filesystems that are not case sensitive,
+ Git to work better on filesystems that are not case sensitive,
like FAT. For example, if a directory listing finds
- "makefile" when git expects "Makefile", git will assume
+ "makefile" when Git expects "Makefile", Git will assume
it is really the same file, and continue to remember it as
"Makefile".
+
@@ -220,13 +220,13 @@ will probe and set core.ignorecase true if appropriate when the repository
is created.
core.precomposeunicode::
- This option is only used by Mac OS implementation of git.
- When core.precomposeunicode=true, git reverts the unicode decomposition
+ This option is only used by Mac OS implementation of Git.
+ When core.precomposeunicode=true, Git reverts the unicode decomposition
of filenames done by Mac OS. This is useful when sharing a repository
between Mac OS and Linux or Windows.
- (Git for Windows 1.7.10 or higher is needed, or git under cygwin 1.7).
- When false, file names are handled fully transparent by git,
- which is backward compatible with older versions of git.
+ (Git for Windows 1.7.10 or higher is needed, or Git under cygwin 1.7).
+ When false, file names are handled fully transparent by Git,
+ which is backward compatible with older versions of Git.
core.trustctime::
If false, the ctime differences between the index and the
@@ -256,20 +256,20 @@ core.eol::
conversion.
core.safecrlf::
- If true, makes git check if converting `CRLF` is reversible when
+ If true, makes Git check if converting `CRLF` is reversible when
end-of-line conversion is active. Git will verify if a command
modifies a file in the work tree either directly or indirectly.
For example, committing a file followed by checking out the
same file should yield the original file in the work tree. If
this is not the case for the current setting of
- `core.autocrlf`, git will reject the file. The variable can
- be set to "warn", in which case git will only warn about an
+ `core.autocrlf`, Git will reject the file. The variable can
+ be set to "warn", in which case Git will only warn about an
irreversible conversion but continue the operation.
+
CRLF conversion bears a slight chance of corrupting data.
-When it is enabled, git will convert CRLF to LF during commit and LF to
+When it is enabled, Git will convert CRLF to LF during commit and LF to
CRLF during checkout. A file that contains a mixture of LF and
-CRLF before the commit cannot be recreated by git. For text
+CRLF before the commit cannot be recreated by Git. For text
files this is the right thing to do: it corrects line endings
such that we have only LF line endings in the repository.
But for binary files that are accidentally classified as text the
@@ -279,7 +279,7 @@ If you recognize such corruption early you can easily fix it by
setting the conversion type explicitly in .gitattributes. Right
after committing you still have the original file in your work
tree and this file is not yet corrupted. You can explicitly tell
-git that this file is binary and git will handle the file
+Git that this file is binary and Git will handle the file
appropriately.
+
Unfortunately, the desired effect of cleaning up text files with
@@ -324,7 +324,7 @@ is created.
core.gitProxy::
A "proxy command" to execute (as 'command host port') instead
of establishing direct connection to the remote server when
- using the git protocol for fetching. If the variable value is
+ using the Git protocol for fetching. If the variable value is
in the "COMMAND for DOMAIN" format, the command is applied only
on hostnames ending with the specified domain string. This variable
may be set multiple times and is matched in the given order;
@@ -383,7 +383,7 @@ Note that this variable is honored even when set in a configuration
file in a ".git" subdirectory of a directory and its value differs
from the latter directory (e.g. "/path/to/.git/config" has
core.worktree set to "/different/path"), which is most likely a
-misconfiguration. Running git commands in the "/path/to" directory will
+misconfiguration. Running Git commands in the "/path/to" directory will
still use "/different/path" as the root of the work tree and can cause
confusion unless you know what you are doing (e.g. you are creating a
read-only snapshot of the same index to a location different from the
@@ -415,7 +415,7 @@ core.sharedRepository::
several users in a group (making sure all the files and objects are
group-writable). When 'all' (or 'world' or 'everybody'), the
repository will be readable by all users, additionally to being
- group-shareable. When 'umask' (or 'false'), git will use permissions
+ group-shareable. When 'umask' (or 'false'), Git will use permissions
reported by umask(2). When '0xxx', where '0xxx' is an octal number,
files in the repository will have this mode value. '0xxx' will override
user's umask value (whereas the other options will only override
@@ -426,7 +426,7 @@ core.sharedRepository::
See linkgit:git-init[1]. False by default.
core.warnAmbiguousRefs::
- If true, git will warn you if the ref name you passed it is ambiguous
+ If true, Git will warn you if the ref name you passed it is ambiguous
and might match multiple refs in the .git/refs/ tree. True by default.
core.compression::
@@ -498,7 +498,7 @@ Common unit suffixes of 'k', 'm', or 'g' are supported.
core.excludesfile::
In addition to '.gitignore' (per-directory) and
- '.git/info/exclude', git looks into this file for patterns
+ '.git/info/exclude', Git looks into this file for patterns
of files which are not meant to be tracked. "`~/`" is expanded
to the value of `$HOME` and "`~user/`" to the specified user's
home directory. Its default value is $XDG_CONFIG_HOME/git/ignore.
@@ -516,7 +516,7 @@ core.askpass::
core.attributesfile::
In addition to '.gitattributes' (per-directory) and
- '.git/info/attributes', git looks into this file for attributes
+ '.git/info/attributes', Git looks into this file for attributes
(see linkgit:gitattributes[5]). Path expansions are made the same
way as for `core.excludesfile`. Its default value is
$XDG_CONFIG_HOME/git/attributes. If $XDG_CONFIG_HOME is either not
@@ -535,9 +535,9 @@ sequence.editor::
When not configured the default commit message editor is used instead.
core.pager::
- The command that git will use to paginate output. Can
+ The command that Git will use to paginate output. Can
be overridden with the `GIT_PAGER` environment
- variable. Note that git sets the `LESS` environment
+ variable. Note that Git sets the `LESS` environment
variable to `FRSX` if it is unset when it runs the
pager. One can change these settings by setting the
`LESS` variable to some other value. Alternately,
@@ -545,11 +545,11 @@ core.pager::
global basis by setting the `core.pager` option.
Setting `core.pager` has no effect on the `LESS`
environment variable behaviour above, so if you want
- to override git's default settings this way, you need
+ to override Git's default settings this way, you need
to be explicit. For example, to disable the S option
in a backward compatible manner, set `core.pager`
to `less -+S`. This will be passed to the shell by
- git, which will translate the final command to
+ Git, which will translate the final command to
`LESS=FRSX less -+S`.
core.whitespace::
@@ -578,7 +578,7 @@ core.whitespace::
does not trigger if the character before such a carriage-return
is not a whitespace (not enabled by default).
* `tabwidth=<n>` tells how many character positions a tab occupies; this
- is relevant for `indent-with-non-tab` and when git fixes `tab-in-indent`
+ is relevant for `indent-with-non-tab` and when Git fixes `tab-in-indent`
errors. The default tab width is 8. Allowed values are 1 to 63.
core.fsyncobjectfiles::
@@ -594,7 +594,7 @@ core.preloadindex::
+
This can speed up operations like 'git diff' and 'git status' especially
on filesystems like NFS that have weak caching semantics and thus
-relatively high IO latencies. With this set to 'true', git will do the
+relatively high IO latencies. With this set to 'true', Git will do the
index comparison to the filesystem data in parallel, allowing
overlapping IO's.
@@ -630,9 +630,9 @@ add.ignore-errors::
add.ignoreErrors::
Tells 'git add' to continue adding files when some files cannot be
added due to indexing errors. Equivalent to the '--ignore-errors'
- option of linkgit:git-add[1]. Older versions of git accept only
+ option of linkgit:git-add[1]. Older versions of Git accept only
`add.ignore-errors`, which does not follow the usual naming
- convention for configuration variables. Newer versions of git
+ convention for configuration variables. Newer versions of Git
honor `add.ignoreErrors` as well.
alias.*::
@@ -640,7 +640,7 @@ alias.*::
after defining "alias.last = cat-file commit HEAD", the invocation
"git last" is equivalent to "git cat-file commit HEAD". To avoid
confusion and troubles with script usage, aliases that
- hide existing git commands are ignored. Arguments are split by
+ hide existing Git commands are ignored. Arguments are split by
spaces, the usual shell quoting and escaping is supported.
quote pair and a backslash can be used to quote them.
+
@@ -687,7 +687,7 @@ branch.autosetupmerge::
branch.autosetuprebase::
When a new branch is created with 'git branch' or 'git checkout'
- that tracks another branch, this variable tells git to set
+ that tracks another branch, this variable tells Git to set
up pull to rebase instead of merge (see "branch.<name>.rebase").
When `never`, rebase is never automatically set to true.
When `local`, rebase is set to true for tracked branches of
@@ -868,7 +868,7 @@ color.status.<slot>::
one of `header` (the header text of the status message),
`added` or `updated` (files which are added but not committed),
`changed` (files which are changed but not added in the index),
- `untracked` (files which are not tracked by git),
+ `untracked` (files which are not tracked by Git),
`branch` (the current branch), or
`nobranch` (the color the 'no branch' warning is shown in, defaulting
to red). The values of these variables may be specified as in
@@ -882,7 +882,7 @@ color.ui::
to `always` if you want all output not intended for machine
consumption to use color, to `true` or `auto` if you want such
output to use color when written to the terminal, or to `false` or
- `never` if you prefer git commands not to use color unless enabled
+ `never` if you prefer Git commands not to use color unless enabled
explicitly with some other configuration or the `--color` option.
column.ui::
@@ -999,7 +999,7 @@ fetch.fsckObjects::
is used instead.
fetch.unpackLimit::
- If the number of objects fetched over the git native
+ If the number of objects fetched over the Git native
transfer is below this
limit, then the objects will be unpacked into loose object
files. However if the number of received objects equals or
@@ -1039,7 +1039,7 @@ format.subjectprefix::
format.signature::
The default for format-patch is to output a signature containing
- the git version number. Use this variable to change that default.
+ the Git version number. Use this variable to change that default.
Set this variable to the empty string ("") to suppress
signature generation.
@@ -1152,7 +1152,7 @@ gitcvs.logfile::
gitcvs.usecrlfattr::
If true, the server will look up the end-of-line conversion
attributes for files to determine the '-k' modes to use. If
- the attributes force git to treat a file as text,
+ the attributes force Git to treat a file as text,
the '-k' mode will be left blank so CVS clients will
treat it as text. If they suppress text conversion, the file
will be set with '-kb' mode, which suppresses any newline munging
@@ -1172,7 +1172,7 @@ gitcvs.allbinary::
gitcvs.dbname::
Database used by git-cvsserver to cache revision information
- derived from the git repository. The exact meaning depends on the
+ derived from the Git repository. The exact meaning depends on the
used database driver, for SQLite (which is the default driver) this
is a filename. Supports variable substitution (see
linkgit:git-cvsserver[1] for details). May not contain semicolons (`;`).
@@ -1384,7 +1384,7 @@ http.proxy::
http.cookiefile::
File containing previously stored cookie lines which should be used
- in the git http session, if they match the server. The file format
+ in the Git http session, if they match the server. The file format
of the file to read cookies from should be plain HTTP headers or
the Netscape/Mozilla cookie file format (see linkgit:curl[1]).
NOTE that the file specified with http.cookiefile is only used as
@@ -1406,7 +1406,7 @@ http.sslKey::
variable.
http.sslCertPasswordProtected::
- Enable git's password prompt for the SSL certificate. Otherwise
+ Enable Git's password prompt for the SSL certificate. Otherwise
OpenSSL will prompt the user, possibly many times, if the
certificate or private key is encrypted. Can be overridden by the
'GIT_SSL_CERT_PASSWORD_PROTECTED' environment variable.
@@ -1453,7 +1453,7 @@ http.noEPSV::
http.useragent::
The HTTP USER_AGENT string presented to an HTTP server. The default
- value represents the version of the client git such as git/1.7.1.
+ value represents the version of the client Git such as git/1.7.1.
This option allows you to override this value to a more common value
such as Mozilla/4.0. This may be necessary, for instance, if
connecting through a firewall that restricts HTTP connections to a set
@@ -1461,7 +1461,7 @@ http.useragent::
Can be overridden by the 'GIT_HTTP_USER_AGENT' environment variable.
i18n.commitEncoding::
- Character encoding the commit messages are stored in; git itself
+ Character encoding the commit messages are stored in; Git itself
does not care per se, but this information is necessary e.g. when
importing commits from emails or in the gitk graphical history
browser (and possibly at other places in the future or in other
@@ -1599,7 +1599,7 @@ mergetool.keepBackup::
`true` (i.e. keep the backup files).
mergetool.keepTemporaries::
- When invoking a custom merge tool, git uses a set of temporary
+ When invoking a custom merge tool, Git uses a set of temporary
files to pass to the tool. If the tool returns an error and this
variable is set to `true`, then these temporary files will be
preserved, otherwise they will be removed after the tool has
@@ -1627,7 +1627,7 @@ displayed.
notes.rewrite.<command>::
When rewriting commits with <command> (currently `amend` or
- `rebase`) and this variable is set to `true`, git
+ `rebase`) and this variable is set to `true`, Git
automatically copies your notes from the original to the
rewritten commit. Defaults to `true`, but see
"notes.rewriteRef" below.
@@ -1707,7 +1707,7 @@ pack.threads::
warning. This is meant to reduce packing time on multiprocessor
machines. The required amount of memory for the delta search window
is however multiplied by the number of threads.
- Specifying 0 will cause git to auto-detect the number of CPU's
+ Specifying 0 will cause Git to auto-detect the number of CPU's
and set the number of threads accordingly.
pack.indexVersion::
@@ -1719,11 +1719,11 @@ pack.indexVersion::
and this config option ignored whenever the corresponding pack is
larger than 2 GB.
+
-If you have an old git that does not understand the version 2 `*.idx` file,
+If you have an old Git that does not understand the version 2 `*.idx` file,
cloning or fetching over a non native protocol (e.g. "http" and "rsync")
that will copy both `*.pack` file and corresponding `*.idx` file from the
other side may give you a repository that cannot be accessed with your
-older version of git. If the `*.pack` file is smaller than 2 GB, however,
+older version of Git. If the `*.pack` file is smaller than 2 GB, however,
you can use linkgit:git-index-pack[1] on the *.pack file to regenerate
the `*.idx` file.
@@ -1738,7 +1738,7 @@ pack.packSizeLimit::
pager.<cmd>::
If the value is boolean, turns on or off pagination of the
- output of a particular git subcommand when writing to a tty.
+ output of a particular Git subcommand when writing to a tty.
Otherwise, turns on pagination for the subcommand using the
pager specified by the value of `pager.<cmd>`. If `--paginate`
or `--no-pager` is specified on the command line, it takes
@@ -1773,7 +1773,7 @@ pull.twohead::
The default merge strategy to use when pulling a single branch.
push.default::
- Defines the action git push should take if no refspec is given
+ Defines the action `git push` should take if no refspec is given
on the command line, no refspec is configured in the remote, and
no refspec is implied by any of the options given on the command
line. Possible values are:
@@ -1913,7 +1913,7 @@ remote.<name>.tagopt::
linkgit:git-fetch[1].
remote.<name>.vcs::
- Setting this to a value <vcs> will cause git to interact with
+ Setting this to a value <vcs> will cause Git to interact with
the remote with the git-remote-<vcs> helper.
remotes.<group>::
@@ -1923,9 +1923,9 @@ remotes.<group>::
repack.usedeltabaseoffset::
By default, linkgit:git-repack[1] creates packs that use
delta-base offset. If you need to share your repository with
- git older than version 1.4.4, either directly or via a dumb
+ Git older than version 1.4.4, either directly or via a dumb
protocol such as http, then you need to set this option to
- "false" and repack. Access from old git versions over the
+ "false" and repack. Access from old Git versions over the
native protocol are unaffected by this option.
rerere.autoupdate::
@@ -1994,7 +1994,7 @@ showbranch.default::
status.relativePaths::
By default, linkgit:git-status[1] shows paths relative to the
current directory. Setting this variable to `false` shows paths
- relative to the repository root (this was the default for git
+ relative to the repository root (this was the default for Git
prior to v1.5.4).
status.showUntrackedFiles::
@@ -2081,7 +2081,7 @@ url.<base>.insteadOf::
large number of repositories, and serves them with multiple
access methods, and some users need to use different access
methods, this feature allows people to specify any of the
- equivalent URLs and have git automatically rewrite the URL to
+ equivalent URLs and have Git automatically rewrite the URL to
the best alternative for the particular user, even for a
never-before-seen repository on the site. When more than one
insteadOf strings match a given URL, the longest match is used.
@@ -2092,11 +2092,11 @@ url.<base>.pushInsteadOf::
resulting URL will be pushed to. In cases where some site serves
a large number of repositories, and serves them with multiple
access methods, some of which do not allow push, this feature
- allows people to specify a pull-only URL and have git
+ allows people to specify a pull-only URL and have Git
automatically use an appropriate URL to push, even for a
never-before-seen repository on the site. When more than one
pushInsteadOf strings match a given URL, the longest match is
- used. If a remote has an explicit pushurl, git will ignore this
+ used. If a remote has an explicit pushurl, Git will ignore this
setting for that remote.
user.email::
diff --git a/Documentation/diff-config.txt b/Documentation/diff-config.txt
index 4314ad0..6d06aa4 100644
--- a/Documentation/diff-config.txt
+++ b/Documentation/diff-config.txt
@@ -99,7 +99,7 @@ diff.renameLimit::
detection; equivalent to the 'git diff' option '-l'.
diff.renames::
- Tells git to detect renames. If set to any boolean value, it
+ Tells Git to detect renames. If set to any boolean value, it
will enable basic rename detection. If set to "copies" or
"copy", it will detect copies, as well.
diff --git a/Documentation/diff-options.txt b/Documentation/diff-options.txt
index 39f2c50..7a87473 100644
--- a/Documentation/diff-options.txt
+++ b/Documentation/diff-options.txt
@@ -283,7 +283,7 @@ few lines that happen to match textually as the context, but as a
single deletion of everything old followed by a single insertion of
everything new, and the number `m` controls this aspect of the -B
option (defaults to 60%). `-B/70%` specifies that less than 30% of the
-original should remain in the result for git to consider it a total
+original should remain in the result for Git to consider it a total
rewrite (i.e. otherwise the resulting patch will be a series of
deletion and insertion mixed together with context lines).
+
@@ -307,7 +307,7 @@ ifdef::git-log[]
endif::git-log[]
If `n` is specified, it is a threshold on the similarity
index (i.e. amount of addition/deletions compared to the
- file's size). For example, `-M90%` means git should consider a
+ file's size). For example, `-M90%` means Git should consider a
delete/add pair to be a rename if more than 90% of the file
hasn't changed. Without a `%` sign, the number is to be read as
a fraction, with a decimal point before it. I.e., `-M5` becomes
diff --git a/Documentation/everyday.txt b/Documentation/everyday.txt
index 6acfd33..e1fba85 100644
--- a/Documentation/everyday.txt
+++ b/Documentation/everyday.txt
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ commands in addition to the above.
<<Repository Administration>> commands are for system
administrators who are responsible for the care and feeding
-of git repositories.
+of Git repositories.
Individual Developer (Standalone)[[Individual Developer (Standalone)]]
@@ -87,7 +87,7 @@ $ git log v2.43.. curses/ <12>
+
<1> create a new topic branch.
<2> revert your botched changes in `curses/ux_audio_oss.c`.
-<3> you need to tell git if you added a new file; removal and
+<3> you need to tell Git if you added a new file; removal and
modification will be caught if you do `git commit -a` later.
<4> to see what changes you are committing.
<5> commit everything as you have tested, with your sign-off.
@@ -332,7 +332,7 @@ Run git-daemon to serve /pub/scm from xinetd.::
------------
$ cat /etc/xinetd.d/git-daemon
# default: off
-# description: The git server offers access to git repositories
+# description: The Git server offers access to Git repositories
service git
{
disable = no
diff --git a/Documentation/git-apply.txt b/Documentation/git-apply.txt
index 634b84e..f605327 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-apply.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-apply.txt
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ Reads the supplied diff output (i.e. "a patch") and applies it to files.
With the `--index` option the patch is also applied to the index, and
with the `--cached` option the patch is only applied to the index.
Without these options, the command applies the patch only to files,
-and does not require them to be in a git repository.
+and does not require them to be in a Git repository.
This command applies the patch but does not create a commit. Use
linkgit:git-am[1] to create commits from patches generated by
@@ -198,7 +198,7 @@ behavior:
* `fix` outputs warnings for a few such errors, and applies the
patch after fixing them (`strip` is a synonym --- the tool
used to consider only trailing whitespace characters as errors, and the
- fix involved 'stripping' them, but modern gits do more).
+ fix involved 'stripping' them, but modern Gits do more).
* `error` outputs warnings for a few such errors, and refuses
to apply the patch.
* `error-all` is similar to `error` but shows all errors.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-archimport.txt b/Documentation/git-archimport.txt
index f4504ba..163b9f6 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-archimport.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-archimport.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-archimport(1)
NAME
----
-git-archimport - Import an Arch repository into git
+git-archimport - Import an Arch repository into Git
SYNOPSIS
@@ -40,13 +40,13 @@ directory. To follow the development of a project that uses Arch, rerun
incremental imports.
While 'git archimport' will try to create sensible branch names for the
-archives that it imports, it is also possible to specify git branch names
-manually. To do so, write a git branch name after each <archive/branch>
+archives that it imports, it is also possible to specify Git branch names
+manually. To do so, write a Git branch name after each <archive/branch>
parameter, separated by a colon. This way, you can shorten the Arch
-branch names and convert Arch jargon to git jargon, for example mapping a
+branch names and convert Arch jargon to Git jargon, for example mapping a
"PROJECT{litdd}devo{litdd}VERSION" branch to "master".
-Associating multiple Arch branches to one git branch is possible; the
+Associating multiple Arch branches to one Git branch is possible; the
result will make the most sense only if no commits are made to the first
branch, after the second branch is created. Still, this is useful to
convert Arch repositories that had been rotated periodically.
@@ -54,14 +54,14 @@ convert Arch repositories that had been rotated periodically.
MERGES
------
-Patch merge data from Arch is used to mark merges in git as well. git
+Patch merge data from Arch is used to mark merges in Git as well. Git
does not care much about tracking patches, and only considers a merge when a
branch incorporates all the commits since the point they forked. The end result
-is that git will have a good idea of how far branches have diverged. So the
+is that Git will have a good idea of how far branches have diverged. So the
import process does lose some patch-trading metadata.
Fortunately, when you try and merge branches imported from Arch,
-git will find a good merge base, and it has a good chance of identifying
+Git will find a good merge base, and it has a good chance of identifying
patches that have been traded out-of-sequence between the branches.
OPTIONS
diff --git a/Documentation/git-archive.txt b/Documentation/git-archive.txt
index 59d73e5..b4c2e24 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-archive.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-archive.txt
@@ -128,7 +128,7 @@ export-ignore::
added to archive files. See linkgit:gitattributes[5] for details.
export-subst::
- If the attribute export-subst is set for a file then git will
+ If the attribute export-subst is set for a file then Git will
expand several placeholders when adding this file to an archive.
See linkgit:gitattributes[5] for details.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-bisect-lk2009.txt b/Documentation/git-bisect-lk2009.txt
index ec4497e..0eed3e3 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-bisect-lk2009.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-bisect-lk2009.txt
@@ -224,7 +224,7 @@ Note that the example that we will use is really a toy example, we
will be looking for the first commit that has a version like
"2.6.26-something", that is the commit that has a "SUBLEVEL = 26" line
in the top level Makefile. This is a toy example because there are
-better ways to find this commit with git than using "git bisect" (for
+better ways to find this commit with Git than using "git bisect" (for
example "git blame" or "git log -S<string>").
Driving a bisection manually
@@ -455,7 +455,7 @@ So only the W and B commits will be kept. Because commits X and Y will
have been removed by rules a) and b) respectively, and because commits
G are removed by rule b) too.
-Note for git users, that it is equivalent as keeping only the commit
+Note for Git users, that it is equivalent as keeping only the commit
given by:
-------------
@@ -710,8 +710,8 @@ Skip algorithm discussed
After step 7) (in the skip algorithm), we could check if the second
commit has been skipped and return it if it is not the case. And in
fact that was the algorithm we used from when "git bisect skip" was
-developed in git version 1.5.4 (released on February 1st 2008) until
-git version 1.6.4 (released July 29th 2009).
+developed in Git version 1.5.4 (released on February 1st 2008) until
+Git version 1.6.4 (released July 29th 2009).
But Ingo Molnar and H. Peter Anvin (another well known linux kernel
developer) both complained that sometimes the best bisection points
@@ -1025,10 +1025,10 @@ And here is what Andreas said about this work-flow <<5>>:
_____________
To give some hard figures, we used to have an average report-to-fix
cycle of 142.6 hours (according to our somewhat weird bug-tracker
-which just measures wall-clock time). Since we moved to git, we've
+which just measures wall-clock time). Since we moved to Git, we've
lowered that to 16.2 hours. Primarily because we can stay on top of
the bug fixing now, and because everyone's jockeying to get to fix
-bugs (we're quite proud of how lazy we are to let git find the bugs
+bugs (we're quite proud of how lazy we are to let Git find the bugs
for us). Each new release results in ~40% fewer bugs (almost certainly
due to how we now feel about writing tests).
_____________
@@ -1228,9 +1228,9 @@ commits in already released history, for example to change the commit
message or the author. And it can also be used instead of git "grafts"
to link a repository with another old repository.
-In fact it's this last feature that "sold" it to the git community, so
-it is now in the "master" branch of git's git repository and it should
-be released in git 1.6.5 in October or November 2009.
+In fact it's this last feature that "sold" it to the Git community, so
+it is now in the "master" branch of Git's Git repository and it should
+be released in Git 1.6.5 in October or November 2009.
One problem with "git replace" is that currently it stores all the
replacements refs in "refs/replace/", but it would be perhaps better
@@ -1324,7 +1324,7 @@ Acknowledgements
----------------
Many thanks to Junio Hamano for his help in reviewing this paper, for
-reviewing the patches I sent to the git mailing list, for discussing
+reviewing the patches I sent to the Git mailing list, for discussing
some ideas and helping me improve them, for improving "git bisect" a
lot and for his awesome work in maintaining and developing Git.
@@ -1337,7 +1337,7 @@ Many thanks to Linus Torvalds for inventing, developing and
evangelizing "git bisect", Git and Linux.
Many thanks to the many other great people who helped one way or
-another when I worked on git, especially to Andreas Ericsson, Johannes
+another when I worked on Git, especially to Andreas Ericsson, Johannes
Schindelin, H. Peter Anvin, Daniel Barkalow, Bill Lear, John Hawley,
Shawn O. Pierce, Jeff King, Sam Vilain, Jon Seymour.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-bisect.txt b/Documentation/git-bisect.txt
index e4f46bc..b4831bb 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-bisect.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-bisect.txt
@@ -169,14 +169,14 @@ the revision as good or bad in the usual manner.
Bisect skip
~~~~~~~~~~~~
-Instead of choosing by yourself a nearby commit, you can ask git
+Instead of choosing by yourself a nearby commit, you can ask Git
to do it for you by issuing the command:
------------
$ git bisect skip # Current version cannot be tested
------------
-But git may eventually be unable to tell the first bad commit among
+But Git may eventually be unable to tell the first bad commit among
a bad commit and one or more skipped commits.
You can even skip a range of commits, instead of just one commit,
diff --git a/Documentation/git-blame.txt b/Documentation/git-blame.txt
index e44173f..9a05c2b 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-blame.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-blame.txt
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ The report does not tell you anything about lines which have been deleted or
replaced; you need to use a tool such as 'git diff' or the "pickaxe"
interface briefly mentioned in the following paragraph.
-Apart from supporting file annotation, git also supports searching the
+Apart from supporting file annotation, Git also supports searching the
development history for when a code snippet occurred in a change. This makes it
possible to track when a code snippet was added to a file, moved or copied
between files, and eventually deleted or replaced. It works by searching for
diff --git a/Documentation/git-branch.txt b/Documentation/git-branch.txt
index 45a225e..d4a9be2 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-branch.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-branch.txt
@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ Note that this will create the new branch, but it will not switch the
working tree to it; use "git checkout <newbranch>" to switch to the
new branch.
-When a local branch is started off a remote-tracking branch, git sets up the
+When a local branch is started off a remote-tracking branch, Git sets up the
branch so that 'git pull' will appropriately merge from
the remote-tracking branch. This behavior may be changed via the global
`branch.autosetupmerge` configuration flag. That setting can be
diff --git a/Documentation/git-bundle.txt b/Documentation/git-bundle.txt
index bc023cc..0417562 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-bundle.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-bundle.txt
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ DESCRIPTION
Some workflows require that one or more branches of development on one
machine be replicated on another machine, but the two machines cannot
-be directly connected, and therefore the interactive git protocols (git,
+be directly connected, and therefore the interactive Git protocols (git,
ssh, rsync, http) cannot be used. This command provides support for
'git fetch' and 'git pull' to operate by packaging objects and references
in an archive at the originating machine, then importing those into
diff --git a/Documentation/git-check-ref-format.txt b/Documentation/git-check-ref-format.txt
index 98009d1..ec1739a 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-check-ref-format.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-check-ref-format.txt
@@ -18,14 +18,14 @@ DESCRIPTION
Checks if a given 'refname' is acceptable, and exits with a non-zero
status if it is not.
-A reference is used in git to specify branches and tags. A
+A reference is used in Git to specify branches and tags. A
branch head is stored in the `refs/heads` hierarchy, while
a tag is stored in the `refs/tags` hierarchy of the ref namespace
(typically in `$GIT_DIR/refs/heads` and `$GIT_DIR/refs/tags`
directories or, as entries in file `$GIT_DIR/packed-refs`
if refs are packed by `git gc`).
-git imposes the following rules on how references are named:
+Git imposes the following rules on how references are named:
. They can include slash `/` for hierarchical (directory)
grouping, but no slash-separated component can begin with a
diff --git a/Documentation/git-checkout.txt b/Documentation/git-checkout.txt
index 6f04d22..8edcdca 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-checkout.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-checkout.txt
@@ -333,7 +333,7 @@ a---b---c---d branch 'master' (refers to commit 'd')
tag 'v2.0' (refers to commit 'b')
------------
-In fact, we can perform all the normal git operations. But, let's look
+In fact, we can perform all the normal Git operations. But, let's look
at what happens when we then checkout master:
------------
@@ -350,7 +350,7 @@ a---b---c---d branch 'master' (refers to commit 'd')
It is important to realize that at this point nothing refers to commit
'f'. Eventually commit 'f' (and by extension commit 'e') will be deleted
-by the routine git garbage collection process, unless we create a reference
+by the routine Git garbage collection process, unless we create a reference
before that happens. If we have not yet moved away from commit 'f',
any of these will create a reference to it:
diff --git a/Documentation/git-clean.txt b/Documentation/git-clean.txt
index 9f42c0d..bdc3ab8 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-clean.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-clean.txt
@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ DESCRIPTION
Cleans the working tree by recursively removing files that are not
under version control, starting from the current directory.
-Normally, only files unknown to git are removed, but if the '-x'
+Normally, only files unknown to Git are removed, but if the '-x'
option is specified, ignored files are also removed. This can, for
example, be useful to remove all build products.
@@ -27,13 +27,13 @@ OPTIONS
-------
-d::
Remove untracked directories in addition to untracked files.
- If an untracked directory is managed by a different git
+ If an untracked directory is managed by a different Git
repository, it is not removed by default. Use -f option twice
if you really want to remove such a directory.
-f::
--force::
- If the git configuration variable clean.requireForce is not set
+ If the Git configuration variable clean.requireForce is not set
to false, 'git clean' will refuse to run unless given -f or -n.
-n::
@@ -60,7 +60,7 @@ OPTIONS
working directory to test a clean build.
-X::
- Remove only files ignored by git. This may be useful to rebuild
+ Remove only files ignored by Git. This may be useful to rebuild
everything from scratch, but keep manually created files.
SEE ALSO
diff --git a/Documentation/git-clone.txt b/Documentation/git-clone.txt
index 597048b..5c16e31 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-clone.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-clone.txt
@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ OPTIONS
--local::
-l::
When the repository to clone from is on a local machine,
- this flag bypasses the normal "git aware" transport
+ this flag bypasses the normal "Git aware" transport
mechanism and clones the repository by making a copy of
HEAD and everything under objects and refs directories.
The files under `.git/objects/` directory are hardlinked
@@ -54,11 +54,11 @@ this is the default, and --local is essentially a no-op. If the
repository is specified as a URL, then this flag is ignored (and we
never use the local optimizations). Specifying `--no-local` will
override the default when `/path/to/repo` is given, using the regular
-git transport instead.
+Git transport instead.
+
To force copying instead of hardlinking (which may be desirable if you
are trying to make a back-up of your repository), but still avoid the
-usual "git aware" transport mechanism, `--no-hardlinks` can be used.
+usual "Git aware" transport mechanism, `--no-hardlinks` can be used.
--no-hardlinks::
Optimize the cloning process from a repository on a
@@ -76,9 +76,9 @@ usual "git aware" transport mechanism, `--no-hardlinks` can be used.
*NOTE*: this is a possibly dangerous operation; do *not* use
it unless you understand what it does. If you clone your
repository using this option and then delete branches (or use any
-other git command that makes any existing commit unreferenced) in the
+other Git command that makes any existing commit unreferenced) in the
source repository, some objects may become unreferenced (or dangling).
-These objects may be removed by normal git operations (such as `git commit`)
+These objects may be removed by normal Git operations (such as `git commit`)
which automatically call `git gc --auto`. (See linkgit:git-gc[1].)
If these objects are removed and were referenced by the cloned repository,
then the cloned repository will become corrupt.
@@ -213,8 +213,8 @@ objects from the source repository into a pack in the cloned repository.
--separate-git-dir=<git dir>::
Instead of placing the cloned repository where it is supposed
to be, place the cloned repository at the specified directory,
- then make a filesytem-agnostic git symbolic link to there.
- The result is git repository can be separated from working
+ then make a filesytem-agnostic Git symbolic link to there.
+ The result is Git repository can be separated from working
tree.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-commit-tree.txt b/Documentation/git-commit-tree.txt
index a221169..86ef56e 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-commit-tree.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-commit-tree.txt
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ While a tree represents a particular directory state of a working
directory, a commit represents that state in "time", and explains how
to get there.
-Normally a commit would identify a new "HEAD" state, and while git
+Normally a commit would identify a new "HEAD" state, and while Git
doesn't care where you save the note about that state, in practice we
tend to just write the result to the file that is pointed at by
`.git/HEAD`, so that we can always see what the last committed
diff --git a/Documentation/git-commit.txt b/Documentation/git-commit.txt
index 41b27da..0eb79cc 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-commit.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-commit.txt
@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@ The content to be added can be specified in several ways:
3. by listing files as arguments to the 'commit' command, in which
case the commit will ignore changes staged in the index, and instead
record the current content of the listed files (which must already
- be known to git);
+ be known to Git);
4. by using the -a switch with the 'commit' command to automatically
"add" changes from all known files (i.e. all files that are already
@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@ OPTIONS
--all::
Tell the command to automatically stage files that have
been modified and deleted, but new files you have not
- told git about are not affected.
+ told Git about are not affected.
-p::
--patch::
@@ -404,7 +404,7 @@ Though not required, it's a good idea to begin the commit message
with a single short (less than 50 character) line summarizing the
change, followed by a blank line and then a more thorough description.
The text up to the first blank line in a commit message is treated
-as the commit title, and that title is used throughout git.
+as the commit title, and that title is used throughout Git.
For example, linkgit:git-format-patch[1] turns a commit into email, and it uses
the title on the Subject line and the rest of the commit in the body.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-credential-cache.txt b/Documentation/git-credential-cache.txt
index eeff5fa..89b7306 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-credential-cache.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-credential-cache.txt
@@ -14,13 +14,13 @@ git config credential.helper 'cache [options]'
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-This command caches credentials in memory for use by future git
+This command caches credentials in memory for use by future Git
programs. The stored credentials never touch the disk, and are forgotten
after a configurable timeout. The cache is accessible over a Unix
domain socket, restricted to the current user by filesystem permissions.
You probably don't want to invoke this command directly; it is meant to
-be used as a credential helper by other parts of git. See
+be used as a credential helper by other parts of Git. See
linkgit:gitcredentials[7] or `EXAMPLES` below.
OPTIONS
diff --git a/Documentation/git-credential-store.txt b/Documentation/git-credential-store.txt
index b27c03c..8481cae 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-credential-store.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-credential-store.txt
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ security tradeoff, try linkgit:git-credential-cache[1], or find a helper
that integrates with secure storage provided by your operating system.
This command stores credentials indefinitely on disk for use by future
-git programs.
+Git programs.
You probably don't want to invoke this command directly; it is meant to
be used as a credential helper by other parts of git. See
@@ -63,11 +63,11 @@ stored on its own line as a URL like:
https://user:pass@example.com
------------------------------
-When git needs authentication for a particular URL context,
+When Git needs authentication for a particular URL context,
credential-store will consider that context a pattern to match against
each entry in the credentials file. If the protocol, hostname, and
username (if we already have one) match, then the password is returned
-to git. See the discussion of configuration in linkgit:gitcredentials[7]
+to Git. See the discussion of configuration in linkgit:gitcredentials[7]
for more information.
GIT
diff --git a/Documentation/git-credential.txt b/Documentation/git-credential.txt
index 810e957..472f00f 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-credential.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-credential.txt
@@ -18,9 +18,9 @@ Git has an internal interface for storing and retrieving credentials
from system-specific helpers, as well as prompting the user for
usernames and passwords. The git-credential command exposes this
interface to scripts which may want to retrieve, store, or prompt for
-credentials in the same manner as git. The design of this scriptable
+credentials in the same manner as Git. The design of this scriptable
interface models the internal C API; see
-link:technical/api-credentials.txt[the git credential API] for more
+link:technical/api-credentials.txt[the Git credential API] for more
background on the concepts.
git-credential takes an "action" option on the command-line (one of
@@ -74,7 +74,7 @@ infomation it has):
password=secr3t
+
In most cases, this means the attributes given in the input will be
-repeated in the output, but git may also modify the credential
+repeated in the output, but Git may also modify the credential
description, for example by removing the `path` attribute when the
protocol is HTTP(s) and `credential.useHttpPath` is false.
+
diff --git a/Documentation/git-cvsexportcommit.txt b/Documentation/git-cvsexportcommit.txt
index a671e22..00154b6 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-cvsexportcommit.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-cvsexportcommit.txt
@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
Exports a commit from Git to a CVS checkout, making it easier
-to merge patches from a git repository into a CVS repository.
+to merge patches from a Git repository into a CVS repository.
Specify the name of a CVS checkout using the -w switch or execute it
from the root of the CVS working copy. In the latter case GIT_DIR must
@@ -71,7 +71,7 @@ OPTIONS
-w::
Specify the location of the CVS checkout to use for the export. This
option does not require GIT_DIR to be set before execution if the
- current directory is within a git repository. The default is the
+ current directory is within a Git repository. The default is the
value of 'cvsexportcommit.cvsdir'.
-W::
diff --git a/Documentation/git-cvsimport.txt b/Documentation/git-cvsimport.txt
index 9d5353e..1786d9d 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-cvsimport.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-cvsimport.txt
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-Imports a CVS repository into git. It will either create a new
+Imports a CVS repository into Git. It will either create a new
repository, or incrementally import into an existing one.
Splitting the CVS log into patch sets is done by 'cvsps'.
@@ -59,18 +59,18 @@ OPTIONS
`CVS/Repository`.
-C <target-dir>::
- The git repository to import to. If the directory doesn't
+ The Git repository to import to. If the directory doesn't
exist, it will be created. Default is the current directory.
-r <remote>::
- The git remote to import this CVS repository into.
+ The Git remote to import this CVS repository into.
Moves all CVS branches into remotes/<remote>/<branch>
akin to the way 'git clone' uses 'origin' by default.
-o <branch-for-HEAD>::
When no remote is specified (via -r) the 'HEAD' branch
- from CVS is imported to the 'origin' branch within the git
- repository, as 'HEAD' already has a special meaning for git.
+ from CVS is imported to the 'origin' branch within the Git
+ repository, as 'HEAD' already has a special meaning for Git.
When a remote is specified the 'HEAD' branch is named
remotes/<remote>/master mirroring 'git clone' behaviour.
Use this option if you want to import into a different
diff --git a/Documentation/git-cvsserver.txt b/Documentation/git-cvsserver.txt
index 36d069b..7ca64b3 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-cvsserver.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-cvsserver.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-cvsserver(1)
NAME
----
-git-cvsserver - A CVS server emulator for git
+git-cvsserver - A CVS server emulator for Git
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -60,7 +60,7 @@ unless '--export-all' was given, too.
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-This application is a CVS emulation layer for git.
+This application is a CVS emulation layer for Git.
It is highly functional. However, not all methods are implemented,
and for those methods that are implemented,
@@ -160,9 +160,9 @@ with CVS_SERVER (and shouldn't) as 'git-shell' understands `cvs` to mean
Note: you need to ensure each user that is going to invoke 'git-cvsserver' has
write access to the log file and to the database (see
<<dbbackend,Database Backend>>. If you want to offer write access over
-SSH, the users of course also need write access to the git repository itself.
+SSH, the users of course also need write access to the Git repository itself.
-You also need to ensure that each repository is "bare" (without a git index
+You also need to ensure that each repository is "bare" (without a Git index
file) for `cvs commit` to work. See linkgit:gitcvs-migration[7].
[[configaccessmethod]]
@@ -181,7 +181,7 @@ allowing access over SSH.
3. If you didn't specify the CVSROOT/CVS_SERVER directly in the checkout command,
automatically saving it in your 'CVS/Root' files, then you need to set them
explicitly in your environment. CVSROOT should be set as per normal, but the
- directory should point at the appropriate git repo. As above, for SSH clients
+ directory should point at the appropriate Git repo. As above, for SSH clients
_not_ restricted to 'git-shell', CVS_SERVER should be set to 'git-cvsserver'.
+
--
@@ -210,7 +210,7 @@ allowing access over SSH.
Database Backend
----------------
-'git-cvsserver' uses one database per git head (i.e. CVS module) to
+'git-cvsserver' uses one database per Git head (i.e. CVS module) to
store information about the repository to maintain consistent
CVS revision numbers. The database needs to be
updated (i.e. written to) after every commit.
@@ -225,7 +225,7 @@ the pserver method), 'git-cvsserver' should have write access to
the database to work reliably (otherwise you need to make sure
that the database is up-to-date any time 'git-cvsserver' is executed).
-By default it uses SQLite databases in the git directory, named
+By default it uses SQLite databases in the Git directory, named
`gitcvs.<module_name>.sqlite`. Note that the SQLite backend creates
temporary files in the same directory as the database file on
write so it might not be enough to grant the users using
@@ -291,14 +291,14 @@ Variable substitution
In `dbdriver` and `dbuser` you can use the following variables:
%G::
- git directory name
+ Git directory name
%g::
- git directory name, where all characters except for
+ Git directory name, where all characters except for
alpha-numeric ones, `.`, and `-` are replaced with
`_` (this should make it easier to use the directory
name in a filename if wanted)
%m::
- CVS module/git head name
+ CVS module/Git head name
%a::
access method (one of "ext" or "pserver")
%u::
diff --git a/Documentation/git-daemon.txt b/Documentation/git-daemon.txt
index 80de4f6..77da564 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-daemon.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-daemon.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-daemon(1)
NAME
----
-git-daemon - A really simple server for git repositories
+git-daemon - A really simple server for Git repositories
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -22,12 +22,12 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-A really simple TCP git daemon that normally listens on port "DEFAULT_GIT_PORT"
+A really simple TCP Git daemon that normally listens on port "DEFAULT_GIT_PORT"
aka 9418. It waits for a connection asking for a service, and will serve
that service if it is enabled.
It verifies that the directory has the magic file "git-daemon-export-ok", and
-it will refuse to export any git directory that hasn't explicitly been marked
+it will refuse to export any Git directory that hasn't explicitly been marked
for export this way (unless the '--export-all' parameter is specified). If you
pass some directory paths as 'git daemon' arguments, you can further restrict
the offers to a whitelist comprising of those.
@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@ By default, only `upload-pack` service is enabled, which serves
from 'git fetch', 'git pull', and 'git clone'.
This is ideally suited for read-only updates, i.e., pulling from
-git repositories.
+Git repositories.
An `upload-archive` also exists to serve 'git archive'.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-describe.txt b/Documentation/git-describe.txt
index 72d6bb6..32da244 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-describe.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-describe.txt
@@ -131,7 +131,7 @@ closest tagname without any suffix:
Note that the suffix you get if you type these commands today may be
longer than what Linus saw above when he ran these commands, as your
-git repository may have new commits whose object names begin with
+Git repository may have new commits whose object names begin with
975b that did not exist back then, and "-g975b" suffix alone may not
be sufficient to disambiguate these commits.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-diff.txt b/Documentation/git-diff.txt
index f8c0601..a7b4620 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-diff.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-diff.txt
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ between two files on disk.
This form is to view the changes you made relative to
the index (staging area for the next commit). In other
- words, the differences are what you _could_ tell git to
+ words, the differences are what you _could_ tell Git to
further add to the index but you still haven't. You can
stage these changes by using linkgit:git-add[1].
+
diff --git a/Documentation/git-difftool.txt b/Documentation/git-difftool.txt
index 73ca702..e0e12e9 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-difftool.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-difftool.txt
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-'git difftool' is a git command that allows you to compare and edit files
+'git difftool' is a Git command that allows you to compare and edit files
between revisions using common diff tools. 'git difftool' is a frontend
to 'git diff' and accepts the same options and arguments. See
linkgit:git-diff[1].
diff --git a/Documentation/git-fetch.txt b/Documentation/git-fetch.txt
index b41d7c1..e08a028 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-fetch.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-fetch.txt
@@ -80,7 +80,7 @@ Using --recurse-submodules can only fetch new commits in already checked
out submodules right now. When e.g. upstream added a new submodule in the
just fetched commits of the superproject the submodule itself can not be
fetched, making it impossible to check out that submodule later without
-having to do a fetch again. This is expected to be fixed in a future git
+having to do a fetch again. This is expected to be fixed in a future Git
version.
SEE ALSO
diff --git a/Documentation/git-filter-branch.txt b/Documentation/git-filter-branch.txt
index e2301f5..dfd12c9 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-filter-branch.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-filter-branch.txt
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-Lets you rewrite git revision history by rewriting the branches mentioned
+Lets you rewrite Git revision history by rewriting the branches mentioned
in the <rev-list options>, applying custom filters on each revision.
Those filters can modify each tree (e.g. removing a file or running
a perl rewrite on all files) or information about each commit.
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ The command will only rewrite the _positive_ refs mentioned in the
command line (e.g. if you pass 'a..b', only 'b' will be rewritten).
If you specify no filters, the commits will be recommitted without any
changes, which would normally have no effect. Nevertheless, this may be
-useful in the future for compensating for some git bugs or such,
+useful in the future for compensating for some Git bugs or such,
therefore such a usage is permitted.
*NOTE*: This command honors `.git/info/grafts` file and refs in
@@ -374,7 +374,7 @@ git-filter-branch is often used to get rid of a subset of files,
usually with some combination of `--index-filter` and
`--subdirectory-filter`. People expect the resulting repository to
be smaller than the original, but you need a few more steps to
-actually make it smaller, because git tries hard not to lose your
+actually make it smaller, because Git tries hard not to lose your
objects until you tell it to. First make sure that:
* You really removed all variants of a filename, if a blob was moved
diff --git a/Documentation/git-format-patch.txt b/Documentation/git-format-patch.txt
index 9a914d0..3a62f50 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-format-patch.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-format-patch.txt
@@ -208,14 +208,14 @@ The expected use case of this is to write supporting explanation for
the commit that does not belong to the commit log message proper,
and include it with the patch submission. While one can simply write
these explanations after `format-patch` has run but before sending,
-keeping them as git notes allows them to be maintained between versions
+keeping them as Git notes allows them to be maintained between versions
of the patch series (but see the discussion of the `notes.rewrite`
configuration options in linkgit:git-notes[1] to use this workflow).
--[no]-signature=<signature>::
Add a signature to each message produced. Per RFC 3676 the signature
is separated from the body by a line with '-- ' on it. If the
- signature option is omitted the signature defaults to the git version
+ signature option is omitted the signature defaults to the Git version
number.
--suffix=.<sfx>::
@@ -389,7 +389,7 @@ Thunderbird
~~~~~~~~~~~
By default, Thunderbird will both wrap emails as well as flag
them as being 'format=flowed', both of which will make the
-resulting email unusable by git.
+resulting email unusable by Git.
There are three different approaches: use an add-on to turn off line wraps,
configure Thunderbird to not mangle patches, or use
@@ -525,8 +525,8 @@ $ git format-patch -M -B origin
Additionally, it detects and handles renames and complete rewrites
intelligently to produce a renaming patch. A renaming patch reduces
the amount of text output, and generally makes it easier to review.
-Note that non-git "patch" programs won't understand renaming patches, so
-use it only when you know the recipient uses git to apply your patch.
+Note that non-Git "patch" programs won't understand renaming patches, so
+use it only when you know the recipient uses Git to apply your patch.
* Extract three topmost commits from the current branch and format them
as e-mailable patches:
diff --git a/Documentation/git-fsck.txt b/Documentation/git-fsck.txt
index da348fc..eff9188 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-fsck.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-fsck.txt
@@ -56,7 +56,7 @@ index file, all SHA1 references in `refs` namespace, and all reflogs
($GIT_DIR/objects), but also the ones found in alternate
object pools listed in GIT_ALTERNATE_OBJECT_DIRECTORIES
or $GIT_DIR/objects/info/alternates,
- and in packed git archives found in $GIT_DIR/objects/pack
+ and in packed Git archives found in $GIT_DIR/objects/pack
and corresponding pack subdirectories in alternate
object pools. This is now default; you can turn it off
with --no-full.
@@ -64,8 +64,8 @@ index file, all SHA1 references in `refs` namespace, and all reflogs
--strict::
Enable more strict checking, namely to catch a file mode
recorded with g+w bit set, which was created by older
- versions of git. Existing repositories, including the
- Linux kernel, git itself, and sparse repository have old
+ versions of Git. Existing repositories, including the
+ Linux kernel, Git itself, and sparse repository have old
objects that triggers this check, but it is recommended
to check new projects with this flag.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-grep.txt b/Documentation/git-grep.txt
index cfecf84..50d46e1 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-grep.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-grep.txt
@@ -61,7 +61,7 @@ OPTIONS
blobs registered in the index file.
--no-index::
- Search files in the current directory that is not managed by git.
+ Search files in the current directory that is not managed by Git.
--untracked::
In addition to searching in the tracked files in the working
diff --git a/Documentation/git-gui.txt b/Documentation/git-gui.txt
index 0041994..8144527 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-gui.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-gui.txt
@@ -102,7 +102,7 @@ Examples
SEE ALSO
--------
linkgit:gitk[1]::
- The git repository browser. Shows branches, commit history
+ The Git repository browser. Shows branches, commit history
and file differences. gitk is the utility started by
'git gui''s Repository Visualize actions.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-hash-object.txt b/Documentation/git-hash-object.txt
index 4b0a502..02c1f12 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-hash-object.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-hash-object.txt
@@ -40,7 +40,7 @@ OPTIONS
--path::
Hash object as it were located at the given path. The location of
file does not directly influence on the hash value, but path is
- used to determine what git filters should be applied to the object
+ used to determine what Git filters should be applied to the object
before it can be placed to the object database, and, as result of
applying filters, the actual blob put into the object database may
differ from the given file. This option is mainly useful for hashing
diff --git a/Documentation/git-help.txt b/Documentation/git-help.txt
index 9e0b3f6..e07b6dc 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-help.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-help.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-help(1)
NAME
----
-git-help - display help information about git
+git-help - Display help information about Git
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -14,13 +14,13 @@ DESCRIPTION
-----------
With no options and no COMMAND given, the synopsis of the 'git'
-command and a list of the most commonly used git commands are printed
+command and a list of the most commonly used Git commands are printed
on the standard output.
If the option '--all' or '-a' is given, then all available commands are
printed on the standard output.
-If a git command is named, a manual page for that command is brought
+If a Git subcommand is named, a manual page for that subcommand is brought
up. The 'man' program is used by default for this purpose, but this
can be overridden by other options or configuration variables.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-http-backend.txt b/Documentation/git-http-backend.txt
index f4e0741..7b1e85c 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-http-backend.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-http-backend.txt
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ and the backwards-compatible dumb HTTP protocol, as well as clients
pushing using the smart HTTP protocol.
It verifies that the directory has the magic file
-"git-daemon-export-ok", and it will refuse to export any git directory
+"git-daemon-export-ok", and it will refuse to export any Git directory
that hasn't explicitly been marked for export this way (unless the
GIT_HTTP_EXPORT_ALL environmental variable is set).
diff --git a/Documentation/git-http-fetch.txt b/Documentation/git-http-fetch.txt
index 070cd1e..21a33d2 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-http-fetch.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-http-fetch.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-http-fetch(1)
NAME
----
-git-http-fetch - Download from a remote git repository via HTTP
+git-http-fetch - Download from a remote Git repository via HTTP
SYNOPSIS
@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-Downloads a remote git repository via HTTP.
+Downloads a remote Git repository via HTTP.
*NOTE*: use of this command without -a is deprecated. The -a
behaviour will become the default in a future release.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-index-pack.txt b/Documentation/git-index-pack.txt
index 39e6d0d..36adc5f 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-index-pack.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-index-pack.txt
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ DESCRIPTION
Reads a packed archive (.pack) from the specified file, and
builds a pack index file (.idx) for it. The packed archive
together with the pack index can then be placed in the
-objects/pack/ directory of a git repository.
+objects/pack/ directory of a Git repository.
OPTIONS
@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ OPTIONS
When this flag is provided, the pack is read from stdin
instead and a copy is then written to <pack-file>. If
<pack-file> is not specified, the pack is written to
- objects/pack/ directory of the current git repository with
+ objects/pack/ directory of the current Git repository with
a default name determined from the pack content. If
<pack-file> is not specified consider using --keep to
prevent a race condition between this process and
@@ -81,7 +81,7 @@ OPTIONS
This is meant to reduce packing time on multiprocessor
machines. The required amount of memory for the delta search
window is however multiplied by the number of threads.
- Specifying 0 will cause git to auto-detect the number of CPU's
+ Specifying 0 will cause Git to auto-detect the number of CPU's
and use maximum 3 threads.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-init-db.txt b/Documentation/git-init-db.txt
index a21e346..648a6cd 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-init-db.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-init-db.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-init-db(1)
NAME
----
-git-init-db - Creates an empty git repository
+git-init-db - Creates an empty Git repository
SYNOPSIS
diff --git a/Documentation/git-init.txt b/Documentation/git-init.txt
index 9ac2bba..afd721e 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-init.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-init.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-init(1)
NAME
----
-git-init - Create an empty git repository or reinitialize an existing one
+git-init - Create an empty Git repository or reinitialize an existing one
SYNOPSIS
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-This command creates an empty git repository - basically a `.git`
+This command creates an empty Git repository - basically a `.git`
directory with subdirectories for `objects`, `refs/heads`,
`refs/tags`, and template files. An initial `HEAD` file that
references the HEAD of the master branch is also created.
@@ -58,19 +58,19 @@ DIRECTORY" section below.)
--separate-git-dir=<git dir>::
Instead of initializing the repository where it is supposed to be,
-place a filesytem-agnostic git symbolic link there, pointing to the
-specified git path, and initialize a git repository at the path. The
-result is git repository can be separated from working tree. If this
+place a filesytem-agnostic Git symbolic link there, pointing to the
+specified path, and initialize a Git repository at the path. The
+result is Git repository can be separated from working tree. If this
is reinitialization, the repository will be moved to the specified
path.
--shared[=(false|true|umask|group|all|world|everybody|0xxx)]::
-Specify that the git repository is to be shared amongst several users. This
+Specify that the Git repository is to be shared amongst several users. This
allows users belonging to the same group to push into that
repository. When specified, the config variable "core.sharedRepository" is
set so that files and directories under `$GIT_DIR` are created with the
-requested permissions. When not specified, git will use permissions reported
+requested permissions. When not specified, Git will use permissions reported
by umask(2).
The option can have the following values, defaulting to 'group' if no value
@@ -130,7 +130,7 @@ The suggested patterns and hook files are all modifiable and extensible.
EXAMPLES
--------
-Start a new git repository for an existing code base::
+Start a new Git repository for an existing code base::
+
----------------
$ cd /path/to/my/codebase
diff --git a/Documentation/git-log.txt b/Documentation/git-log.txt
index 22c0d6e..69db578 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-log.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-log.txt
@@ -64,7 +64,7 @@ produced by --stat etc.
--log-size::
Before the log message print out its size in bytes. Intended
- mainly for porcelain tools consumption. If git is unable to
+ mainly for porcelain tools consumption. If Git is unable to
produce a valid value size is set to zero.
Note that only message is considered, if also a diff is shown
its size is not included.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-ls-files.txt b/Documentation/git-ls-files.txt
index 4b28292..0bdebff 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-ls-files.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-ls-files.txt
@@ -92,7 +92,7 @@ OPTIONS
directory and its subdirectories in <file>.
--exclude-standard::
- Add the standard git exclusions: .git/info/exclude, .gitignore
+ Add the standard Git exclusions: .git/info/exclude, .gitignore
in each directory, and the user's global exclusion file.
--error-unmatch::
diff --git a/Documentation/git-merge-index.txt b/Documentation/git-merge-index.txt
index e0df1b3..0c80cec 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-merge-index.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-merge-index.txt
@@ -41,13 +41,13 @@ If 'git merge-index' is called with multiple <file>s (or -a) then it
processes them in turn only stopping if merge returns a non-zero exit
code.
-Typically this is run with a script calling git's imitation of
+Typically this is run with a script calling Git's imitation of
the 'merge' command from the RCS package.
A sample script called 'git merge-one-file' is included in the
distribution.
-ALERT ALERT ALERT! The git "merge object order" is different from the
+ALERT ALERT ALERT! The Git "merge object order" is different from the
RCS 'merge' program merge object order. In the above ordering, the
original is first. But the argument order to the 3-way merge program
'merge' is to have the original in the middle. Don't ask me why.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-merge.txt b/Documentation/git-merge.txt
index d34ea3c..c852a26 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-merge.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-merge.txt
@@ -178,10 +178,10 @@ of the merge. Among the changes made to the common ancestor's version,
non-overlapping ones (that is, you changed an area of the file while the
other side left that area intact, or vice versa) are incorporated in the
final result verbatim. When both sides made changes to the same area,
-however, git cannot randomly pick one side over the other, and asks you to
+however, Git cannot randomly pick one side over the other, and asks you to
resolve it by leaving what both sides did to that area.
-By default, git uses the same style as the one used by the "merge" program
+By default, Git uses the same style as the one used by the "merge" program
from the RCS suite to present such a conflicted hunk, like this:
------------
diff --git a/Documentation/git-mergetool--lib.txt b/Documentation/git-mergetool--lib.txt
index f98a41b..055550b 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-mergetool--lib.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-mergetool--lib.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-mergetool{litdd}lib(1)
NAME
----
-git-mergetool--lib - Common git merge tool shell scriptlets
+git-mergetool--lib - Common Git merge tool shell scriptlets
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ Porcelain-ish scripts and/or are writing new ones.
The 'git-mergetool{litdd}lib' scriptlet is designed to be sourced (using
`.`) by other shell scripts to set up functions for working
-with git merge tools.
+with Git merge tools.
Before sourcing 'git-mergetool{litdd}lib', your script must set `TOOL_MODE`
to define the operation mode for the functions listed below.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-mktag.txt b/Documentation/git-mktag.txt
index 65e167a..3ca158b 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-mktag.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-mktag.txt
@@ -28,9 +28,9 @@ A tag signature file has a very simple fixed format: four lines of
tagger <tagger>
followed by some 'optional' free-form message (some tags created
-by older git may not have `tagger` line). The message, when
+by older Git may not have `tagger` line). The message, when
exists, is separated by a blank line from the header. The
-message part may contain a signature that git itself doesn't
+message part may contain a signature that Git itself doesn't
care about, but that can be verified with gpg.
GIT
diff --git a/Documentation/git-p4.txt b/Documentation/git-p4.txt
index beff622..3417cb3 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-p4.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-p4.txt
@@ -18,13 +18,13 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
This command provides a way to interact with p4 repositories
-using git.
+using Git.
-Create a new git repository from an existing p4 repository using
+Create a new Git repository from an existing p4 repository using
'git p4 clone', giving it one or more p4 depot paths. Incorporate
new commits from p4 changes with 'git p4 sync'. The 'sync' command
is also used to include new branches from other p4 depot paths.
-Submit git changes back to p4 using 'git p4 submit'. The command
+Submit Git changes back to p4 using 'git p4 submit'. The command
'git p4 rebase' does a sync plus rebases the current branch onto
the updated p4 remote branch.
@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@ EXAMPLE
$ git p4 clone //depot/path/project
------------
-* Do some work in the newly created git repository:
+* Do some work in the newly created Git repository:
+
------------
$ cd project
@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ $ vi foo.h
$ git commit -a -m "edited foo.h"
------------
-* Update the git repository with recent changes from p4, rebasing your
+* Update the Git repository with recent changes from p4, rebasing your
work on top:
+
------------
@@ -64,21 +64,21 @@ COMMANDS
Clone
~~~~~
-Generally, 'git p4 clone' is used to create a new git directory
+Generally, 'git p4 clone' is used to create a new Git directory
from an existing p4 repository:
------------
$ git p4 clone //depot/path/project
------------
This:
-1. Creates an empty git repository in a subdirectory called 'project'.
+1. Creates an empty Git repository in a subdirectory called 'project'.
+
2. Imports the full contents of the head revision from the given p4
-depot path into a single commit in the git branch 'refs/remotes/p4/master'.
+depot path into a single commit in the Git branch 'refs/remotes/p4/master'.
+
3. Creates a local branch, 'master' from this remote and checks it out.
-To reproduce the entire p4 history in git, use the '@all' modifier on
+To reproduce the entire p4 history in Git, use the '@all' modifier on
the depot path:
------------
$ git p4 clone //depot/path/project@all
@@ -88,13 +88,13 @@ $ git p4 clone //depot/path/project@all
Sync
~~~~
As development continues in the p4 repository, those changes can
-be included in the git repository using:
+be included in the Git repository using:
------------
$ git p4 sync
------------
-This command finds new changes in p4 and imports them as git commits.
+This command finds new changes in p4 and imports them as Git commits.
-P4 repositories can be added to an existing git repository using
+P4 repositories can be added to an existing Git repository using
'git p4 sync' too:
------------
$ mkdir repo-git
@@ -103,14 +103,14 @@ $ git init
$ git p4 sync //path/in/your/perforce/depot
------------
This imports the specified depot into
-'refs/remotes/p4/master' in an existing git repository. The
+'refs/remotes/p4/master' in an existing Git repository. The
'--branch' option can be used to specify a different branch to
be used for the p4 content.
-If a git repository includes branches 'refs/remotes/origin/p4', these
+If a Git repository includes branches 'refs/remotes/origin/p4', these
will be fetched and consulted first during a 'git p4 sync'. Since
importing directly from p4 is considerably slower than pulling changes
-from a git remote, this can be useful in a multi-developer environment.
+from a Git remote, this can be useful in a multi-developer environment.
Rebase
@@ -127,13 +127,13 @@ $ git p4 rebase
Submit
~~~~~~
-Submitting changes from a git repository back to the p4 repository
+Submitting changes from a Git repository back to the p4 repository
requires a separate p4 client workspace. This should be specified
-using the 'P4CLIENT' environment variable or the git configuration
+using the 'P4CLIENT' environment variable or the Git configuration
variable 'git-p4.client'. The p4 client must exist, but the client root
will be created and populated if it does not already exist.
-To submit all changes that are in the current git branch but not in
+To submit all changes that are in the current Git branch but not in
the 'p4/master' branch, use:
------------
$ git p4 submit
@@ -149,7 +149,7 @@ be overridden using the '--origin=' command-line option.
The p4 changes will be created as the user invoking 'git p4 submit'. The
'--preserve-user' option will cause ownership to be modified
-according to the author of the git commit. This option requires admin
+according to the author of the Git commit. This option requires admin
privileges in p4, which can be granted using 'p4 protect'.
@@ -178,7 +178,7 @@ subsequent 'sync' operations.
with an initial clone, no HEAD will be checked out.
+
This example imports a new remote "p4/proj2" into an existing
-git repository:
+Git repository:
+
----
$ git init
@@ -199,11 +199,11 @@ git repository:
--detect-labels::
Query p4 for labels associated with the depot paths, and add
- them as tags in git. Limited usefulness as only imports labels
+ them as tags in Git. Limited usefulness as only imports labels
associated with new changelists. Deprecated.
--import-labels::
- Import labels from p4 into git.
+ Import labels from p4 into Git.
--import-local::
By default, p4 branches are stored in 'refs/remotes/p4/',
@@ -219,12 +219,12 @@ git repository:
specifier.
--keep-path::
- The mapping of file names from the p4 depot path to git, by
+ The mapping of file names from the p4 depot path to Git, by
default, involves removing the entire depot path. With this
- option, the full p4 depot path is retained in git. For example,
+ option, the full p4 depot path is retained in Git. For example,
path '//depot/main/foo/bar.c', when imported from
'//depot/main/', becomes 'foo/bar.c'. With '--keep-path', the
- git path is instead 'depot/main/foo/bar.c'.
+ Git path is instead 'depot/main/foo/bar.c'.
--use-client-spec::
Use a client spec to find the list of interesting files in p4.
@@ -236,7 +236,7 @@ These options can be used in an initial 'clone', along with the 'sync'
options described above.
--destination <directory>::
- Where to create the git repository. If not provided, the last
+ Where to create the Git repository. If not provided, the last
component in the p4 depot path is used to create a new
directory.
@@ -266,12 +266,12 @@ These options can be used to modify 'git p4 submit' behavior.
requires p4 admin privileges.
--export-labels::
- Export tags from git as p4 labels. Tags found in git are applied
+ Export tags from Git as p4 labels. Tags found in Git are applied
to the perforce working directory.
--dry-run, -n::
Show just what commits would be submitted to p4; do not change
- state in git or p4.
+ state in Git or p4.
--prepare-p4-only::
Apply a commit to the p4 workspace, opening, adding and deleting
@@ -312,12 +312,12 @@ p4 revision specifier on the end:
"//depot/proj1@all //depot/proj2@all"::
Import all changes from both named depot paths into a single
repository. Only files below these directories are included.
- There is not a subdirectory in git for each "proj1" and "proj2".
+ There is not a subdirectory in Git for each "proj1" and "proj2".
You must use the '--destination' option when specifying more
than one depot path. The revision specifier must be specified
identically on each depot path. If there are files in the
depot paths with the same name, the path with the most recently
- updated version of the file is the one that appears in git.
+ updated version of the file is the one that appears in Git.
See 'p4 help revisions' for the full syntax of p4 revision specifiers.
@@ -334,11 +334,11 @@ configuration file. This allows future 'git p4 submit' commands to
work properly; the submit command looks only at the variable and does
not have a command-line option.
-The full syntax for a p4 view is documented in 'p4 help views'. 'Git p4'
+The full syntax for a p4 view is documented in 'p4 help views'. 'git p4'
knows only a subset of the view syntax. It understands multi-line
mappings, overlays with '+', exclusions with '-' and double-quotes
around whitespace. Of the possible wildcards, 'git p4' only handles
-'...', and only when it is at the end of the path. 'Git p4' will complain
+'...', and only when it is at the end of the path. 'git p4' will complain
if it encounters an unhandled wildcard.
Bugs in the implementation of overlap mappings exist. If multiple depot
@@ -354,7 +354,7 @@ variable P4CLIENT, a file referenced by P4CONFIG, or the local host name.
BRANCH DETECTION
----------------
-P4 does not have the same concept of a branch as git. Instead,
+P4 does not have the same concept of a branch as Git. Instead,
p4 organizes its content as a directory tree, where by convention
different logical branches are in different locations in the tree.
The 'p4 branch' command is used to maintain mappings between
@@ -364,7 +364,7 @@ can use these mappings to determine branch relationships.
If you have a repository where all the branches of interest exist as
subdirectories of a single depot path, you can use '--detect-branches'
when cloning or syncing to have 'git p4' automatically find
-subdirectories in p4, and to generate these as branches in git.
+subdirectories in p4, and to generate these as branches in Git.
For example, if the P4 repository structure is:
----
@@ -386,7 +386,7 @@ called 'master', and one for //depot/branch1 called 'depot/branch1'.
However, it is not necessary to create branches in p4 to be able to use
them like branches. Because it is difficult to infer branch
-relationships automatically, a git configuration setting
+relationships automatically, a Git configuration setting
'git-p4.branchList' can be used to explicitly identify branch
relationships. It is a list of "source:destination" pairs, like a
simple p4 branch specification, where the "source" and "destination" are
@@ -402,7 +402,7 @@ git p4 clone --detect-branches //depot@all
PERFORMANCE
-----------
The fast-import mechanism used by 'git p4' creates one pack file for
-each invocation of 'git p4 sync'. Normally, git garbage compression
+each invocation of 'git p4 sync'. Normally, Git garbage compression
(linkgit:git-gc[1]) automatically compresses these to fewer pack files,
but explicit invocation of 'git repack -adf' may improve performance.
@@ -440,9 +440,9 @@ git-p4.client::
Clone and sync variables
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
git-p4.syncFromOrigin::
- Because importing commits from other git repositories is much faster
+ Because importing commits from other Git repositories is much faster
than importing them from p4, a mechanism exists to find p4 changes
- first in git remotes. If branches exist under 'refs/remote/origin/p4',
+ first in Git remotes. If branches exist under 'refs/remote/origin/p4',
those will be fetched and used when syncing from p4. This
variable can be set to 'false' to disable this behavior.
@@ -494,7 +494,7 @@ git-p4.detectCopiesHarder::
Detect copies harder. See linkgit:git-diff[1]. A boolean.
git-p4.preserveUser::
- On submit, re-author changes to reflect the git author,
+ On submit, re-author changes to reflect the Git author,
regardless of who invokes 'git p4 submit'.
git-p4.allowMissingP4Users::
@@ -531,7 +531,7 @@ git-p4.attemptRCSCleanup::
present.
git-p4.exportLabels::
- Export git tags to p4 labels, as per --export-labels.
+ Export Git tags to p4 labels, as per --export-labels.
git-p4.labelExportRegexp::
Only p4 labels matching this regular expression will be exported. The
@@ -543,11 +543,11 @@ git-p4.conflict::
IMPLEMENTATION DETAILS
----------------------
-* Changesets from p4 are imported using git fast-import.
+* Changesets from p4 are imported using Git fast-import.
* Cloning or syncing does not require a p4 client; file contents are
collected using 'p4 print'.
* Submitting requires a p4 client, which is not in the same location
- as the git repository. Patches are applied, one at a time, to
+ as the Git repository. Patches are applied, one at a time, to
this p4 client and submitted from there.
* Each commit imported by 'git p4' has a line at the end of the log
message indicating the p4 depot location and change number. This
diff --git a/Documentation/git-pack-objects.txt b/Documentation/git-pack-objects.txt
index 20c8551..69c9313 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-pack-objects.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-pack-objects.txt
@@ -35,7 +35,7 @@ A pack index file (.idx) is generated for fast, random access to the
objects in the pack. Placing both the index file (.idx) and the packed
archive (.pack) in the pack/ subdirectory of $GIT_OBJECT_DIRECTORY (or
any of the directories on $GIT_ALTERNATE_OBJECT_DIRECTORIES)
-enables git to read from the pack archive.
+enables Git to read from the pack archive.
The 'git unpack-objects' command can read the packed archive and
expand the objects contained in the pack into "one-file
@@ -80,7 +80,7 @@ base-name::
--include-tag::
Include unasked-for annotated tags if the object they
reference was included in the resulting packfile. This
- can be useful to send new tags to native git clients.
+ can be useful to send new tags to native Git clients.
--window=<n>::
--depth=<n>::
@@ -185,14 +185,14 @@ base-name::
option only makes sense in conjunction with --stdout.
+
Note: A thin pack violates the packed archive format by omitting
-required objects and is thus unusable by git without making it
+required objects and is thus unusable by Git without making it
self-contained. Use `git index-pack --fix-thin`
(see linkgit:git-index-pack[1]) to restore the self-contained property.
--delta-base-offset::
A packed archive can express the base object of a delta as
either a 20-byte object name or as an offset in the
- stream, but ancient versions of git don't understand the
+ stream, but ancient versions of Git don't understand the
latter. By default, 'git pack-objects' only uses the
former format for better compatibility. This option
allows the command to use the latter format for
@@ -202,7 +202,7 @@ self-contained. Use `git index-pack --fix-thin`
+
Note: Porcelain commands such as `git gc` (see linkgit:git-gc[1]),
`git repack` (see linkgit:git-repack[1]) pass this option by default
-in modern git when they put objects in your repository into pack files.
+in modern Git when they put objects in your repository into pack files.
So does `git bundle` (see linkgit:git-bundle[1]) when it creates a bundle.
--threads=<n>::
@@ -212,7 +212,7 @@ So does `git bundle` (see linkgit:git-bundle[1]) when it creates a bundle.
This is meant to reduce packing time on multiprocessor machines.
The required amount of memory for the delta search window is
however multiplied by the number of threads.
- Specifying 0 will cause git to auto-detect the number of CPU's
+ Specifying 0 will cause Git to auto-detect the number of CPU's
and set the number of threads accordingly.
--index-version=<version>[,<offset>]::
diff --git a/Documentation/git-pull.txt b/Documentation/git-pull.txt
index 67fa5ee..c975743 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-pull.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-pull.txt
@@ -59,8 +59,8 @@ and a log message from the user describing the changes.
See linkgit:git-merge[1] for details, including how conflicts
are presented and handled.
-In git 1.7.0 or later, to cancel a conflicting merge, use
-`git reset --merge`. *Warning*: In older versions of git, running 'git pull'
+In Git 1.7.0 or later, to cancel a conflicting merge, use
+`git reset --merge`. *Warning*: In older versions of Git, running 'git pull'
with uncommitted changes is discouraged: while possible, it leaves you
in a state that may be hard to back out of in the case of a conflict.
@@ -89,7 +89,7 @@ must be given before the options meant for 'git fetch'.
This option controls if new commits of all populated submodules should
be fetched too (see linkgit:git-config[1] and linkgit:gitmodules[5]).
That might be necessary to get the data needed for merging submodule
- commits, a feature git learned in 1.7.3. Notice that the result of a
+ commits, a feature Git learned in 1.7.3. Notice that the result of a
merge will not be checked out in the submodule, "git submodule update"
has to be called afterwards to bring the work tree up to date with the
merge result.
@@ -228,7 +228,7 @@ Using --recurse-submodules can only fetch new commits in already checked
out submodules right now. When e.g. upstream added a new submodule in the
just fetched commits of the superproject the submodule itself can not be
fetched, making it impossible to check out that submodule later without
-having to do a fetch again. This is expected to be fixed in a future git
+having to do a fetch again. This is expected to be fixed in a future Git
version.
SEE ALSO
diff --git a/Documentation/git-push.txt b/Documentation/git-push.txt
index c964b79..1398025 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-push.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-push.txt
@@ -53,7 +53,7 @@ updated.
The object referenced by <src> is used to update the <dst> reference
on the remote side. By default this is only allowed if <dst> is not
a tag (annotated or lightweight), and then only if it can fast-forward
-<dst>. By having the optional leading `+`, you can tell git to update
+<dst>. By having the optional leading `+`, you can tell Git to update
the <dst> ref even if it is not allowed by default (e.g., it is not a
fast-forward.) This does *not* attempt to merge <src> into <dst>. See
EXAMPLES below for details.
@@ -64,7 +64,7 @@ Pushing an empty <src> allows you to delete the <dst> ref from
the remote repository.
+
The special refspec `:` (or `+:` to allow non-fast-forward updates)
-directs git to push "matching" branches: for every branch that exists on
+directs Git to push "matching" branches: for every branch that exists on
the local side, the remote side is updated if a branch of the same name
already exists on the remote side. This is the default operation mode
if no explicit refspec is found (that is neither on the command line
@@ -177,7 +177,7 @@ useful if you write an alias or script around 'git push'.
--recurse-submodules=check|on-demand::
Make sure all submodule commits used by the revisions to be
pushed are available on a remote-tracking branch. If 'check' is
- used git will verify that all submodule commits that changed in
+ used Git will verify that all submodule commits that changed in
the revisions to be pushed are available on at least one remote
of the submodule. If any commits are missing the push will be
aborted and exit with non-zero status. If 'on-demand' is used
@@ -192,7 +192,7 @@ OUTPUT
------
The output of "git push" depends on the transport method used; this
-section describes the output when pushing over the git protocol (either
+section describes the output when pushing over the Git protocol (either
locally or via ssh).
The status of the push is output in tabular form, with each line
diff --git a/Documentation/git-quiltimport.txt b/Documentation/git-quiltimport.txt
index 7f112f3..a356196 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-quiltimport.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-quiltimport.txt
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-Applies a quilt patchset onto the current git branch, preserving
+Applies a quilt patchset onto the current Git branch, preserving
the patch boundaries, patch order, and patch descriptions present
in the quilt patchset.
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ the patch description is displayed and the user is asked to
interactively enter the author of the patch.
If a subject is not found in the patch description the patch name is
-preserved as the 1 line subject in the git description.
+preserved as the 1 line subject in the Git description.
OPTIONS
-------
diff --git a/Documentation/git-rebase.txt b/Documentation/git-rebase.txt
index da067ec..aca8405 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-rebase.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-rebase.txt
@@ -179,7 +179,7 @@ parameter can be any valid commit-ish.
In case of conflict, 'git rebase' will stop at the first problematic commit
and leave conflict markers in the tree. You can use 'git diff' to locate
the markers (<<<<<<) and make edits to resolve the conflict. For each
-file you edit, you need to tell git that the conflict has been resolved,
+file you edit, you need to tell Git that the conflict has been resolved,
typically this would be done with
diff --git a/Documentation/git-reflog.txt b/Documentation/git-reflog.txt
index 7fe2d22..fb8697e 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-reflog.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-reflog.txt
@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ The reflog will cover all recent actions (HEAD reflog records branch switching
as well). It is an alias for `git log -g --abbrev-commit --pretty=oneline`;
see linkgit:git-log[1].
-The reflog is useful in various git commands, to specify the old value
+The reflog is useful in various Git commands, to specify the old value
of a reference. For example, `HEAD@{2}` means "where HEAD used to be
two moves ago", `master@{one.week.ago}` means "where master used to
point to one week ago", and so on. See linkgit:gitrevisions[7] for
diff --git a/Documentation/git-remote-ext.txt b/Documentation/git-remote-ext.txt
index 8a8e1d7..58b7fac 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-remote-ext.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-remote-ext.txt
@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ git remote add <nick> "ext::<command>[ <arguments>...]"
DESCRIPTION
-----------
This remote helper uses the specified '<command>' to connect
-to a remote git server.
+to a remote Git server.
Data written to stdin of the specified '<command>' is assumed
to be sent to a git:// server, git-upload-pack, git-receive-pack
@@ -33,12 +33,12 @@ The following sequences have a special meaning:
'%s'::
Replaced with name (receive-pack, upload-pack, or
- upload-archive) of the service git wants to invoke.
+ upload-archive) of the service Git wants to invoke.
'%S'::
Replaced with long name (git-receive-pack,
git-upload-pack, or git-upload-archive) of the service
- git wants to invoke.
+ Git wants to invoke.
'%G' (must be the first characters in an argument)::
This argument will not be passed to '<command>'. Instead, it
@@ -75,7 +75,7 @@ GIT_EXT_SERVICE_NOPREFIX::
EXAMPLES:
---------
-This remote helper is transparently used by git when
+This remote helper is transparently used by Git when
you use commands such as "git fetch <URL>", "git clone <URL>",
, "git push <URL>" or "git remote add <nick> <URL>", where <URL>
begins with `ext::`. Examples:
@@ -100,14 +100,14 @@ begins with `ext::`. Examples:
Represents a repository with path /repo accessed using the
helper program "git-server-alias foo". The hostname for the
remote server passed in the protocol stream will be "foo"
- (this allows multiple virtual git servers to share a
+ (this allows multiple virtual Git servers to share a
link-level address).
"ext::git-server-alias foo %G/repo% with% spaces %Vfoo"::
Represents a repository with path '/repo with spaces' accessed
using the helper program "git-server-alias foo". The hostname for
the remote server passed in the protocol stream will be "foo"
- (this allows multiple virtual git servers to share a
+ (this allows multiple virtual Git servers to share a
link-level address).
"ext::git-ssl foo.example /bar"::
@@ -118,7 +118,7 @@ begins with `ext::`. Examples:
Documentation
--------------
-Documentation by Ilari Liusvaara, Jonathan Nieder and the git list
+Documentation by Ilari Liusvaara, Jonathan Nieder and the Git list
<git@vger.kernel.org>
GIT
diff --git a/Documentation/git-remote-fd.txt b/Documentation/git-remote-fd.txt
index f095d57..933c2ad 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-remote-fd.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-remote-fd.txt
@@ -11,14 +11,14 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-This helper uses specified file descriptors to connect to a remote git server.
+This helper uses specified file descriptors to connect to a remote Git server.
This is not meant for end users but for programs and scripts calling git
fetch, push or archive.
If only <infd> is given, it is assumed to be a bidirectional socket connected
-to remote git server (git-upload-pack, git-receive-pack or
+to remote Git server (git-upload-pack, git-receive-pack or
git-upload-achive). If both <infd> and <outfd> are given, they are assumed
-to be pipes connected to a remote git server (<infd> being the inbound pipe
+to be pipes connected to a remote Git server (<infd> being the inbound pipe
and <outfd> being the outbound pipe.
It is assumed that any handshaking procedures have already been completed
@@ -52,7 +52,7 @@ EXAMPLES
Documentation
--------------
-Documentation by Ilari Liusvaara and the git list <git@vger.kernel.org>
+Documentation by Ilari Liusvaara and the Git list <git@vger.kernel.org>
GIT
---
diff --git a/Documentation/git-remote-helpers.txt b/Documentation/git-remote-helpers.txt
index 6d696e0..e36fdcb 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-remote-helpers.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-remote-helpers.txt
@@ -14,17 +14,17 @@ DESCRIPTION
-----------
Remote helper programs are normally not used directly by end users,
-but they are invoked by git when it needs to interact with remote
-repositories git does not support natively. A given helper will
-implement a subset of the capabilities documented here. When git
+but they are invoked by Git when it needs to interact with remote
+repositories Git does not support natively. A given helper will
+implement a subset of the capabilities documented here. When Git
needs to interact with a repository using a remote helper, it spawns
the helper as an independent process, sends commands to the helper's
standard input, and expects results from the helper's standard
output. Because a remote helper runs as an independent process from
-git, there is no need to re-link git to add a new helper, nor any
-need to link the helper with the implementation of git.
+Git, there is no need to re-link Git to add a new helper, nor any
+need to link the helper with the implementation of Git.
-Every helper must support the "capabilities" command, which git
+Every helper must support the "capabilities" command, which Git
uses to determine what other commands the helper will accept. Those
other commands can be used to discover and update remote refs,
transport objects between the object database and the remote repository,
@@ -39,15 +39,15 @@ INVOCATION
----------
Remote helper programs are invoked with one or (optionally) two
-arguments. The first argument specifies a remote repository as in git;
+arguments. The first argument specifies a remote repository as in Git;
it is either the name of a configured remote or a URL. The second
argument specifies a URL; it is usually of the form
'<transport>://<address>', but any arbitrary string is possible.
The 'GIT_DIR' environment variable is set up for the remote helper
and can be used to determine where to store additional data or from
-which directory to invoke auxiliary git commands.
+which directory to invoke auxiliary Git commands.
-When git encounters a URL of the form '<transport>://<address>', where
+When Git encounters a URL of the form '<transport>://<address>', where
'<transport>' is a protocol that it cannot handle natively, it
automatically invokes 'git remote-<transport>' with the full URL as
the second argument. If such a URL is encountered directly on the
@@ -55,14 +55,14 @@ command line, the first argument is the same as the second, and if it
is encountered in a configured remote, the first argument is the name
of that remote.
-A URL of the form '<transport>::<address>' explicitly instructs git to
+A URL of the form '<transport>::<address>' explicitly instructs Git to
invoke 'git remote-<transport>' with '<address>' as the second
argument. If such a URL is encountered directly on the command line,
the first argument is '<address>', and if it is encountered in a
configured remote, the first argument is the name of that remote.
Additionally, when a configured remote has 'remote.<name>.vcs' set to
-'<transport>', git explicitly invokes 'git remote-<transport>' with
+'<transport>', Git explicitly invokes 'git remote-<transport>' with
'<name>' as the first argument. If set, the second argument is
'remote.<name>.url'; otherwise, the second argument is omitted.
@@ -85,7 +85,7 @@ Capabilities
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Each remote helper is expected to support only a subset of commands.
-The operations a helper supports are declared to git in the response
+The operations a helper supports are declared to Git in the response
to the `capabilities` command (see COMMANDS, below).
In the following, we list all defined capabilities and for
@@ -114,10 +114,10 @@ Supported commands: 'list for-push', 'push'.
+
Supported commands: 'list for-push', 'export'.
-If a helper advertises 'connect', git will use it if possible and
+If a helper advertises 'connect', Git will use it if possible and
fall back to another capability if the helper requests so when
connecting (see the 'connect' command under COMMANDS).
-When choosing between 'push' and 'export', git prefers 'push'.
+When choosing between 'push' and 'export', Git prefers 'push'.
Other frontends may have some other order of preference.
@@ -126,7 +126,7 @@ Capabilities for Fetching
'connect'::
Can try to connect to 'git upload-pack' (for fetching),
'git receive-pack', etc for communication using the
- git's native packfile protocol. This
+ Git's native packfile protocol. This
requires a bidirectional, full-duplex connection.
+
Supported commands: 'connect'.
@@ -143,10 +143,10 @@ Supported commands: 'list', 'fetch'.
+
Supported commands: 'list', 'import'.
-If a helper advertises 'connect', git will use it if possible and
+If a helper advertises 'connect', Git will use it if possible and
fall back to another capability if the helper requests so when
connecting (see the 'connect' command under COMMANDS).
-When choosing between 'fetch' and 'import', git prefers 'fetch'.
+When choosing between 'fetch' and 'import', Git prefers 'fetch'.
Other frontends may have some other order of preference.
Miscellaneous capabilities
@@ -183,22 +183,22 @@ there is an implied `refspec *:*`.
to retrieve information about blobs and trees that already exist in
fast-import's memory. This requires a channel from fast-import to the
remote-helper.
- If it is advertised in addition to "import", git establishes a pipe from
+ If it is advertised in addition to "import", Git establishes a pipe from
fast-import to the remote-helper's stdin.
- It follows that git and fast-import are both connected to the
- remote-helper's stdin. Because git can send multiple commands to
+ It follows that Git and fast-import are both connected to the
+ remote-helper's stdin. Because Git can send multiple commands to
the remote-helper it is required that helpers that use 'bidi-import'
buffer all 'import' commands of a batch before sending data to fast-import.
This is to prevent mixing commands and fast-import responses on the
helper's stdin.
'export-marks' <file>::
- This modifies the 'export' capability, instructing git to dump the
+ This modifies the 'export' capability, instructing Git to dump the
internal marks table to <file> when complete. For details,
read up on '--export-marks=<file>' in linkgit:git-fast-export[1].
'import-marks' <file>::
- This modifies the 'export' capability, instructing git to load the
+ This modifies the 'export' capability, instructing Git to load the
marks specified in <file> before processing any input. For details,
read up on '--import-marks=<file>' in linkgit:git-fast-export[1].
@@ -213,7 +213,7 @@ Commands are given by the caller on the helper's standard input, one per line.
'capabilities'::
Lists the capabilities of the helper, one per line, ending
with a blank line. Each capability may be preceded with '*',
- which marks them mandatory for git versions using the remote
+ which marks them mandatory for Git versions using the remote
helper to understand. Any unknown mandatory capability is a
fatal error.
+
@@ -376,7 +376,7 @@ OPTIONS
-------
The following options are defined and (under suitable circumstances)
-set by git if the remote helper has the 'option' capability.
+set by Git if the remote helper has the 'option' capability.
'option verbosity' <n>::
Changes the verbosity of messages displayed by the helper.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-replace.txt b/Documentation/git-replace.txt
index 51131d0..0142cd1 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-replace.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-replace.txt
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ replacement object.
Unless `-f` is given, the 'replace' reference must not yet exist.
-Replacement references will be used by default by all git commands
+Replacement references will be used by default by all Git commands
except those doing reachability traversal (prune, pack transfer and
fsck).
diff --git a/Documentation/git-rev-list.txt b/Documentation/git-rev-list.txt
index 38fafca..65ac27e 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-rev-list.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-rev-list.txt
@@ -99,7 +99,7 @@ between the two operands. The following two commands are equivalent:
$ git rev-list A...B
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
-'rev-list' is a very essential git command, since it
+'rev-list' is a very essential Git command, since it
provides the ability to build and traverse commit ancestry graphs. For
this reason, it has a lot of different options that enables it to be
used by commands as different as 'git bisect' and
diff --git a/Documentation/git-rev-parse.txt b/Documentation/git-rev-parse.txt
index 3c63561..c743469 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-rev-parse.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-rev-parse.txt
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-Many git porcelainish commands take mixture of flags
+Many Git porcelainish commands take mixture of flags
(i.e. parameters that begin with a dash '-') and parameters
meant for the underlying 'git rev-list' command they use internally
and flags and parameters for the other commands they use
@@ -147,7 +147,7 @@ shown. If the pattern does not contain a globbing character (`?`,
relative to the current working directory.
+
If `$GIT_DIR` is not defined and the current directory
-is not detected to lie in a git repository or work tree
+is not detected to lie in a Git repository or work tree
print a message to stderr and exit with nonzero status.
--is-inside-git-dir::
diff --git a/Documentation/git-rm.txt b/Documentation/git-rm.txt
index 262436b..92bac27 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-rm.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-rm.txt
@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ OPTIONS
-------
<file>...::
Files to remove. Fileglobs (e.g. `*.c`) can be given to
- remove all matching files. If you want git to expand
+ remove all matching files. If you want Git to expand
file glob characters, you may need to shell-escape them.
A leading directory name
(e.g. `dir` to remove `dir/file1` and `dir/file2`) can be
@@ -74,8 +74,8 @@ DISCUSSION
The <file> list given to the command can be exact pathnames,
file glob patterns, or leading directory names. The command
-removes only the paths that are known to git. Giving the name of
-a file that you have not told git about does not remove that file.
+removes only the paths that are known to Git. Giving the name of
+a file that you have not told Git about does not remove that file.
File globbing matches across directory boundaries. Thus, given
two directories `d` and `d2`, there is a difference between
@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ git diff --name-only --diff-filter=D -z | xargs -0 git rm --cached
Submodules
~~~~~~~~~~
Only submodules using a gitfile (which means they were cloned
-with a git version 1.7.8 or newer) will be removed from the work
+with a Git version 1.7.8 or newer) will be removed from the work
tree, as their repository lives inside the .git directory of the
superproject. If a submodule (or one of those nested inside it)
still uses a .git directory, `git rm` will fail - no matter if forced
@@ -156,7 +156,7 @@ EXAMPLES
`Documentation` directory and any of its subdirectories.
+
Note that the asterisk `*` is quoted from the shell in this
-example; this lets git, and not the shell, expand the pathnames
+example; this lets Git, and not the shell, expand the pathnames
of files and subdirectories under the `Documentation/` directory.
`git rm -f git-*.sh`::
diff --git a/Documentation/git-send-pack.txt b/Documentation/git-send-pack.txt
index bd3eaa6..dc3a568 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-send-pack.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-send-pack.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-send-pack(1)
NAME
----
-git-send-pack - Push objects over git protocol to another repository
+git-send-pack - Push objects over Git protocol to another repository
SYNOPSIS
diff --git a/Documentation/git-sh-setup.txt b/Documentation/git-sh-setup.txt
index 5e5f1c8..6a9f66d 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-sh-setup.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-sh-setup.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-sh-setup(1)
NAME
----
-git-sh-setup - Common git shell script setup code
+git-sh-setup - Common Git shell script setup code
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ Porcelain-ish scripts and/or are writing new ones.
The 'git sh-setup' scriptlet is designed to be sourced (using
`.`) by other shell scripts to set up some variables pointing at
-the normal git directories and a few helper shell functions.
+the normal Git directories and a few helper shell functions.
Before sourcing it, your script should set up a few variables;
`USAGE` (and `LONG_USAGE`, if any) is used to define message
diff --git a/Documentation/git-show-index.txt b/Documentation/git-show-index.txt
index 2dcbbb2..9cbbed9 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-show-index.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-show-index.txt
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-Reads given idx file for packed git archive created with
+Reads given idx file for packed Git archive created with
'git pack-objects' command, and dumps its contents.
The information it outputs is subset of what you can get from
diff --git a/Documentation/git-status.txt b/Documentation/git-status.txt
index 9f1ef9a..0412c40 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-status.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-status.txt
@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ DESCRIPTION
Displays paths that have differences between the index file and the
current HEAD commit, paths that have differences between the working
tree and the index file, and paths in the working tree that are not
-tracked by git (and are not ignored by linkgit:gitignore[5]). The first
+tracked by Git (and are not ignored by linkgit:gitignore[5]). The first
are what you _would_ commit by running `git commit`; the second and
third are what you _could_ commit by running 'git add' before running
`git commit`.
@@ -35,7 +35,7 @@ OPTIONS
--porcelain::
Give the output in an easy-to-parse format for scripts.
This is similar to the short output, but will remain stable
- across git versions and regardless of user configuration. See
+ across Git versions and regardless of user configuration. See
below for details.
--long::
@@ -96,7 +96,7 @@ The default, long format, is designed to be human readable,
verbose and descriptive. Its contents and format are subject to change
at any time.
-The paths mentioned in the output, unlike many other git commands, are
+The paths mentioned in the output, unlike many other Git commands, are
made relative to the current directory if you are working in a
subdirectory (this is on purpose, to help cutting and pasting). See
the status.relativePaths config option below.
@@ -168,7 +168,7 @@ Porcelain Format
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The porcelain format is similar to the short format, but is guaranteed
-not to change in a backwards-incompatible way between git versions or
+not to change in a backwards-incompatible way between Git versions or
based on user configuration. This makes it ideal for parsing by scripts.
The description of the short format above also describes the porcelain
format, with a few exceptions:
diff --git a/Documentation/git-stripspace.txt b/Documentation/git-stripspace.txt
index a80d946..eed921e 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-stripspace.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-stripspace.txt
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-Clean the input in the manner used by 'git' for text such as commit
+Clean the input in the manner used by Git for text such as commit
messages, notes, tags and branch descriptions.
With no arguments, this will:
diff --git a/Documentation/git-submodule.txt b/Documentation/git-submodule.txt
index b1996f1..a0c9df8 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-submodule.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-submodule.txt
@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@ working directory is used instead.
<path> is the relative location for the cloned submodule to
exist in the superproject. If <path> does not exist, then the
submodule is created by cloning from the named URL. If <path> does
-exist and is already a valid git repository, then this is added
+exist and is already a valid Git repository, then this is added
to the changeset without cloning. This second form is provided
to ease creating a new submodule from scratch, and presumes
the user will later push the submodule to the given URL.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-svn.txt b/Documentation/git-svn.txt
index 34d438b..1b8b649 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-svn.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-svn.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-svn(1)
NAME
----
-git-svn - Bidirectional operation between a Subversion repository and git
+git-svn - Bidirectional operation between a Subversion repository and Git
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -12,8 +12,8 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-'git svn' is a simple conduit for changesets between Subversion and git.
-It provides a bidirectional flow of changes between a Subversion and a git
+'git svn' is a simple conduit for changesets between Subversion and Git.
+It provides a bidirectional flow of changes between a Subversion and a Git
repository.
'git svn' can track a standard Subversion repository,
@@ -21,15 +21,15 @@ following the common "trunk/branches/tags" layout, with the --stdlayout option.
It can also follow branches and tags in any layout with the -T/-t/-b options
(see options to 'init' below, and also the 'clone' command).
-Once tracking a Subversion repository (with any of the above methods), the git
+Once tracking a Subversion repository (with any of the above methods), the Git
repository can be updated from Subversion by the 'fetch' command and
-Subversion updated from git by the 'dcommit' command.
+Subversion updated from Git by the 'dcommit' command.
COMMANDS
--------
'init'::
- Initializes an empty git repository with additional
+ Initializes an empty Git repository with additional
metadata directories for 'git svn'. The Subversion URL
may be specified as a command-line argument, or as full
URL arguments to -T/-t/-b. Optionally, the target
@@ -199,9 +199,9 @@ and have no uncommitted changes.
Commit each diff from the current branch directly to the SVN
repository, and then rebase or reset (depending on whether or
not there is a diff between SVN and head). This will create
- a revision in SVN for each commit in git.
+ a revision in SVN for each commit in Git.
+
-When an optional git branch name (or a git commit object name)
+When an optional Git branch name (or a Git commit object name)
is specified as an argument, the subcommand works on the specified
branch, not on the current branch.
+
@@ -316,7 +316,7 @@ New features:
+
--
--show-commit;;
- shows the git commit sha1, as well
+ shows the Git commit sha1, as well
--oneline;;
our version of --pretty=oneline
--
@@ -337,13 +337,13 @@ Any other arguments are passed directly to 'git log'
+
--git-format;;
Produce output in the same format as 'git blame', but with
- SVN revision numbers instead of git commit hashes. In this mode,
+ SVN revision numbers instead of Git commit hashes. In this mode,
changes that haven't been committed to SVN (including local
working-copy edits) are shown as revision 0.
'find-rev'::
When given an SVN revision number of the form 'rN', returns the
- corresponding git commit hash (this can optionally be followed by a
+ corresponding Git commit hash (this can optionally be followed by a
tree-ish to specify which branch should be searched). When given a
tree-ish, returns the corresponding SVN revision number.
+
@@ -378,7 +378,7 @@ Any other arguments are passed directly to 'git log'
the $GIT_DIR/info/exclude file.
'mkdirs'::
- Attempts to recreate empty directories that core git cannot track
+ Attempts to recreate empty directories that core Git cannot track
based on information in $GIT_DIR/svn/<refname>/unhandled.log files.
Empty directories are automatically recreated when using
"git svn clone" and "git svn rebase", so "mkdirs" is intended
@@ -510,9 +510,9 @@ order. Only the leading sha1 is read from each line, so
+
Remove directories from the SVN tree if there are no files left
behind. SVN can version empty directories, and they are not
-removed by default if there are no files left in them. git
+removed by default if there are no files left in them. Git
cannot version empty directories. Enabling this flag will make
-the commit to SVN act like git.
+the commit to SVN act like Git.
+
[verse]
config key: svn.rmdir
@@ -599,7 +599,7 @@ Passed directly to 'git rebase' when using 'dcommit' if a
This can be used with the 'dcommit', 'rebase', 'branch' and
'tag' commands.
+
-For 'dcommit', print out the series of git arguments that would show
+For 'dcommit', print out the series of Git arguments that would show
which diffs would be committed to SVN.
+
For 'rebase', display the local branch associated with the upstream svn
@@ -610,14 +610,14 @@ For 'branch' and 'tag', display the urls that will be used for copying when
creating the branch or tag.
--use-log-author::
- When retrieving svn commits into git (as part of 'fetch', 'rebase', or
+ When retrieving svn commits into Git (as part of 'fetch', 'rebase', or
'dcommit' operations), look for the first `From:` or `Signed-off-by:` line
in the log message and use that as the author string.
--add-author-from::
- When committing to svn from git (as part of 'commit-diff', 'set-tree' or 'dcommit'
+ When committing to svn from Git (as part of 'commit-diff', 'set-tree' or 'dcommit'
operations), if the existing log message doesn't already have a
`From:` or `Signed-off-by:` line, append a `From:` line based on the
- git commit's author string. If you use this, then `--use-log-author`
+ Git commit's author string. If you use this, then `--use-log-author`
will retrieve a valid author string for all commits.
@@ -642,7 +642,7 @@ ADVANCED OPTIONS
one of the repository layout options --trunk, --tags,
--branches, --stdlayout). For each tracked branch, try to find
out where its revision was copied from, and set
- a suitable parent in the first git commit for the branch.
+ a suitable parent in the first Git commit for the branch.
This is especially helpful when we're tracking a directory
that has been moved around within the repository. If this
feature is disabled, the branches created by 'git svn' will all
@@ -674,7 +674,7 @@ option for (hopefully) obvious reasons.
+
This option is NOT recommended as it makes it difficult to track down
old references to SVN revision numbers in existing documentation, bug
-reports and archives. If you plan to eventually migrate from SVN to git
+reports and archives. If you plan to eventually migrate from SVN to Git
and are certain about dropping SVN history, consider
linkgit:git-filter-branch[1] instead. filter-branch also allows
reformatting of metadata for ease-of-reading and rewriting authorship
@@ -714,7 +714,7 @@ svn-remote.<name>.rewriteUUID::
svn-remote.<name>.pushurl::
- Similar to git's 'remote.<name>.pushurl', this key is designed
+ Similar to Git's 'remote.<name>.pushurl', this key is designed
to be used in cases where 'url' points to an SVN repository
via a read-only transport, to provide an alternate read/write
transport. It is assumed that both keys point to the same
@@ -768,15 +768,15 @@ Tracking and contributing to the trunk of a Subversion-managed project
cd trunk
# You should be on master branch, double-check with 'git branch'
git branch
-# Do some work and commit locally to git:
+# Do some work and commit locally to Git:
git commit ...
# Something is committed to SVN, rebase your local changes against the
# latest changes in SVN:
git svn rebase
-# Now commit your changes (that were committed previously using git) to SVN,
+# Now commit your changes (that were committed previously using Git) to SVN,
# as well as automatically updating your working HEAD:
git svn dcommit
-# Append svn:ignore settings to the default git exclude file:
+# Append svn:ignore settings to the default Git exclude file:
git svn show-ignore >> .git/info/exclude
------------------------------------------------------------------------
@@ -816,7 +816,7 @@ have each person clone that repository with 'git clone':
git remote add origin server:/pub/project
git config --replace-all remote.origin.fetch '+refs/remotes/*:refs/remotes/*'
git fetch
-# Prevent fetch/pull from remote git server in the future,
+# Prevent fetch/pull from remote Git server in the future,
# we only want to use git svn for future updates
git config --remove-section remote.origin
# Create a local branch from one of the branches just fetched
@@ -849,13 +849,13 @@ While 'git svn' can track
copy history (including branches and tags) for repositories adopting a
standard layout, it cannot yet represent merge history that happened
inside git back upstream to SVN users. Therefore it is advised that
-users keep history as linear as possible inside git to ease
+users keep history as linear as possible inside Git to ease
compatibility with SVN (see the CAVEATS section below).
HANDLING OF SVN BRANCHES
------------------------
If 'git svn' is configured to fetch branches (and --follow-branches
-is in effect), it sometimes creates multiple git branches for one
+is in effect), it sometimes creates multiple Git branches for one
SVN branch, where the addtional branches have names of the form
'branchname@nnn' (with nnn an SVN revision number). These additional
branches are created if 'git svn' cannot find a parent commit for the
@@ -865,17 +865,17 @@ the other branches.
Normally, the first commit in an SVN branch consists
of a copy operation. 'git svn' will read this commit to get the SVN
revision the branch was created from. It will then try to find the
-git commit that corresponds to this SVN revision, and use that as the
+Git commit that corresponds to this SVN revision, and use that as the
parent of the branch. However, it is possible that there is no suitable
-git commit to serve as parent. This will happen, among other reasons,
+Git commit to serve as parent. This will happen, among other reasons,
if the SVN branch is a copy of a revision that was not fetched by 'git
svn' (e.g. because it is an old revision that was skipped with
'--revision'), or if in SVN a directory was copied that is not tracked
by 'git svn' (such as a branch that is not tracked at all, or a
subdirectory of a tracked branch). In these cases, 'git svn' will still
-create a git branch, but instead of using an existing git commit as the
+create a Git branch, but instead of using an existing Git commit as the
parent of the branch, it will read the SVN history of the directory the
-branch was copied from and create appropriate git commits. This is
+branch was copied from and create appropriate Git commits. This is
indicated by the message "Initializing parent: <branchname>".
Additionally, it will create a special branch named
@@ -885,15 +885,15 @@ created parent commit of the branch. If in SVN the branch was deleted
and later recreated from a different version, there will be multiple
such branches with an '@'.
-Note that this may mean that multiple git commits are created for a
+Note that this may mean that multiple Git commits are created for a
single SVN revision.
An example: in an SVN repository with a standard
trunk/tags/branches layout, a directory trunk/sub is created in r.100.
In r.200, trunk/sub is branched by copying it to branches/. 'git svn
-clone -s' will then create a branch 'sub'. It will also create new git
+clone -s' will then create a branch 'sub'. It will also create new Git
commits for r.100 through r.199 and use these as the history of branch
-'sub'. Thus there will be two git commits for each revision from r.100
+'sub'. Thus there will be two Git commits for each revision from r.100
to r.199 (one containing trunk/, one containing trunk/sub/). Finally,
it will create a branch 'sub@200' pointing to the new parent commit of
branch 'sub' (i.e. the commit for r.200 and trunk/sub/).
@@ -904,13 +904,13 @@ CAVEATS
For the sake of simplicity and interoperating with Subversion,
it is recommended that all 'git svn' users clone, fetch and dcommit
directly from the SVN server, and avoid all 'git clone'/'pull'/'merge'/'push'
-operations between git repositories and branches. The recommended
-method of exchanging code between git branches and users is
+operations between Git repositories and branches. The recommended
+method of exchanging code between Git branches and users is
'git format-patch' and 'git am', or just 'dcommit'ing to the SVN repository.
Running 'git merge' or 'git pull' is NOT recommended on a branch you
plan to 'dcommit' from because Subversion users cannot see any
-merges you've made. Furthermore, if you merge or pull from a git branch
+merges you've made. Furthermore, if you merge or pull from a Git branch
that is a mirror of an SVN branch, 'dcommit' may commit to the wrong
branch.
@@ -929,7 +929,7 @@ any 'git svn' metadata, or config. So repositories created and managed with
using 'git svn' should use 'rsync' for cloning, if cloning is to be done
at all.
-Since 'dcommit' uses rebase internally, any git branches you 'git push' to
+Since 'dcommit' uses rebase internally, any Git branches you 'git push' to
before 'dcommit' on will require forcing an overwrite of the existing ref
on the remote repository. This is generally considered bad practice,
see the linkgit:git-push[1] documentation for details.
@@ -941,7 +941,7 @@ dcommit with SVN is analogous to that.
When cloning an SVN repository, if none of the options for describing
the repository layout is used (--trunk, --tags, --branches,
---stdlayout), 'git svn clone' will create a git repository with
+--stdlayout), 'git svn clone' will create a Git repository with
completely linear history, where branches and tags appear as separate
directories in the working copy. While this is the easiest way to get a
copy of a complete repository, for projects with many branches it will
@@ -957,7 +957,7 @@ branches and tags is required, the options '--trunk' / '--branches' /
When using multiple --branches or --tags, 'git svn' does not automatically
handle name collisions (for example, if two branches from different paths have
the same name, or if a branch and a tag have the same name). In these cases,
-use 'init' to set up your git repository then, before your first 'fetch', edit
+use 'init' to set up your Git repository then, before your first 'fetch', edit
the .git/config file so that the branches and tags are associated with
different name spaces. For example:
@@ -970,12 +970,12 @@ BUGS
We ignore all SVN properties except svn:executable. Any unhandled
properties are logged to $GIT_DIR/svn/<refname>/unhandled.log
-Renamed and copied directories are not detected by git and hence not
+Renamed and copied directories are not detected by Git and hence not
tracked when committing to SVN. I do not plan on adding support for
this as it's quite difficult and time-consuming to get working for all
-the possible corner cases (git doesn't do it, either). Committing
+the possible corner cases (Git doesn't do it, either). Committing
renamed and copied files is fully supported if they're similar enough
-for git to detect them.
+for Git to detect them.
In SVN, it is possible (though discouraged) to commit changes to a tag
(because a tag is just a directory copy, thus technically the same as a
@@ -987,7 +987,7 @@ CONFIGURATION
-------------
'git svn' stores [svn-remote] configuration information in the
-repository .git/config file. It is similar the core git
+repository .git/config file. It is similar the core Git
[remote] sections except 'fetch' keys do not accept glob
arguments; but they are instead handled by the 'branches'
and 'tags' keys. Since some SVN repositories are oddly
diff --git a/Documentation/git-tag.txt b/Documentation/git-tag.txt
index 6470cff..e3032c4 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-tag.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-tag.txt
@@ -242,7 +242,7 @@ $ git pull git://git..../proj.git master
In such a case, you do not want to automatically follow the other
person's tags.
-One important aspect of git is its distributed nature, which
+One important aspect of Git is its distributed nature, which
largely means there is no inherent "upstream" or
"downstream" in the system. On the face of it, the above
example might seem to indicate that the tag namespace is owned
diff --git a/Documentation/git-tools.txt b/Documentation/git-tools.txt
index 2f51b83..338986a 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-tools.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-tools.txt
@@ -1,11 +1,11 @@
-A short git tools survey
+A short Git tools survey
========================
Introduction
------------
-Apart from git contrib/ area there are some others third-party tools
+Apart from Git contrib/ area there are some others third-party tools
you may want to look.
This document presents a brief summary of each tool and the corresponding
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ Alternative/Augmentative Porcelains
- *Cogito* (http://www.kernel.org/pub/software/scm/cogito/)
- Cogito is a version control system layered on top of the git tree history
+ Cogito is a version control system layered on top of the Git tree history
storage system. It aims at seamless user interface and ease of use,
providing generally smoother user experience than the "raw" Core Git
itself and indeed many other version control systems.
@@ -50,7 +50,7 @@ History Viewers
- *gitview* (contrib/)
- gitview is a GTK based repository browser for git
+ gitview is a GTK based repository browser for Git
- *gitweb* (shipped with git-core)
@@ -63,15 +63,15 @@ History Viewers
QGit is a git/StGIT GUI viewer built on Qt/C++. QGit could be used
to browse history and directory tree, view annotated files, commit
changes cherry picking single files or applying patches.
- Currently it is the fastest and most feature rich among the git
+ Currently it is the fastest and most feature rich among the Git
viewers and commit tools.
- *tig* (http://jonas.nitro.dk/tig/)
- tig by Jonas Fonseca is a simple git repository browser
+ tig by Jonas Fonseca is a simple Git repository browser
written using ncurses. Basically, it just acts as a front-end
for git-log and git-show/git-diff. Additionally, you can also
- use it as a pager for git commands.
+ use it as a pager for Git commands.
Foreign SCM interface
@@ -80,20 +80,20 @@ Foreign SCM interface
- *git-svn* (shipped with git-core)
git-svn is a simple conduit for changesets between a single Subversion
- branch and git.
+ branch and Git.
- *quilt2git / git2quilt* (http://home-tj.org/wiki/index.php/Misc)
These utilities convert patch series in a quilt repository and commit
- series in git back and forth.
+ series in Git back and forth.
- *hg-to-git* (contrib/)
- hg-to-git converts a Mercurial repository into a git one, and
+ hg-to-git converts a Mercurial repository into a Git one, and
preserves the full branch history in the process. hg-to-git can
- also be used in an incremental way to keep the git repository
+ also be used in an incremental way to keep the Git repository
in sync with the master Mercurial repository.
@@ -102,14 +102,14 @@ Others
- *(h)gct* (http://www.cyd.liu.se/users/~freku045/gct/)
- Commit Tool or (h)gct is a GUI enabled commit tool for git and
+ Commit Tool or (h)gct is a GUI enabled commit tool for Git and
Mercurial (hg). It allows the user to view diffs, select which files
to committed (or ignored / reverted) write commit messages and
perform the commit itself.
- *git.el* (contrib/)
- This is an Emacs interface for git. The user interface is modeled on
+ This is an Emacs interface for Git. The user interface is modeled on
pcl-cvs. It has been developed on Emacs 21 and will probably need some
tweaking to work on XEmacs.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-update-index.txt b/Documentation/git-update-index.txt
index 9d0b151..77a912d 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-update-index.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-update-index.txt
@@ -82,10 +82,10 @@ OPTIONS
When these flags are specified, the object names recorded
for the paths are not updated. Instead, these options
set and unset the "assume unchanged" bit for the
- paths. When the "assume unchanged" bit is on, git stops
+ paths. When the "assume unchanged" bit is on, Git stops
checking the working tree files for possible
modifications, so you need to manually unset the bit to
- tell git when you change the working tree file. This is
+ tell Git when you change the working tree file. This is
sometimes helpful when working with a big project on a
filesystem that has very slow lstat(2) system call
(e.g. cifs).
@@ -253,18 +253,18 @@ $ git ls-files -s
Using ``assume unchanged'' bit
------------------------------
-Many operations in git depend on your filesystem to have an
+Many operations in Git depend on your filesystem to have an
efficient `lstat(2)` implementation, so that `st_mtime`
information for working tree files can be cheaply checked to see
if the file contents have changed from the version recorded in
the index file. Unfortunately, some filesystems have
inefficient `lstat(2)`. If your filesystem is one of them, you
can set "assume unchanged" bit to paths you have not changed to
-cause git not to do this check. Note that setting this bit on a
-path does not mean git will check the contents of the file to
-see if it has changed -- it makes git to omit any checking and
+cause Git not to do this check. Note that setting this bit on a
+path does not mean Git will check the contents of the file to
+see if it has changed -- it makes Git to omit any checking and
assume it has *not* changed. When you make changes to working
-tree files, you have to explicitly tell git about it by dropping
+tree files, you have to explicitly tell Git about it by dropping
"assume unchanged" bit, either before or after you modify them.
In order to set "assume unchanged" bit, use `--assume-unchanged`
@@ -274,7 +274,7 @@ have the "assume unchanged" bit set, use `git ls-files -v`
The command looks at `core.ignorestat` configuration variable. When
this is true, paths updated with `git update-index paths...` and
-paths updated with other git commands that update both index and
+paths updated with other Git commands that update both index and
working tree (e.g. 'git apply --index', 'git checkout-index -u',
and 'git read-tree -u') are automatically marked as "assume
unchanged". Note that "assume unchanged" bit is *not* set if
diff --git a/Documentation/git-upload-archive.txt b/Documentation/git-upload-archive.txt
index 4d52d38..d09bbb5 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-upload-archive.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-upload-archive.txt
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
Invoked by 'git archive --remote' and sends a generated archive to the
-other end over the git protocol.
+other end over the Git protocol.
This command is usually not invoked directly by the end user. The UI
for the protocol is on the 'git archive' side, and the program pair
diff --git a/Documentation/git-upload-pack.txt b/Documentation/git-upload-pack.txt
index 71f1608..0abc806 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-upload-pack.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-upload-pack.txt
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@ OPTIONS
-------
--strict::
- Do not try <directory>/.git/ if <directory> is no git directory.
+ Do not try <directory>/.git/ if <directory> is no Git directory.
--timeout=<n>::
Interrupt transfer after <n> seconds of inactivity.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-var.txt b/Documentation/git-var.txt
index 67edf58..44ff954 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-var.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-var.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-var(1)
NAME
----
-git-var - Show a git logical variable
+git-var - Show a Git logical variable
SYNOPSIS
@@ -13,13 +13,13 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-Prints a git logical variable.
+Prints a Git logical variable.
OPTIONS
-------
-l::
Cause the logical variables to be listed. In addition, all the
- variables of the git configuration file .git/config are listed
+ variables of the Git configuration file .git/config are listed
as well. (However, the configuration variables listing functionality
is deprecated in favor of `git config -l`.)
@@ -35,10 +35,10 @@ GIT_AUTHOR_IDENT::
The author of a piece of code.
GIT_COMMITTER_IDENT::
- The person who put a piece of code into git.
+ The person who put a piece of code into Git.
GIT_EDITOR::
- Text editor for use by git commands. The value is meant to be
+ Text editor for use by Git commands. The value is meant to be
interpreted by the shell when it is used. Examples: `~/bin/vi`,
`$SOME_ENVIRONMENT_VARIABLE`, `"C:\Program Files\Vim\gvim.exe"
--nofork`. The order of preference is the `$GIT_EDITOR`
@@ -50,7 +50,7 @@ ifdef::git-default-editor[]
endif::git-default-editor[]
GIT_PAGER::
- Text viewer for use by git commands (e.g., 'less'). The value
+ Text viewer for use by Git commands (e.g., 'less'). The value
is meant to be interpreted by the shell. The order of preference
is the `$GIT_PAGER` environment variable, then `core.pager`
configuration, then `$PAGER`, and then the default chosen at
diff --git a/Documentation/git-verify-pack.txt b/Documentation/git-verify-pack.txt
index cd23076..0eb9ffb 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-verify-pack.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-verify-pack.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-verify-pack(1)
NAME
----
-git-verify-pack - Validate packed git archive files
+git-verify-pack - Validate packed Git archive files
SYNOPSIS
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-Reads given idx file for packed git archive created with the
+Reads given idx file for packed Git archive created with the
'git pack-objects' command and verifies idx file and the
corresponding pack file.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-verify-tag.txt b/Documentation/git-verify-tag.txt
index 5ff76e8..e996135 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-verify-tag.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-verify-tag.txt
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ OPTIONS
Print the contents of the tag object before validating it.
<tag>...::
- SHA1 identifiers of git tag objects.
+ SHA1 identifiers of Git tag objects.
GIT
---
diff --git a/Documentation/git-web--browse.txt b/Documentation/git-web--browse.txt
index c2bc87b..ba79cb4 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-web--browse.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-web--browse.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-web{litdd}browse(1)
NAME
----
-git-web--browse - git helper script to launch a web browser
+git-web--browse - Git helper script to launch a web browser
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -50,7 +50,7 @@ OPTIONS
-c <conf.var>::
--config=<conf.var>::
- CONF.VAR is looked up in the git config files. If it's set,
+ CONF.VAR is looked up in the Git config files. If it's set,
then its value specifies the browser that should be used.
CONFIGURATION VARIABLES
diff --git a/Documentation/git-whatchanged.txt b/Documentation/git-whatchanged.txt
index 6c8f510..c600b61 100644
--- a/Documentation/git-whatchanged.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git-whatchanged.txt
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ This manual page describes only the most frequently used options.
OPTIONS
-------
-p::
- Show textual diffs, instead of the git internal diff
+ Show textual diffs, instead of the Git internal diff
output format that is useful only to tell the changed
paths and their nature of changes.
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ OPTIONS
exclusive, top inclusive).
-r::
- Show git internal diff output, but for the whole tree,
+ Show Git internal diff output, but for the whole tree,
not just the top level.
-m::
diff --git a/Documentation/git.txt b/Documentation/git.txt
index 1aac71e..c431ba2 100644
--- a/Documentation/git.txt
+++ b/Documentation/git.txt
@@ -27,11 +27,11 @@ commands. The link:user-manual.html[Git User's Manual] has a more
in-depth introduction.
After you mastered the basic concepts, you can come back to this
-page to learn what commands git offers. You can learn more about
-individual git commands with "git help command". linkgit:gitcli[7]
+page to learn what commands Git offers. You can learn more about
+individual Git commands with "git help command". linkgit:gitcli[7]
manual page gives you an overview of the command line command syntax.
-Formatted and hyperlinked version of the latest git documentation
+Formatted and hyperlinked version of the latest Git documentation
can be viewed at `http://git-htmldocs.googlecode.com/git/git.html`.
ifdef::stalenotes[]
@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ ifdef::stalenotes[]
============
You are reading the documentation for the latest (possibly
-unreleased) version of git, that is available from 'master'
+unreleased) version of Git, that is available from 'master'
branch of the `git.git` repository.
Documentation for older releases are available here:
@@ -355,12 +355,12 @@ endif::stalenotes[]
OPTIONS
-------
--version::
- Prints the git suite version that the 'git' program came from.
+ Prints the Git suite version that the 'git' program came from.
--help::
Prints the synopsis and a list of the most commonly used
commands. If the option '--all' or '-a' is given then all
- available commands are printed. If a git command is named this
+ available commands are printed. If a Git command is named this
option will bring up the manual page for that command.
+
Other options are available to control how the manual page is
@@ -375,22 +375,22 @@ help ...`.
'git config' (subkeys separated by dots).
--exec-path[=<path>]::
- Path to wherever your core git programs are installed.
+ Path to wherever your core Git programs are installed.
This can also be controlled by setting the GIT_EXEC_PATH
environment variable. If no path is given, 'git' will print
the current setting and then exit.
--html-path::
- Print the path, without trailing slash, where git's HTML
+ Print the path, without trailing slash, where Git's HTML
documentation is installed and exit.
--man-path::
Print the manpath (see `man(1)`) for the man pages for
- this version of git and exit.
+ this version of Git and exit.
--info-path::
Print the path where the Info files documenting this
- version of git are installed and exit.
+ version of Git are installed and exit.
-p::
--paginate::
@@ -400,7 +400,7 @@ help ...`.
below).
--no-pager::
- Do not pipe git output into a pager.
+ Do not pipe Git output into a pager.
--git-dir=<path>::
Set the path to the repository. This can also be controlled by
@@ -416,7 +416,7 @@ help ...`.
more detailed discussion).
--namespace=<path>::
- Set the git namespace. See linkgit:gitnamespaces[7] for more
+ Set the Git namespace. See linkgit:gitnamespaces[7] for more
details. Equivalent to setting the `GIT_NAMESPACE` environment
variable.
@@ -426,7 +426,7 @@ help ...`.
directory.
--no-replace-objects::
- Do not use replacement refs to replace git objects. See
+ Do not use replacement refs to replace Git objects. See
linkgit:git-replace[1] for more information.
--literal-pathspecs::
@@ -438,7 +438,7 @@ help ...`.
GIT COMMANDS
------------
-We divide git into high level ("porcelain") commands and low level
+We divide Git into high level ("porcelain") commands and low level
("plumbing") commands.
High-level commands (porcelain)
@@ -475,7 +475,7 @@ include::cmds-foreignscminterface.txt[]
Low-level commands (plumbing)
-----------------------------
-Although git includes its
+Although Git includes its
own porcelain layer, its low-level commands are sufficient to support
development of alternative porcelains. Developers of such porcelains
might start by reading about linkgit:git-update-index[1] and
@@ -596,7 +596,7 @@ Identifier Terminology
Symbolic Identifiers
--------------------
-Any git command accepting any <object> can also use the following
+Any Git command accepting any <object> can also use the following
symbolic notation:
HEAD::
@@ -632,13 +632,13 @@ Please see linkgit:gitglossary[7].
Environment Variables
---------------------
-Various git commands use the following environment variables:
+Various Git commands use the following environment variables:
-The git Repository
+The Git Repository
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-These environment variables apply to 'all' core git commands. Nb: it
+These environment variables apply to 'all' core Git commands. Nb: it
is worth noting that they may be used/overridden by SCMS sitting above
-git so take care if using Cogito etc.
+Git so take care if using Cogito etc.
'GIT_INDEX_FILE'::
This environment allows the specification of an alternate
@@ -652,10 +652,10 @@ git so take care if using Cogito etc.
directory is used.
'GIT_ALTERNATE_OBJECT_DIRECTORIES'::
- Due to the immutable nature of git objects, old objects can be
+ Due to the immutable nature of Git objects, old objects can be
archived into shared, read-only directories. This variable
specifies a ":" separated (on Windows ";" separated) list
- of git object directories which can be used to search for git
+ of Git object directories which can be used to search for Git
objects. New objects will not be written to these directories.
'GIT_DIR'::
@@ -672,12 +672,12 @@ git so take care if using Cogito etc.
option and the core.worktree configuration variable.
'GIT_NAMESPACE'::
- Set the git namespace; see linkgit:gitnamespaces[7] for details.
+ Set the Git namespace; see linkgit:gitnamespaces[7] for details.
The '--namespace' command-line option also sets this value.
'GIT_CEILING_DIRECTORIES'::
This should be a colon-separated list of absolute paths.
- If set, it is a list of directories that git should not chdir
+ If set, it is a list of directories that Git should not chdir
up into while looking for a repository directory.
It will not exclude the current working directory or
a GIT_DIR set on the command line or in the environment.
@@ -685,15 +685,15 @@ git so take care if using Cogito etc.
'GIT_DISCOVERY_ACROSS_FILESYSTEM'::
When run in a directory that does not have ".git" repository
- directory, git tries to find such a directory in the parent
+ directory, Git tries to find such a directory in the parent
directories to find the top of the working tree, but by default it
does not cross filesystem boundaries. This environment variable
- can be set to true to tell git not to stop at filesystem
+ can be set to true to tell Git not to stop at filesystem
boundaries. Like 'GIT_CEILING_DIRECTORIES', this will not affect
an explicit repository directory set via 'GIT_DIR' or on the
command line.
-git Commits
+Git Commits
~~~~~~~~~~~
'GIT_AUTHOR_NAME'::
'GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL'::
@@ -704,13 +704,13 @@ git Commits
'EMAIL'::
see linkgit:git-commit-tree[1]
-git Diffs
+Git Diffs
~~~~~~~~~
'GIT_DIFF_OPTS'::
Only valid setting is "--unified=??" or "-u??" to set the
number of context lines shown when a unified diff is created.
This takes precedence over any "-U" or "--unified" option
- value passed on the git diff command line.
+ value passed on the Git diff command line.
'GIT_EXTERNAL_DIFF'::
When the environment variable 'GIT_EXTERNAL_DIFF' is set, the
@@ -745,13 +745,13 @@ other
'GIT_PAGER'::
This environment variable overrides `$PAGER`. If it is set
- to an empty string or to the value "cat", git will not launch
+ to an empty string or to the value "cat", Git will not launch
a pager. See also the `core.pager` option in
linkgit:git-config[1].
'GIT_EDITOR'::
This environment variable overrides `$EDITOR` and `$VISUAL`.
- It is used by several git commands when, on interactive mode,
+ It is used by several Git commands when, on interactive mode,
an editor is to be launched. See also linkgit:git-var[1]
and the `core.editor` option in linkgit:git-config[1].
@@ -772,7 +772,7 @@ personal `.ssh/config` file. Please consult your ssh documentation
for further details.
'GIT_ASKPASS'::
- If this environment variable is set, then git commands which need to
+ If this environment variable is set, then Git commands which need to
acquire passwords or passphrases (e.g. for HTTP or IMAP authentication)
will call this program with a suitable prompt as command line argument
and read the password from its STDOUT. See also the 'core.askpass'
@@ -793,30 +793,30 @@ for further details.
after each commit-oriented record have been flushed. If this
variable is set to "0", the output of these commands will be done
using completely buffered I/O. If this environment variable is
- not set, git will choose buffered or record-oriented flushing
+ not set, Git will choose buffered or record-oriented flushing
based on whether stdout appears to be redirected to a file or not.
'GIT_TRACE'::
If this variable is set to "1", "2" or "true" (comparison
- is case insensitive), git will print `trace:` messages on
+ is case insensitive), Git will print `trace:` messages on
stderr telling about alias expansion, built-in command
execution and external command execution.
If this variable is set to an integer value greater than 1
- and lower than 10 (strictly) then git will interpret this
+ and lower than 10 (strictly) then Git will interpret this
value as an open file descriptor and will try to write the
trace messages into this file descriptor.
Alternatively, if this variable is set to an absolute path
- (starting with a '/' character), git will interpret this
+ (starting with a '/' character), Git will interpret this
as a file path and will try to write the trace messages
into it.
GIT_LITERAL_PATHSPECS::
- Setting this variable to `1` will cause git to treat all
+ Setting this variable to `1` will cause Git to treat all
pathspecs literally, rather than as glob patterns. For example,
running `GIT_LITERAL_PATHSPECS=1 git log -- '*.c'` will search
for commits that touch the path `*.c`, not any paths that the
glob `*.c` matches. You might want this if you are feeding
- literal paths to git (e.g., paths previously given to you by
+ literal paths to Git (e.g., paths previously given to you by
`git ls-tree`, `--raw` diff output, etc).
@@ -824,10 +824,10 @@ Discussion[[Discussion]]
------------------------
More detail on the following is available from the
-link:user-manual.html#git-concepts[git concepts chapter of the
+link:user-manual.html#git-concepts[Git concepts chapter of the
user-manual] and linkgit:gitcore-tutorial[7].
-A git project normally consists of a working directory with a ".git"
+A Git project normally consists of a working directory with a ".git"
subdirectory at the top level. The .git directory contains, among other
things, a compressed object database representing the complete history
of the project, an "index" file which links that history to the current
@@ -877,12 +877,12 @@ FURTHER DOCUMENTATION
---------------------
See the references in the "description" section to get started
-using git. The following is probably more detail than necessary
+using Git. The following is probably more detail than necessary
for a first-time user.
-The link:user-manual.html#git-concepts[git concepts chapter of the
+The link:user-manual.html#git-concepts[Git concepts chapter of the
user-manual] and linkgit:gitcore-tutorial[7] both provide
-introductions to the underlying git architecture.
+introductions to the underlying Git architecture.
See linkgit:gitworkflows[7] for an overview of recommended workflows.
@@ -899,7 +899,7 @@ read linkgit:gitcvs-migration[7].
Authors
-------
Git was started by Linus Torvalds, and is currently maintained by Junio
-C Hamano. Numerous contributions have come from the git mailing list
+C Hamano. Numerous contributions have come from the Git mailing list
<git@vger.kernel.org>. http://www.ohloh.net/p/git/contributors/summary
gives you a more complete list of contributors.
diff --git a/Documentation/gitattributes.txt b/Documentation/gitattributes.txt
index 2698f63..b322a26 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitattributes.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitattributes.txt
@@ -58,7 +58,7 @@ attribute. The rules how the pattern matches paths are the
same as in `.gitignore` files; see linkgit:gitignore[5].
Unlike `.gitignore`, negative patterns are forbidden.
-When deciding what attributes are assigned to a path, git
+When deciding what attributes are assigned to a path, Git
consults `$GIT_DIR/info/attributes` file (which has the highest
precedence), `.gitattributes` file in the same directory as the
path in question, and its parent directories up to the toplevel of the
@@ -94,7 +94,7 @@ the name of the attribute prefixed with an exclamation point `!`.
EFFECTS
-------
-Certain operations by git can be influenced by assigning
+Certain operations by Git can be influenced by assigning
particular attributes to a path. Currently, the following
operations are attributes-aware.
@@ -104,7 +104,7 @@ Checking-out and checking-in
These attributes affect how the contents stored in the
repository are copied to the working tree files when commands
such as 'git checkout' and 'git merge' run. They also affect how
-git stores the contents you prepare in the working tree in the
+Git stores the contents you prepare in the working tree in the
repository upon 'git add' and 'git commit'.
`text`
@@ -124,22 +124,22 @@ Set::
Unset::
- Unsetting the `text` attribute on a path tells git not to
+ Unsetting the `text` attribute on a path tells Git not to
attempt any end-of-line conversion upon checkin or checkout.
Set to string value "auto"::
When `text` is set to "auto", the path is marked for automatic
- end-of-line normalization. If git decides that the content is
+ end-of-line normalization. If Git decides that the content is
text, its line endings are normalized to LF on checkin.
Unspecified::
- If the `text` attribute is unspecified, git uses the
+ If the `text` attribute is unspecified, Git uses the
`core.autocrlf` configuration variable to determine if the
file should be converted.
-Any other value causes git to act as if `text` has been left
+Any other value causes Git to act as if `text` has been left
unspecified.
`eol`
@@ -151,13 +151,13 @@ content checks, effectively setting the `text` attribute.
Set to string value "crlf"::
- This setting forces git to normalize line endings for this
+ This setting forces Git to normalize line endings for this
file on checkin and convert them to CRLF when the file is
checked out.
Set to string value "lf"::
- This setting forces git to normalize line endings to LF on
+ This setting forces Git to normalize line endings to LF on
checkin and prevents conversion to CRLF when the file is
checked out.
@@ -176,11 +176,11 @@ crlf=input eol=lf
End-of-line conversion
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
-While git normally leaves file contents alone, it can be configured to
+While Git normally leaves file contents alone, it can be configured to
normalize line endings to LF in the repository and, optionally, to
convert them to CRLF when files are checked out.
-Here is an example that will make git normalize .txt, .vcproj and .sh
+Here is an example that will make Git normalize .txt, .vcproj and .sh
files, ensure that .vcproj files have CRLF and .sh files have LF in
the working directory, and prevent .jpg files from being normalized
regardless of their content.
@@ -194,7 +194,7 @@ regardless of their content.
Other source code management systems normalize all text files in their
repositories, and there are two ways to enable similar automatic
-normalization in git.
+normalization in Git.
If you simply want to have CRLF line endings in your working directory
regardless of the repository you are working with, you can set the
@@ -219,9 +219,9 @@ attribute to "auto" for _all_ files.
* text=auto
------------------------
-This ensures that all files that git considers to be text will have
+This ensures that all files that Git considers to be text will have
normalized (LF) line endings in the repository. The `core.eol`
-configuration variable controls which line endings git will use for
+configuration variable controls which line endings Git will use for
normalized files in your working directory; the default is to use the
native line ending for your platform, or CRLF if `core.autocrlf` is
set.
@@ -234,7 +234,7 @@ directory:
-------------------------------------------------
$ echo "* text=auto" >>.gitattributes
-$ rm .git/index # Remove the index to force git to
+$ rm .git/index # Remove the index to force Git to
$ git reset # re-scan the working directory
$ git status # Show files that will be normalized
$ git add -u
@@ -249,17 +249,17 @@ unset their `text` attribute before running 'git add -u'.
manual.pdf -text
------------------------
-Conversely, text files that git does not detect can have normalization
+Conversely, text files that Git does not detect can have normalization
enabled manually.
------------------------
weirdchars.txt text
------------------------
-If `core.safecrlf` is set to "true" or "warn", git verifies if
+If `core.safecrlf` is set to "true" or "warn", Git verifies if
the conversion is reversible for the current setting of
-`core.autocrlf`. For "true", git rejects irreversible
-conversions; for "warn", git only prints a warning but accepts
+`core.autocrlf`. For "true", Git rejects irreversible
+conversions; for "warn", Git only prints a warning but accepts
an irreversible conversion. The safety triggers to prevent such
a conversion done to the files in the work tree, but there are a
few exceptions. Even though...
@@ -280,7 +280,7 @@ few exceptions. Even though...
`ident`
^^^^^^^
-When the attribute `ident` is set for a path, git replaces
+When the attribute `ident` is set for a path, Git replaces
`$Id$` in the blob object with `$Id:`, followed by the
40-character hexadecimal blob object name, followed by a dollar
sign `$` upon checkout. Any byte sequence that begins with
@@ -311,7 +311,7 @@ the appropriate filter program, the project should still be usable.
Another use of the content filtering is to store the content that cannot
be directly used in the repository (e.g. a UUID that refers to the true
-content stored outside git, or an encrypted content) and turn it into a
+content stored outside Git, or an encrypted content) and turn it into a
usable form upon checkout (e.g. download the external content, or decrypt
the encrypted content).
@@ -397,7 +397,7 @@ clean/smudge filter or text/eol/ident attributes, merging anything
where the attribute is not in place would normally cause merge
conflicts.
-To prevent these unnecessary merge conflicts, git can be told to run a
+To prevent these unnecessary merge conflicts, Git can be told to run a
virtual check-out and check-in of all three stages of a file when
resolving a three-way merge by setting the `merge.renormalize`
configuration variable. This prevents changes caused by check-in
@@ -417,11 +417,11 @@ Generating diff text
`diff`
^^^^^^
-The attribute `diff` affects how 'git' generates diffs for particular
-files. It can tell git whether to generate a textual patch for the path
+The attribute `diff` affects how Git generates diffs for particular
+files. It can tell Git whether to generate a textual patch for the path
or to treat the path as a binary file. It can also affect what line is
-shown on the hunk header `@@ -k,l +n,m @@` line, tell git to use an
-external command to generate the diff, or ask git to convert binary
+shown on the hunk header `@@ -k,l +n,m @@` line, tell Git to use an
+external command to generate the diff, or ask Git to convert binary
files to a text format before generating the diff.
Set::
@@ -449,7 +449,7 @@ String::
specify one or more options, as described in the following
section. The options for the diff driver "foo" are defined
by the configuration variables in the "diff.foo" section of the
- git config file.
+ Git config file.
Defining an external diff driver
@@ -467,7 +467,7 @@ To define an external diff driver `jcdiff`, add a section to your
command = j-c-diff
----------------------------------------------------------------
-When git needs to show you a diff for the path with `diff`
+When Git needs to show you a diff for the path with `diff`
attribute set to `jcdiff`, it calls the command you specified
with the above configuration, i.e. `j-c-diff`, with 7
parameters, just like `GIT_EXTERNAL_DIFF` program is called.
@@ -606,7 +606,7 @@ should generate it separately and send it as a comment _in
addition to_ the usual binary diff that you might send.
Because text conversion can be slow, especially when doing a
-large number of them with `git log -p`, git provides a mechanism
+large number of them with `git log -p`, Git provides a mechanism
to cache the output and use it in future diffs. To enable
caching, set the "cachetextconv" variable in your diff driver's
config. For example:
@@ -619,7 +619,7 @@ config. For example:
This will cache the result of running "exif" on each blob
indefinitely. If you change the textconv config variable for a
-diff driver, git will automatically invalidate the cache entries
+diff driver, Git will automatically invalidate the cache entries
and re-run the textconv filter. If you want to invalidate the
cache manually (e.g., because your version of "exif" was updated
and now produces better output), you can remove the cache
@@ -640,7 +640,7 @@ output to resemble unified diff. You are free to locate and report
changes in the most appropriate way for your data format.
A textconv, by comparison, is much more limiting. You provide a
-transformation of the data into a line-oriented text format, and git
+transformation of the data into a line-oriented text format, and Git
uses its regular diff tools to generate the output. There are several
advantages to choosing this method:
@@ -650,7 +650,7 @@ advantages to choosing this method:
odt2txt).
2. Git diff features. By performing only the transformation step
- yourself, you can still utilize many of git's diff features,
+ yourself, you can still utilize many of Git's diff features,
including colorization, word-diff, and combined diffs for merges.
3. Caching. Textconv caching can speed up repeated diffs, such as those
@@ -675,7 +675,7 @@ attribute in the `.gitattributes` file:
*.ps -diff
------------------------
-This will cause git to generate `Binary files differ` (or a binary
+This will cause Git to generate `Binary files differ` (or a binary
patch, if binary patches are enabled) instead of a regular diff.
However, one may also want to specify other diff driver attributes. For
@@ -831,7 +831,7 @@ control per path.
Set::
- Notice all types of potential whitespace errors known to git.
+ Notice all types of potential whitespace errors known to Git.
The tab width is taken from the value of the `core.whitespace`
configuration variable.
@@ -863,7 +863,7 @@ archive files.
`export-subst`
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
-If the attribute `export-subst` is set for a file then git will expand
+If the attribute `export-subst` is set for a file then Git will expand
several placeholders when adding this file to an archive. The
expansion depends on the availability of a commit ID, i.e., if
linkgit:git-archive[1] has been given a tree instead of a commit or a
@@ -961,7 +961,7 @@ abc -foo -bar
the attributes given to path `t/abc` are computed as follows:
1. By examining `t/.gitattributes` (which is in the same
- directory as the path in question), git finds that the first
+ directory as the path in question), Git finds that the first
line matches. `merge` attribute is set. It also finds that
the second line matches, and attributes `foo` and `bar`
are unset.
diff --git a/Documentation/gitcli.txt b/Documentation/gitcli.txt
index 3bc1500..dc9e617 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitcli.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitcli.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ gitcli(7)
NAME
----
-gitcli - git command line interface and conventions
+gitcli - Git command line interface and conventions
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ gitcli
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-This manual describes the convention used throughout git CLI.
+This manual describes the convention used throughout Git CLI.
Many commands take revisions (most often "commits", but sometimes
"tree-ish", depending on the context and command) and paths as their
@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@ arguments. Here are the rules:
between the HEAD commit and the work tree as a whole". You can say
`git diff HEAD --` to ask for the latter.
- * Without disambiguating `--`, git makes a reasonable guess, but errors
+ * Without disambiguating `--`, Git makes a reasonable guess, but errors
out and asking you to disambiguate when ambiguous. E.g. if you have a
file called HEAD in your work tree, `git diff HEAD` is ambiguous, and
you have to say either `git diff HEAD --` or `git diff -- HEAD` to
@@ -60,9 +60,9 @@ see `hello.c` in your working tree with the former, but with the latter
you will.
Here are the rules regarding the "flags" that you should follow when you are
-scripting git:
+scripting Git:
- * it's preferred to use the non dashed form of git commands, which means that
+ * it's preferred to use the non dashed form of Git commands, which means that
you should prefer `git foo` to `git-foo`.
* splitting short options to separate words (prefer `git foo -a -b`
@@ -90,7 +90,7 @@ scripting git:
ENHANCED OPTION PARSER
----------------------
-From the git 1.5.4 series and further, many git commands (not all of them at the
+From the Git 1.5.4 series and further, many Git commands (not all of them at the
time of the writing though) come with an enhanced option parser.
Here is a list of the facilities provided by this option parser.
@@ -117,7 +117,7 @@ usage: git describe [options] <committish>*
---------------------------------------------
--help-all::
- Some git commands take options that are only used for plumbing or that
+ Some Git commands take options that are only used for plumbing or that
are deprecated, and such options are hidden from the default usage. This
option gives the full list of options.
diff --git a/Documentation/gitcore-tutorial.txt b/Documentation/gitcore-tutorial.txt
index 6a701dd..59c1c17 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitcore-tutorial.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitcore-tutorial.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ gitcore-tutorial(7)
NAME
----
-gitcore-tutorial - A git core tutorial for developers
+gitcore-tutorial - A Git core tutorial for developers
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -12,17 +12,17 @@ git *
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-This tutorial explains how to use the "core" git commands to set up and
-work with a git repository.
+This tutorial explains how to use the "core" Git commands to set up and
+work with a Git repository.
-If you just need to use git as a revision control system you may prefer
+If you just need to use Git as a revision control system you may prefer
to start with "A Tutorial Introduction to Git" (linkgit:gittutorial[7]) or
link:user-manual.html[the Git User Manual].
However, an understanding of these low-level tools can be helpful if
-you want to understand git's internals.
+you want to understand Git's internals.
-The core git is often called "plumbing", with the prettier user
+The core Git is often called "plumbing", with the prettier user
interfaces on top of it called "porcelain". You may not want to use the
plumbing directly very often, but it can be good to know what the
plumbing does for when the porcelain isn't flushing.
@@ -40,19 +40,19 @@ Deeper technical details are often marked as Notes, which you can
skip on your first reading.
-Creating a git repository
+Creating a Git repository
-------------------------
-Creating a new git repository couldn't be easier: all git repositories start
+Creating a new Git repository couldn't be easier: all Git repositories start
out empty, and the only thing you need to do is find yourself a
subdirectory that you want to use as a working tree - either an empty
one for a totally new project, or an existing working tree that you want
-to import into git.
+to import into Git.
For our first example, we're going to start a totally new repository from
scratch, with no pre-existing files, and we'll call it 'git-tutorial'.
To start up, create a subdirectory for it, change into that
-subdirectory, and initialize the git infrastructure with 'git init':
+subdirectory, and initialize the Git infrastructure with 'git init':
------------------------------------------------
$ mkdir git-tutorial
@@ -60,13 +60,13 @@ $ cd git-tutorial
$ git init
------------------------------------------------
-to which git will reply
+to which Git will reply
----------------
Initialized empty Git repository in .git/
----------------
-which is just git's way of saying that you haven't been doing anything
+which is just Git's way of saying that you haven't been doing anything
strange, and that it will have created a local `.git` directory setup for
your new project. You will now have a `.git` directory, and you can
inspect that with 'ls'. For your new empty project, it should show you
@@ -102,7 +102,7 @@ start out expecting to work on the `master` branch.
However, this is only a convention, and you can name your branches
anything you want, and don't have to ever even 'have' a `master`
-branch. A number of the git tools will assume that `.git/HEAD` is
+branch. A number of the Git tools will assume that `.git/HEAD` is
valid, though.
[NOTE]
@@ -119,18 +119,18 @@ populating your tree.
An advanced user may want to take a look at linkgit:gitrepository-layout[5]
after finishing this tutorial.
-You have now created your first git repository. Of course, since it's
+You have now created your first Git repository. Of course, since it's
empty, that's not very useful, so let's start populating it with data.
-Populating a git repository
+Populating a Git repository
---------------------------
We'll keep this simple and stupid, so we'll start off with populating a
few trivial files just to get a feel for it.
Start off with just creating any random files that you want to maintain
-in your git repository. We'll start off with a few bad examples, just to
+in your Git repository. We'll start off with a few bad examples, just to
get a feel for how this works:
------------------------------------------------
@@ -146,7 +146,7 @@ but to actually check in your hard work, you will have to go through two steps:
- commit that index file as an object.
-The first step is trivial: when you want to tell git about any changes
+The first step is trivial: when you want to tell Git about any changes
to your working tree, you use the 'git update-index' program. That
program normally just takes a list of filenames you want to update, but
to avoid trivial mistakes, it refuses to add new entries to the index
@@ -160,10 +160,10 @@ So to populate the index with the two files you just created, you can do
$ git update-index --add hello example
------------------------------------------------
-and you have now told git to track those two files.
+and you have now told Git to track those two files.
In fact, as you did that, if you now look into your object directory,
-you'll notice that git will have added two new objects to the object
+you'll notice that Git will have added two new objects to the object
database. If you did exactly the steps above, you should now be able to do
@@ -189,7 +189,7 @@ $ git cat-file -t 557db03de997c86a4a028e1ebd3a1ceb225be238
----------------
where the `-t` tells 'git cat-file' to tell you what the "type" of the
-object is. git will tell you that you have a "blob" object (i.e., just a
+object is. Git will tell you that you have a "blob" object (i.e., just a
regular file), and you can see the contents with
----------------
@@ -214,28 +214,28 @@ Anyway, as we mentioned previously, you normally never actually take a
look at the objects themselves, and typing long 40-character hex
names is not something you'd normally want to do. The above digression
was just to show that 'git update-index' did something magical, and
-actually saved away the contents of your files into the git object
+actually saved away the contents of your files into the Git object
database.
Updating the index did something else too: it created a `.git/index`
file. This is the index that describes your current working tree, and
something you should be very aware of. Again, you normally never worry
about the index file itself, but you should be aware of the fact that
-you have not actually really "checked in" your files into git so far,
-you've only *told* git about them.
+you have not actually really "checked in" your files into Git so far,
+you've only *told* Git about them.
-However, since git knows about them, you can now start using some of the
-most basic git commands to manipulate the files or look at their status.
+However, since Git knows about them, you can now start using some of the
+most basic Git commands to manipulate the files or look at their status.
-In particular, let's not even check in the two files into git yet, we'll
+In particular, let's not even check in the two files into Git yet, we'll
start off by adding another line to `hello` first:
------------------------------------------------
$ echo "It's a new day for git" >>hello
------------------------------------------------
-and you can now, since you told git about the previous state of `hello`, ask
-git what has changed in the tree compared to your old index, using the
+and you can now, since you told Git about the previous state of `hello`, ask
+Git what has changed in the tree compared to your old index, using the
'git diff-files' command:
------------
@@ -282,11 +282,11 @@ index 557db03..263414f 100644
------------
-Committing git state
+Committing Git state
--------------------
-Now, we want to go to the next stage in git, which is to take the files
-that git knows about in the index, and commit them as a real tree. We do
+Now, we want to go to the next stage in Git, which is to take the files
+that Git knows about in the index, and commit them as a real tree. We do
that in two phases: creating a 'tree' object, and committing that 'tree'
object as a 'commit' object together with an explanation of what the
tree was all about, along with information of how we came to that state.
@@ -296,7 +296,7 @@ There are no options or other input: `git write-tree` will take the
current index state, and write an object that describes that whole
index. In other words, we're now tying together all the different
filenames with their contents (and their permissions), and we're
-creating the equivalent of a git "directory" object:
+creating the equivalent of a Git "directory" object:
------------------------------------------------
$ git write-tree
@@ -415,9 +415,9 @@ regardless of whether the `--cached` flag is used or not. The `--cached`
flag really only determines whether the file *contents* to be compared
come from the working tree or not.
-This is not hard to understand, as soon as you realize that git simply
+This is not hard to understand, as soon as you realize that Git simply
never knows (or cares) about files that it is not told about
-explicitly. git will never go *looking* for files to compare, it
+explicitly. Git will never go *looking* for files to compare, it
expects you to tell it what the files are, and that's what the index
is there for.
================
@@ -433,7 +433,7 @@ update the index cache:
$ git update-index hello
------------------------------------------------
-(note how we didn't need the `--add` flag this time, since git knew
+(note how we didn't need the `--add` flag this time, since Git knew
about the file already).
Note what happens to the different 'git diff-{asterisk}' versions here.
@@ -464,7 +464,7 @@ this point (you can continue to edit things and update the index), you
can just leave an empty message. Otherwise `git commit` will commit
the change for you.
-You've now made your first real git commit. And if you're interested in
+You've now made your first real Git commit. And if you're interested in
looking at what `git commit` really does, feel free to investigate:
it's a few very simple shell scripts to generate the helpful (?) commit
message headers, and a few one-liners that actually do the
@@ -535,7 +535,7 @@ all, but just show the actual commit message.
In fact, together with the 'git rev-list' program (which generates a
list of revisions), 'git diff-tree' ends up being a veritable fount of
changes. A trivial (but very useful) script called 'git whatchanged' is
-included with git which does exactly this, and shows a log of recent
+included with Git which does exactly this, and shows a log of recent
activities.
To see the whole history of our pitiful little git-tutorial project, you
@@ -563,19 +563,19 @@ the log.showroot configuration variable to false. Having this, you
can still show it for each command just adding the `--root` option,
which is a flag for 'git diff-tree' accepted by both commands.
-With that, you should now be having some inkling of what git does, and
+With that, you should now be having some inkling of what Git does, and
can explore on your own.
[NOTE]
Most likely, you are not directly using the core
-git Plumbing commands, but using Porcelain such as 'git add', `git-rm'
+Git Plumbing commands, but using Porcelain such as 'git add', `git-rm'
and `git-commit'.
Tagging a version
-----------------
-In git, there are two kinds of tags, a "light" one, and an "annotated tag".
+In Git, there are two kinds of tags, a "light" one, and an "annotated tag".
A "light" tag is technically nothing more than a branch, except we put
it in the `.git/refs/tags/` subdirectory instead of calling it a `head`.
@@ -598,7 +598,7 @@ obviously be an empty diff, but if you continue to develop and commit
stuff, you can use your tag as an "anchor-point" to see what has changed
since you tagged it.
-An "annotated tag" is actually a real git object, and contains not only a
+An "annotated tag" is actually a real Git object, and contains not only a
pointer to the state you want to tag, but also a small tag name and
message, along with optionally a PGP signature that says that yes,
you really did
@@ -623,17 +623,17 @@ name for the state at that point.
Copying repositories
--------------------
-git repositories are normally totally self-sufficient and relocatable.
+Git repositories are normally totally self-sufficient and relocatable.
Unlike CVS, for example, there is no separate notion of
-"repository" and "working tree". A git repository normally *is* the
-working tree, with the local git information hidden in the `.git`
+"repository" and "working tree". A Git repository normally *is* the
+working tree, with the local Git information hidden in the `.git`
subdirectory. There is nothing else. What you see is what you got.
[NOTE]
-You can tell git to split the git internal information from
+You can tell Git to split the Git internal information from
the directory that it tracks, but we'll ignore that for now: it's not
how normal projects work, and it's really only meant for special uses.
-So the mental model of "the git information is always tied directly to
+So the mental model of "the Git information is always tied directly to
the working tree that it describes" may not be technically 100%
accurate, but it's a good model for all normal use.
@@ -649,13 +649,13 @@ $ rm -rf git-tutorial
and it will be gone. There's no external repository, and there's no
history outside the project you created.
- - if you want to move or duplicate a git repository, you can do so. There
+ - if you want to move or duplicate a Git repository, you can do so. There
is 'git clone' command, but if all you want to do is just to
create a copy of your repository (with all the full history that
went along with it), you can do so with a regular
`cp -a git-tutorial new-git-tutorial`.
+
-Note that when you've moved or copied a git repository, your git index
+Note that when you've moved or copied a Git repository, your Git index
file (which caches various information, notably some of the "stat"
information for the files involved) will likely need to be refreshed.
So after you do a `cp -a` to create a new copy, you'll want to do
@@ -667,7 +667,7 @@ $ git update-index --refresh
in the new repository to make sure that the index file is up-to-date.
Note that the second point is true even across machines. You can
-duplicate a remote git repository with *any* regular copy mechanism, be it
+duplicate a remote Git repository with *any* regular copy mechanism, be it
'scp', 'rsync' or 'wget'.
When copying a remote repository, you'll want to at a minimum update the
@@ -694,23 +694,23 @@ The above can also be written as simply
$ git reset
----------------
-and in fact a lot of the common git command combinations can be scripted
+and in fact a lot of the common Git command combinations can be scripted
with the `git xyz` interfaces. You can learn things by just looking
at what the various git scripts do. For example, `git reset` used to be
the above two lines implemented in 'git reset', but some things like
'git status' and 'git commit' are slightly more complex scripts around
-the basic git commands.
+the basic Git commands.
Many (most?) public remote repositories will not contain any of
the checked out files or even an index file, and will *only* contain the
-actual core git files. Such a repository usually doesn't even have the
-`.git` subdirectory, but has all the git files directly in the
+actual core Git files. Such a repository usually doesn't even have the
+`.git` subdirectory, but has all the Git files directly in the
repository.
-To create your own local live copy of such a "raw" git repository, you'd
+To create your own local live copy of such a "raw" Git repository, you'd
first create your own subdirectory for the project, and then copy the
raw repository contents into the `.git` directory. For example, to
-create your own copy of the git repository, you'd do the following
+create your own copy of the Git repository, you'd do the following
----------------
$ mkdir my-git
@@ -725,7 +725,7 @@ $ git read-tree HEAD
----------------
to populate the index. However, now you have populated the index, and
-you have all the git internal files, but you will notice that you don't
+you have all the Git internal files, but you will notice that you don't
actually have any of the working tree files to work on. To get
those, you'd check them out with
@@ -757,7 +757,7 @@ repository, and checked it out.
Creating a new branch
---------------------
-Branches in git are really nothing more than pointers into the git
+Branches in Git are really nothing more than pointers into the Git
object database from within the `.git/refs/` subdirectory, and as we
already discussed, the `HEAD` branch is nothing but a symlink to one of
these object pointers.
@@ -849,7 +849,7 @@ $ git commit -m "Some work." -i hello
Here, we just added another line to `hello`, and we used a shorthand for
doing both `git update-index hello` and `git commit` by just giving the
filename directly to `git commit`, with an `-i` flag (it tells
-git to 'include' that file in addition to what you have done to
+Git to 'include' that file in addition to what you have done to
the index file so far when making the commit). The `-m` flag is to give the
commit log message from the command line.
@@ -900,7 +900,7 @@ where the first argument is going to be used as the commit message if
the merge can be resolved automatically.
Now, in this case we've intentionally created a situation where the
-merge will need to be fixed up by hand, though, so git will do as much
+merge will need to be fixed up by hand, though, so Git will do as much
of it as it can automatically (which in this case is just merge the `example`
file, which had no differences in the `mybranch` branch), and say:
@@ -939,7 +939,7 @@ After you're done, start up `gitk --all` to see graphically what the
history looks like. Notice that `mybranch` still exists, and you can
switch to it, and continue to work with it if you want to. The
`mybranch` branch will not contain the merge, but next time you merge it
-from the `master` branch, git will know how you merged it, so you'll not
+from the `master` branch, Git will know how you merged it, so you'll not
have to do _that_ merge again.
Another useful tool, especially if you do not always work in X-Window
@@ -1028,7 +1028,7 @@ Merging external work
---------------------
It's usually much more common that you merge with somebody else than
-merging with your own branches, so it's worth pointing out that git
+merging with your own branches, so it's worth pointing out that Git
makes that very easy too, and in fact, it's not that different from
doing a 'git merge'. In fact, a remote merge ends up being nothing
more than "fetch the work from a remote repository into a temporary tag"
@@ -1068,7 +1068,7 @@ and requires you to have a log-in privilege over `ssh` to the
remote machine. It finds out the set of objects the other side
lacks by exchanging the head commits both ends have and
transfers (close to) minimum set of objects. It is by far the
-most efficient way to exchange git objects between repositories.
+most efficient way to exchange Git objects between repositories.
Local directory::
`/path/to/repo.git/`
@@ -1077,7 +1077,7 @@ This transport is the same as SSH transport but uses 'sh' to run
both ends on the local machine instead of running other end on
the remote machine via 'ssh'.
-git Native::
+Git Native::
`git://remote.machine/path/to/repo.git/`
+
This transport was designed for anonymous downloading. Like SSH
@@ -1099,8 +1099,8 @@ necessary objects. Because of this behavior, they are
sometimes also called 'commit walkers'.
+
The 'commit walkers' are sometimes also called 'dumb
-transports', because they do not require any git aware smart
-server like git Native transport does. Any stock HTTP server
+transports', because they do not require any Git aware smart
+server like Git Native transport does. Any stock HTTP server
that does not even support directory index would suffice. But
you must prepare your repository with 'git update-server-info'
to help dumb transport downloaders.
@@ -1321,7 +1321,7 @@ update the public repository from it. This is often called
[NOTE]
This public repository could further be mirrored, and that is
-how git repositories at `kernel.org` are managed.
+how Git repositories at `kernel.org` are managed.
Publishing the changes from your local (private) repository to
your remote (public) repository requires a write privilege on
@@ -1340,7 +1340,7 @@ done only once.
on the remote machine. The communication between the two over
the network internally uses an SSH connection.
-Your private repository's git directory is usually `.git`, but
+Your private repository's Git directory is usually `.git`, but
your public repository is often named after the project name,
i.e. `<project>.git`. Let's create such a public repository for
project `my-git`. After logging into the remote machine, create
@@ -1350,7 +1350,7 @@ an empty directory:
$ mkdir my-git.git
------------
-Then, make that directory into a git repository by running
+Then, make that directory into a Git repository by running
'git init', but this time, since its name is not the usual
`.git`, we do things slightly differently:
@@ -1389,7 +1389,7 @@ This synchronizes your public repository to match the named
branch head (i.e. `master` in this case) and objects reachable
from them in your current repository.
-As a real example, this is how I update my public git
+As a real example, this is how I update my public Git
repository. Kernel.org mirror network takes care of the
propagation to other publicly visible machines:
@@ -1402,9 +1402,9 @@ Packing your repository
-----------------------
Earlier, we saw that one file under `.git/objects/??/` directory
-is stored for each git object you create. This representation
+is stored for each Git object you create. This representation
is efficient to create atomically and safely, but
-not so convenient to transport over the network. Since git objects are
+not so convenient to transport over the network. Since Git objects are
immutable once they are created, there is a way to optimize the
storage by "packing them together". The command
@@ -1472,14 +1472,14 @@ repositories every once in a while.
Working with Others
-------------------
-Although git is a truly distributed system, it is often
+Although Git is a truly distributed system, it is often
convenient to organize your project with an informal hierarchy
of developers. Linux kernel development is run this way. There
is a nice illustration (page 17, "Merges to Mainline") in
link:http://www.xenotime.net/linux/mentor/linux-mentoring-2006.pdf[Randy Dunlap's presentation].
It should be stressed that this hierarchy is purely *informal*.
-There is nothing fundamental in git that enforces the "chain of
+There is nothing fundamental in Git that enforces the "chain of
patch flow" this hierarchy implies. You do not have to pull
from only one remote repository.
@@ -1592,7 +1592,7 @@ Working with Others, Shared Repository Style
If you are coming from CVS background, the style of cooperation
suggested in the previous section may be new to you. You do not
-have to worry. git supports "shared public repository" style of
+have to worry. Git supports "shared public repository" style of
cooperation you are probably more familiar with as well.
See linkgit:gitcvs-migration[7] for the details.
@@ -1602,7 +1602,7 @@ Bundling your work together
It is likely that you will be working on more than one thing at
a time. It is easy to manage those more-or-less independent tasks
-using branches with git.
+using branches with Git.
We have already seen how branches work previously,
with "fun and work" example using two branches. The idea is the
diff --git a/Documentation/gitcredentials.txt b/Documentation/gitcredentials.txt
index 7dfffc0..47576be 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitcredentials.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitcredentials.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ gitcredentials(7)
NAME
----
-gitcredentials - providing usernames and passwords to git
+gitcredentials - providing usernames and passwords to Git
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -18,13 +18,13 @@ DESCRIPTION
Git will sometimes need credentials from the user in order to perform
operations; for example, it may need to ask for a username and password
in order to access a remote repository over HTTP. This manual describes
-the mechanisms git uses to request these credentials, as well as some
+the mechanisms Git uses to request these credentials, as well as some
features to avoid inputting these credentials repeatedly.
REQUESTING CREDENTIALS
----------------------
-Without any credential helpers defined, git will try the following
+Without any credential helpers defined, Git will try the following
strategies to ask the user for usernames and passwords:
1. If the `GIT_ASKPASS` environment variable is set, the program
@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@ for a password. It is generally configured by adding this to your config:
username = me
---------------------------------------
-Credential helpers, on the other hand, are external programs from which git can
+Credential helpers, on the other hand, are external programs from which Git can
request both usernames and passwords; they typically interface with secure
storage provided by the OS or other programs.
@@ -79,7 +79,7 @@ store::
You may also have third-party helpers installed; search for
`credential-*` in the output of `git help -a`, and consult the
documentation of individual helpers. Once you have selected a helper,
-you can tell git to use it by putting its name into the
+you can tell Git to use it by putting its name into the
credential.helper variable.
1. Find a helper.
@@ -95,7 +95,7 @@ credential-foo
$ git help credential-foo
-------------------------------------------
-3. Tell git to use it.
+3. Tell Git to use it.
+
-------------------------------------------
$ git config --global credential.helper foo
@@ -103,7 +103,7 @@ $ git config --global credential.helper foo
If there are multiple instances of the `credential.helper` configuration
variable, each helper will be tried in turn, and may provide a username,
-password, or nothing. Once git has acquired both a username and a
+password, or nothing. Once Git has acquired both a username and a
password, no more helpers will be tried.
@@ -114,7 +114,7 @@ Git considers each credential to have a context defined by a URL. This context
is used to look up context-specific configuration, and is passed to any
helpers, which may use it as an index into secure storage.
-For instance, imagine we are accessing `https://example.com/foo.git`. When git
+For instance, imagine we are accessing `https://example.com/foo.git`. When Git
looks into a config file to see if a section matches this context, it will
consider the two a match if the context is a more-specific subset of the
pattern in the config file. For example, if you have this in your config file:
@@ -133,10 +133,10 @@ context would not match:
username = foo
--------------------------------------
-because the hostnames differ. Nor would it match `foo.example.com`; git
+because the hostnames differ. Nor would it match `foo.example.com`; Git
compares hostnames exactly, without considering whether two hosts are part of
the same domain. Likewise, a config entry for `http://example.com` would not
-match: git compares the protocols exactly.
+match: Git compares the protocols exactly.
CONFIGURATION OPTIONS
@@ -164,7 +164,7 @@ username::
useHttpPath::
- By default, git does not consider the "path" component of an http URL
+ By default, Git does not consider the "path" component of an http URL
to be worth matching via external helpers. This means that a credential
stored for `https://example.com/foo.git` will also be used for
`https://example.com/bar.git`. If you do want to distinguish these
@@ -175,7 +175,7 @@ CUSTOM HELPERS
--------------
You can write your own custom helpers to interface with any system in
-which you keep credentials. See the documentation for git's
+which you keep credentials. See the documentation for Git's
link:technical/api-credentials.html[credentials API] for details.
GIT
diff --git a/Documentation/gitcvs-migration.txt b/Documentation/gitcvs-migration.txt
index aeb0cdc..5ab5b07 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitcvs-migration.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitcvs-migration.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ gitcvs-migration(7)
NAME
----
-gitcvs-migration - git for CVS users
+gitcvs-migration - Git for CVS users
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ important than any other. However, you can emulate the CVS model by
designating a single shared repository which people can synchronize with;
this document explains how to do that.
-Some basic familiarity with git is required. Having gone through
+Some basic familiarity with Git is required. Having gone through
linkgit:gittutorial[7] and
linkgit:gitglossary[7] should be sufficient.
@@ -81,7 +81,7 @@ other than `master`.
Setting Up a Shared Repository
------------------------------
-We assume you have already created a git repository for your project,
+We assume you have already created a Git repository for your project,
possibly created from scratch or from a tarball (see
linkgit:gittutorial[7]), or imported from an already existing CVS
repository (see the next section).
@@ -101,7 +101,7 @@ Next, give every team member read/write access to this repository. One
easy way to do this is to give all the team members ssh access to the
machine where the repository is hosted. If you don't want to give them a
full shell on the machine, there is a restricted shell which only allows
-users to do git pushes and pulls; see linkgit:git-shell[1].
+users to do Git pushes and pulls; see linkgit:git-shell[1].
Put all the committers in the same group, and make the repository
writable by that group:
@@ -125,7 +125,7 @@ of the project you are interested in and run linkgit:git-cvsimport[1]:
$ git cvsimport -C <destination> <module>
-------------------------------------------
-This puts a git archive of the named CVS module in the directory
+This puts a Git archive of the named CVS module in the directory
<destination>, which will be created if necessary.
The import checks out from CVS every revision of every file. Reportedly
@@ -133,8 +133,8 @@ cvsimport can average some twenty revisions per second, so for a
medium-sized project this should not take more than a couple of minutes.
Larger projects or remote repositories may take longer.
-The main trunk is stored in the git branch named `origin`, and additional
-CVS branches are stored in git branches with the same names. The most
+The main trunk is stored in the Git branch named `origin`, and additional
+CVS branches are stored in Git branches with the same names. The most
recent version of the main trunk is also left checked out on the `master`
branch, so you can start adding your own changes right away.
@@ -160,10 +160,10 @@ You can enforce finer grained permissions using update hooks. See
link:howto/update-hook-example.txt[Controlling access to branches using
update hooks].
-Providing CVS Access to a git Repository
+Providing CVS Access to a Git Repository
----------------------------------------
-It is also possible to provide true CVS access to a git repository, so
+It is also possible to provide true CVS access to a Git repository, so
that developers can still use CVS; see linkgit:git-cvsserver[1] for
details.
@@ -171,8 +171,8 @@ Alternative Development Models
------------------------------
CVS users are accustomed to giving a group of developers commit access to
-a common repository. As we've seen, this is also possible with git.
-However, the distributed nature of git allows other development models,
+a common repository. As we've seen, this is also possible with Git.
+However, the distributed nature of Git allows other development models,
and you may want to first consider whether one of them might be a better
fit for your project.
diff --git a/Documentation/gitdiffcore.txt b/Documentation/gitdiffcore.txt
index daf1782..4ed71c7 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitdiffcore.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitdiffcore.txt
@@ -254,7 +254,7 @@ pattern. Filepairs that match a glob pattern on an earlier line
in the file are output before ones that match a later line, and
filepairs that do not match any glob pattern are output last.
-As an example, a typical orderfile for the core git probably
+As an example, a typical orderfile for the core Git probably
would look like this:
------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/Documentation/gitglossary.txt b/Documentation/gitglossary.txt
index 6d7b195..e52de7d 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitglossary.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitglossary.txt
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ SEE ALSO
linkgit:gittutorial[7],
linkgit:gittutorial-2[7],
linkgit:gitcvs-migration[7],
-link:everyday.html[Everyday git],
+link:everyday.html[Everyday Git],
link:user-manual.html[The Git User's Manual]
GIT
diff --git a/Documentation/githooks.txt b/Documentation/githooks.txt
index b9003fe..26babb3 100644
--- a/Documentation/githooks.txt
+++ b/Documentation/githooks.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ githooks(5)
NAME
----
-githooks - Hooks used by git
+githooks - Hooks used by Git
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -108,7 +108,7 @@ it is not suppressed by the `--no-verify` option. A non-zero exit
means a failure of the hook and aborts the commit. It should not
be used as replacement for pre-commit hook.
-The sample `prepare-commit-msg` hook that comes with git comments
+The sample `prepare-commit-msg` hook that comes with Git comments
out the `Conflicts:` part of a merge's commit message.
commit-msg
@@ -275,7 +275,7 @@ for the user.
The default 'post-receive' hook is empty, but there is
a sample script `post-receive-email` provided in the `contrib/hooks`
-directory in git distribution, which implements sending commit
+directory in Git distribution, which implements sending commit
emails.
[[post-update]]
@@ -303,7 +303,7 @@ them.
When enabled, the default 'post-update' hook runs
'git update-server-info' to keep the information used by dumb
transports (e.g., HTTP) up-to-date. If you are publishing
-a git repository that is accessible via HTTP, you should
+a Git repository that is accessible via HTTP, you should
probably enable this hook.
Both standard output and standard error output are forwarded to
diff --git a/Documentation/gitignore.txt b/Documentation/gitignore.txt
index 91a6438..bc7a046 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitignore.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitignore.txt
@@ -13,12 +13,12 @@ DESCRIPTION
-----------
A `gitignore` file specifies intentionally untracked files that
-git should ignore.
-Files already tracked by git are not affected; see the NOTES
+Git should ignore.
+Files already tracked by Git are not affected; see the NOTES
below for details.
Each line in a `gitignore` file specifies a pattern.
-When deciding whether to ignore a path, git normally checks
+When deciding whether to ignore a path, Git normally checks
`gitignore` patterns from multiple sources, with the following
order of precedence, from highest to lowest (within one level of
precedence, the last matching pattern decides the outcome):
@@ -53,17 +53,17 @@ be used.
the repository but are specific to one user's workflow) should go into
the `$GIT_DIR/info/exclude` file.
- * Patterns which a user wants git to
+ * Patterns which a user wants Git to
ignore in all situations (e.g., backup or temporary files generated by
the user's editor of choice) generally go into a file specified by
`core.excludesfile` in the user's `~/.gitconfig`. Its default value is
$XDG_CONFIG_HOME/git/ignore. If $XDG_CONFIG_HOME is either not set or
empty, $HOME/.config/git/ignore is used instead.
-The underlying git plumbing tools, such as
+The underlying Git plumbing tools, such as
'git ls-files' and 'git read-tree', read
`gitignore` patterns specified by command-line options, or from
-files specified by command-line options. Higher-level git
+files specified by command-line options. Higher-level Git
tools, such as 'git status' and 'git add',
use patterns from the sources specified above.
@@ -89,15 +89,15 @@ PATTERN FORMAT
a match with a directory. In other words, `foo/` will match a
directory `foo` and paths underneath it, but will not match a
regular file or a symbolic link `foo` (this is consistent
- with the way how pathspec works in general in git).
+ with the way how pathspec works in general in Git).
- - If the pattern does not contain a slash '/', git treats it as
+ - If the pattern does not contain a slash '/', Git treats it as
a shell glob pattern and checks for a match against the
pathname relative to the location of the `.gitignore` file
(relative to the toplevel of the work tree if not from a
`.gitignore` file).
- - Otherwise, git treats the pattern as a shell glob suitable
+ - Otherwise, Git treats the pattern as a shell glob suitable
for consumption by fnmatch(3) with the FNM_PATHNAME flag:
wildcards in the pattern will not match a / in the pathname.
For example, "Documentation/{asterisk}.html" matches
@@ -131,7 +131,7 @@ NOTES
-----
The purpose of gitignore files is to ensure that certain files
-not tracked by git remain untracked.
+not tracked by Git remain untracked.
To ignore uncommitted changes in a file that is already tracked,
use 'git update-index {litdd}assume-unchanged'.
@@ -179,7 +179,7 @@ Another example:
$ echo '!/vmlinux*' >arch/foo/kernel/.gitignore
--------------------------------------------------------------
-The second .gitignore prevents git from ignoring
+The second .gitignore prevents Git from ignoring
`arch/foo/kernel/vmlinux.lds.S`.
SEE ALSO
diff --git a/Documentation/gitk.txt b/Documentation/gitk.txt
index a17a354..c17e760 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitk.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitk.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ gitk(1)
NAME
----
-gitk - The git repository browser
+gitk - The Git repository browser
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@ the files in the trees of each revision.
Historically, gitk was the first repository browser. It's written in tcl/tk
and started off in a separate repository but was later merged into the main
-git repository.
+Git repository.
OPTIONS
-------
@@ -108,10 +108,10 @@ SEE ALSO
'gitview(1)'::
A repository browser written in Python using Gtk. It's based on
- 'bzrk(1)' and distributed in the contrib area of the git repository.
+ 'bzrk(1)' and distributed in the contrib area of the Git repository.
'tig(1)'::
- A minimal repository browser and git tool output highlighter written
+ A minimal repository browser and Git tool output highlighter written
in C using Ncurses.
GIT
diff --git a/Documentation/gitmodules.txt b/Documentation/gitmodules.txt
index 52d7ae4..6a1ca4a 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitmodules.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitmodules.txt
@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ $GIT_WORK_DIR/.gitmodules
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-The `.gitmodules` file, located in the top-level directory of a git
+The `.gitmodules` file, located in the top-level directory of a Git
working tree, is a text file with a syntax matching the requirements
of linkgit:git-config[1].
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ option of 'git submodule add'. Each submodule section also contains the
following required keys:
submodule.<name>.path::
- Defines the path, relative to the top-level directory of the git
+ Defines the path, relative to the top-level directory of the Git
working tree, where the submodule is expected to be checked out.
The path name must not end with a `/`. All submodule paths must
be unique within the .gitmodules file.
diff --git a/Documentation/gitnamespaces.txt b/Documentation/gitnamespaces.txt
index c6713cf..7685e36 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitnamespaces.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitnamespaces.txt
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ prevent duplication between new objects added to the repositories
without ongoing maintenance, while namespaces do.
To specify a namespace, set the `GIT_NAMESPACE` environment variable to
-the namespace. For each ref namespace, git stores the corresponding
+the namespace. For each ref namespace, Git stores the corresponding
refs in a directory under `refs/namespaces/`. For example,
`GIT_NAMESPACE=foo` will store refs under `refs/namespaces/foo/`. You
can also specify namespaces via the `--namespace` option to
diff --git a/Documentation/gitrepository-layout.txt b/Documentation/gitrepository-layout.txt
index 9f62886..5f8d545 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitrepository-layout.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitrepository-layout.txt
@@ -12,12 +12,12 @@ $GIT_DIR/*
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-You may find these things in your git repository (`.git`
+You may find these things in your Git repository (`.git`
directory for a repository associated with your working tree, or
`<project>.git` directory for a public 'bare' repository. It is
also possible to have a working tree where `.git` is a plain
ASCII file containing `gitdir: <path>`, i.e. the path to the
-real git repository).
+real Git repository).
objects::
Object store associated with this repository. Usually
@@ -108,7 +108,7 @@ HEAD::
A symref (see glossary) to the `refs/heads/` namespace
describing the currently active branch. It does not mean
much if the repository is not associated with any working tree
- (i.e. a 'bare' repository), but a valid git repository
+ (i.e. a 'bare' repository), but a valid Git repository
*must* have the HEAD file; some porcelains may use it to
guess the designated "default" branch of the repository
(usually 'master'). It is legal if the named branch
@@ -131,7 +131,7 @@ branches::
and not likely to be found in modern repositories.
hooks::
- Hooks are customization scripts used by various git
+ Hooks are customization scripts used by various Git
commands. A handful of sample hooks are installed when
'git init' is run, but all of them are disabled by
default. To enable, the `.sample` suffix has to be
@@ -169,7 +169,7 @@ info/exclude::
This file, by convention among Porcelains, stores the
exclude pattern list. `.gitignore` is the per-directory
ignore file. 'git status', 'git add', 'git rm' and
- 'git clean' look at it but the core git commands do not look
+ 'git clean' look at it but the core Git commands do not look
at it. See also: linkgit:gitignore[5].
remotes::
diff --git a/Documentation/gitrevisions.txt b/Documentation/gitrevisions.txt
index fc4789f..c0ed6d1 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitrevisions.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitrevisions.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ gitrevisions(7)
NAME
----
-gitrevisions - specifying revisions and ranges for git
+gitrevisions - specifying revisions and ranges for Git
SYNOPSIS
--------
diff --git a/Documentation/gittutorial-2.txt b/Documentation/gittutorial-2.txt
index e00a4d2..94c906e 100644
--- a/Documentation/gittutorial-2.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gittutorial-2.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ gittutorial-2(7)
NAME
----
-gittutorial-2 - A tutorial introduction to git: part two
+gittutorial-2 - A tutorial introduction to Git: part two
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -16,11 +16,11 @@ DESCRIPTION
You should work through linkgit:gittutorial[7] before reading this tutorial.
The goal of this tutorial is to introduce two fundamental pieces of
-git's architecture--the object database and the index file--and to
+Git's architecture--the object database and the index file--and to
provide the reader with everything necessary to understand the rest
-of the git documentation.
+of the Git documentation.
-The git object database
+The Git object database
-----------------------
Let's start a new project and create a small amount of history:
@@ -42,14 +42,14 @@ $ git commit -a -m "add emphasis"
1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)
------------------------------------------------
-What are the 7 digits of hex that git responded to the commit with?
+What are the 7 digits of hex that Git responded to the commit with?
We saw in part one of the tutorial that commits have names like this.
-It turns out that every object in the git history is stored under
+It turns out that every object in the Git history is stored under
a 40-digit hex name. That name is the SHA1 hash of the object's
-contents; among other things, this ensures that git will never store
+contents; among other things, this ensures that Git will never store
the same data twice (since identical data is given an identical SHA1
-name), and that the contents of a git object will never change (since
+name), and that the contents of a Git object will never change (since
that would change the object's name as well). The 7 char hex strings
here are simply the abbreviation of such 40 character long strings.
Abbreviations can be used everywhere where the 40 character strings
@@ -60,7 +60,7 @@ following the example above generates a different SHA1 hash than
the one shown above because the commit object records the time when
it was created and the name of the person performing the commit.
-We can ask git about this particular object with the `cat-file`
+We can ask Git about this particular object with the `cat-file`
command. Don't copy the 40 hex digits from this example but use those
from your own version. Note that you can shorten it to only a few
characters to save yourself typing all 40 hex digits:
@@ -102,11 +102,11 @@ $ git cat-file blob 3b18e512
hello world
------------------------------------------------
-Note that this is the old file data; so the object that git named in
+Note that this is the old file data; so the object that Git named in
its response to the initial tree was a tree with a snapshot of the
directory state that was recorded by the first commit.
-All of these objects are stored under their SHA1 names inside the git
+All of these objects are stored under their SHA1 names inside the Git
directory:
------------------------------------------------
@@ -191,7 +191,7 @@ Besides blobs, trees, and commits, the only remaining type of object
is a "tag", which we won't discuss here; refer to linkgit:git-tag[1]
for details.
-So now we know how git uses the object database to represent a
+So now we know how Git uses the object database to represent a
project's history:
* "commit" objects refer to "tree" objects representing the
@@ -403,21 +403,21 @@ What next?
At this point you should know everything necessary to read the man
pages for any of the git commands; one good place to start would be
-with the commands mentioned in link:everyday.html[Everyday git]. You
+with the commands mentioned in link:everyday.html[Everyday Git]. You
should be able to find any unknown jargon in linkgit:gitglossary[7].
The link:user-manual.html[Git User's Manual] provides a more
-comprehensive introduction to git.
+comprehensive introduction to Git.
linkgit:gitcvs-migration[7] explains how to
-import a CVS repository into git, and shows how to use git in a
+import a CVS repository into Git, and shows how to use Git in a
CVS-like way.
-For some interesting examples of git use, see the
+For some interesting examples of Git use, see the
link:howto-index.html[howtos].
-For git developers, linkgit:gitcore-tutorial[7] goes
-into detail on the lower-level git mechanisms involved in, for
+For Git developers, linkgit:gitcore-tutorial[7] goes
+into detail on the lower-level Git mechanisms involved in, for
example, creating a new commit.
SEE ALSO
@@ -427,7 +427,7 @@ linkgit:gitcvs-migration[7],
linkgit:gitcore-tutorial[7],
linkgit:gitglossary[7],
linkgit:git-help[1],
-link:everyday.html[Everyday git],
+link:everyday.html[Everyday Git],
link:user-manual.html[The Git User's Manual]
GIT
diff --git a/Documentation/gittutorial.txt b/Documentation/gittutorial.txt
index 9dd45c4..8262196 100644
--- a/Documentation/gittutorial.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gittutorial.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ gittutorial(7)
NAME
----
-gittutorial - A tutorial introduction to git (for version 1.5.1 or newer)
+gittutorial - A tutorial introduction to Git (for version 1.5.1 or newer)
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -13,10 +13,10 @@ git *
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-This tutorial explains how to import a new project into git, make
+This tutorial explains how to import a new project into Git, make
changes to it, and share changes with other developers.
-If you are instead primarily interested in using git to fetch a project,
+If you are instead primarily interested in using Git to fetch a project,
for example, to test the latest version, you may prefer to start with
the first two chapters of link:user-manual.html[The Git User's Manual].
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ $ git help log
With the latter, you can use the manual viewer of your choice; see
linkgit:git-help[1] for more information.
-It is a good idea to introduce yourself to git with your name and
+It is a good idea to introduce yourself to Git with your name and
public email address before doing any operation. The easiest
way to do so is:
@@ -50,7 +50,7 @@ Importing a new project
-----------------------
Assume you have a tarball project.tar.gz with your initial work. You
-can place it under git revision control as follows.
+can place it under Git revision control as follows.
------------------------------------------------
$ tar xzf project.tar.gz
@@ -67,14 +67,14 @@ Initialized empty Git repository in .git/
You've now initialized the working directory--you may notice a new
directory created, named ".git".
-Next, tell git to take a snapshot of the contents of all files under the
+Next, tell Git to take a snapshot of the contents of all files under the
current directory (note the '.'), with 'git add':
------------------------------------------------
$ git add .
------------------------------------------------
-This snapshot is now stored in a temporary staging area which git calls
+This snapshot is now stored in a temporary staging area which Git calls
the "index". You can permanently store the contents of the index in the
repository with 'git commit':
@@ -83,7 +83,7 @@ $ git commit
------------------------------------------------
This will prompt you for a commit message. You've now stored the first
-version of your project in git.
+version of your project in Git.
Making changes
--------------
@@ -141,7 +141,7 @@ begin the commit message with a single short (less than 50 character)
line summarizing the change, followed by a blank line and then a more
thorough description. The text up to the first blank line in a commit
message is treated as the commit title, and that title is used
-throughout git. For example, linkgit:git-format-patch[1] turns a
+throughout Git. For example, linkgit:git-format-patch[1] turns a
commit into email, and it uses the title on the Subject line and the
rest of the commit in the body.
@@ -180,7 +180,7 @@ $ git log --stat --summary
Managing branches
-----------------
-A single git repository can maintain multiple branches of
+A single Git repository can maintain multiple branches of
development. To create a new branch named "experimental", use
------------------------------------------------
@@ -276,10 +276,10 @@ $ git branch -D crazy-idea
Branches are cheap and easy, so this is a good way to try something
out.
-Using git for collaboration
+Using Git for collaboration
---------------------------
-Suppose that Alice has started a new project with a git repository in
+Suppose that Alice has started a new project with a Git repository in
/home/alice/project, and that Bob, who has a home directory on the
same machine, wants to contribute.
@@ -320,7 +320,7 @@ Note that in general, Alice would want her local changes committed before
initiating this "pull". If Bob's work conflicts with what Alice did since
their histories forked, Alice will use her working tree and the index to
resolve conflicts, and existing local changes will interfere with the
-conflict resolution process (git will still perform the fetch but will
+conflict resolution process (Git will still perform the fetch but will
refuse to merge --- Alice will have to get rid of her local changes in
some way and pull again when this happens).
@@ -422,7 +422,7 @@ bob$ git pull
-------------------------------------
Note that he doesn't need to give the path to Alice's repository;
-when Bob cloned Alice's repository, git stored the location of her
+when Bob cloned Alice's repository, Git stored the location of her
repository in the repository configuration, and that location is
used for pulls:
@@ -450,7 +450,7 @@ perform clones and pulls using the ssh protocol:
bob$ git clone alice.org:/home/alice/project myrepo
-------------------------------------
-Alternatively, git has a native protocol, or can use rsync or http;
+Alternatively, Git has a native protocol, or can use rsync or http;
see linkgit:git-pull[1] for details.
Git can also be used in a CVS-like mode, with a central repository
@@ -518,7 +518,7 @@ share this name with other people (for example, to identify a release
version), you should create a "tag" object, and perhaps sign it; see
linkgit:git-tag[1] for details.
-Any git command that needs to know a commit can take any of these
+Any Git command that needs to know a commit can take any of these
names. For example:
-------------------------------------
@@ -554,9 +554,9 @@ files it manages in your current directory. So
$ git grep "hello"
-------------------------------------
-is a quick way to search just the files that are tracked by git.
+is a quick way to search just the files that are tracked by Git.
-Many git commands also take sets of commits, which can be specified
+Many Git commands also take sets of commits, which can be specified
in a number of ways. Here are some examples with 'git log':
-------------------------------------
@@ -592,7 +592,7 @@ then merged back together, the order in which 'git log' presents
those commits is meaningless.
Most projects with multiple contributors (such as the Linux kernel,
-or git itself) have frequent merges, and 'gitk' does a better job of
+or Git itself) have frequent merges, and 'gitk' does a better job of
visualizing their history. For example,
-------------------------------------
@@ -623,7 +623,7 @@ Next Steps
This tutorial should be enough to perform basic distributed revision
control for your projects. However, to fully understand the depth
-and power of git you need to understand two simple ideas on which it
+and power of Git you need to understand two simple ideas on which it
is based:
* The object database is the rather elegant system used to
@@ -636,7 +636,7 @@ is based:
Part two of this tutorial explains the object
database, the index file, and a few other odds and ends that you'll
-need to make the most of git. You can find it at linkgit:gittutorial-2[7].
+need to make the most of Git. You can find it at linkgit:gittutorial-2[7].
If you don't want to continue with that right away, a few other
digressions that may be interesting at this point are:
@@ -668,7 +668,7 @@ linkgit:gitcore-tutorial[7],
linkgit:gitglossary[7],
linkgit:git-help[1],
linkgit:gitworkflows[7],
-link:everyday.html[Everyday git],
+link:everyday.html[Everyday Git],
link:user-manual.html[The Git User's Manual]
GIT
diff --git a/Documentation/gitweb.conf.txt b/Documentation/gitweb.conf.txt
index 4947455..eb63631 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitweb.conf.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitweb.conf.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ gitweb.conf(5)
NAME
----
-gitweb.conf - Gitweb (git web interface) configuration file
+gitweb.conf - Gitweb (Git web interface) configuration file
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -79,7 +79,7 @@ stops declaring it.
You can include other configuration file using read_config_file()
subroutine. For example, one might want to put gitweb configuration
related to access control for viewing repositories via Gitolite (one
-of git repository management tools) in a separate file, e.g. in
+of Git repository management tools) in a separate file, e.g. in
'/etc/gitweb-gitolite.conf'. To include it, put
--------------------------------------------------
@@ -111,7 +111,7 @@ and installing gitweb.
Location of repositories
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The configuration variables described below control how gitweb finds
-git repositories, and how repositories are displayed and accessed.
+Git repositories, and how repositories are displayed and accessed.
See also "Repositories" and later subsections in linkgit:gitweb[1] manpage.
@@ -159,7 +159,7 @@ will fall back to scanning the `$projectroot` directory for repositories.
$project_maxdepth::
If `$projects_list` variable is unset, gitweb will recursively
- scan filesystem for git repositories. The `$project_maxdepth`
+ scan filesystem for Git repositories. The `$project_maxdepth`
is used to limit traversing depth, relative to `$projectroot`
(starting point); it means that directories which are further
from `$projectroot` than `$project_maxdepth` will be skipped.
@@ -200,7 +200,7 @@ our $export_ok = "git-daemon-export-ok";
+
If not set (default), it means that this feature is disabled.
+
-See also more involved example in "Controlling access to git repositories"
+See also more involved example in "Controlling access to Git repositories"
subsection on linkgit:gitweb[1] manpage.
$strict_export::
@@ -222,18 +222,18 @@ The values of these variables are paths on the filesystem.
$GIT::
Core git executable to use. By default set to `$GIT_BINDIR/git`, which
- in turn is by default set to `$(bindir)/git`. If you use git installed
+ in turn is by default set to `$(bindir)/git`. If you use Git installed
from a binary package, you should usually set this to "/usr/bin/git".
This can just be "git" if your web server has a sensible PATH; from
security point of view it is better to use absolute path to git binary.
- If you have multiple git versions installed it can be used to choose
+ If you have multiple Git versions installed it can be used to choose
which one to use. Must be (correctly) set for gitweb to be able to
work.
$mimetypes_file::
File to use for (filename extension based) guessing of MIME types before
trying '/etc/mime.types'. *NOTE* that this path, if relative, is taken
- as relative to the current git repository, not to CGI script. If unset,
+ as relative to the current Git repository, not to CGI script. If unset,
only '/etc/mime.types' is used (if present on filesystem). If no mimetypes
file is found, mimetype guessing based on extension of file is disabled.
Unset by default.
@@ -343,8 +343,8 @@ $logo_url::
$logo_label::
URI and label (title) for the Git logo link (or your site logo,
if you chose to use different logo image). By default, these both
- refer to git homepage, http://git-scm.com[]; in the past, they pointed
- to git documentation at http://www.kernel.org[].
+ refer to Git homepage, http://git-scm.com[]; in the past, they pointed
+ to Git documentation at http://www.kernel.org[].
Changing gitweb's look
@@ -436,7 +436,7 @@ $fallback_encoding::
detection.
+
*Note* that rename and especially copy detection can be quite
-CPU-intensive. Note also that non git tools can have problems with
+CPU-intensive. Note also that non Git tools can have problems with
patches generated with options mentioned above, especially when they
involve file copies (\'-C') or criss-cross renames (\'-B').
@@ -451,7 +451,7 @@ looks does contain variables configuring administrative side of gitweb
affects how "summary" pages look like, or load limiting).
@git_base_url_list::
- List of git base URLs. These URLs are used to generate URLs
+ List of Git base URLs. These URLs are used to generate URLs
describing from where to fetch a project, which are shown on
project summary page. The full fetch URL is "`$git_base_url/$project`",
for each element of this list. You can set up multiple base URLs
@@ -616,7 +616,7 @@ override::
(or enabled/disabled) on a per-repository basis.
+
Usually given "<feature>" is configurable via the `gitweb.<feature>`
-config variable in the per-repository git configuration file.
+config variable in the per-repository Git configuration file.
+
*Note* that no feature is overriddable by default.
@@ -782,7 +782,7 @@ filesystem (i.e. "$projectroot/$project"), `%h` to the current hash
(\'hb' gitweb parameter); `%%` expands to \'%'.
+
For example, at the time this page was written, the http://repo.or.cz[]
-git hosting site set it to the following to enable graphical log
+Git hosting site set it to the following to enable graphical log
(using the third party tool *git-browser*):
+
----------------------------------------------------------------------
@@ -796,10 +796,10 @@ This adds a link titled "graphiclog" after the "summary" link, leading to
Project specific override is not supported.
timed::
- Enable displaying how much time and how many git commands it took to
+ Enable displaying how much time and how many Git commands it took to
generate and display each page in the page footer (at the bottom of
page). For example the footer might contain: "This page took 6.53325
- seconds and 13 git commands to generate." Disabled by default.
+ seconds and 13 Git commands to generate." Disabled by default.
+
Project specific override is not supported.
diff --git a/Documentation/gitweb.txt b/Documentation/gitweb.txt
index d364c3a..40969f1 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitweb.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitweb.txt
@@ -7,14 +7,14 @@ gitweb - Git web interface (web frontend to Git repositories)
SYNOPSIS
--------
-To get started with gitweb, run linkgit:git-instaweb[1] from a git repository.
+To get started with gitweb, run linkgit:git-instaweb[1] from a Git repository.
This would configure and start your web server, and run web browser pointing to
gitweb.
DESCRIPTION
-----------
-Gitweb provides a web interface to git repositories. Its features include:
+Gitweb provides a web interface to Git repositories. Its features include:
* Viewing multiple Git repositories with common root.
* Browsing every revision of the repository.
@@ -54,9 +54,9 @@ our $projectroot = '/path/to/parent/directory';
The default value for `$projectroot` is '/pub/git'. You can change it during
building gitweb via `GITWEB_PROJECTROOT` build configuration variable.
-By default all git repositories under `$projectroot` are visible and available
+By default all Git repositories under `$projectroot` are visible and available
to gitweb. The list of projects is generated by default by scanning the
-`$projectroot` directory for git repositories (for object databases to be
+`$projectroot` directory for Git repositories (for object databases to be
more exact; gitweb is not interested in a working area, and is best suited
to showing "bare" repositories).
@@ -111,7 +111,7 @@ foo/bar.git O+W+Ner+<owner@example.org>
By default this file controls only which projects are *visible* on projects
-list page (note that entries that do not point to correctly recognized git
+list page (note that entries that do not point to correctly recognized Git
repositories won't be displayed by gitweb). Even if a project is not
visible on projects list page, you can view it nevertheless by hand-crafting
a gitweb URL. By setting `$strict_export` configuration variable (see
@@ -151,9 +151,9 @@ as projects list file, which means that you can set `$projects_list` to its
filename.
-Controlling access to git repositories
+Controlling access to Git repositories
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-By default all git repositories under `$projectroot` are visible and
+By default all Git repositories under `$projectroot` are visible and
available to gitweb. You can however configure how gitweb controls access
to repositories.
@@ -206,7 +206,7 @@ $export_auth_hook = sub {
Per-repository gitweb configuration
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
You can configure individual repositories shown in gitweb by creating file
-in the 'GIT_DIR' of git repository, or by setting some repo configuration
+in the 'GIT_DIR' of Git repository, or by setting some repo configuration
variable (in 'GIT_DIR/config', see linkgit:git-config[1]).
You can use the following files in repository:
@@ -584,7 +584,7 @@ $projectroot = $ENV{'GITWEB_PROJECTROOT'} || "/pub/git";
referenced by `$per_request_config`;
These configurations enable two things. First, each unix user (`<user>`) of
-the server will be able to browse through gitweb git repositories found in
+the server will be able to browse through gitweb Git repositories found in
'~/public_git/' with the following url:
http://git.example.org/~<user>/
@@ -673,7 +673,7 @@ The additional AliasMatch makes it so that
http://git.example.com/project.git
-will give raw access to the project's git dir (so that the project can be
+will give raw access to the project's Git dir (so that the project can be
cloned), while
http://git.example.com/project
diff --git a/Documentation/gitworkflows.txt b/Documentation/gitworkflows.txt
index e2e7d65..f16c414 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitworkflows.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitworkflows.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ gitworkflows(7)
NAME
----
-gitworkflows - An overview of recommended workflows with git
+gitworkflows - An overview of recommended workflows with Git
SYNOPSIS
--------
@@ -245,7 +245,7 @@ tag to the tip of 'master' indicating the release version:
`git tag -s -m "Git X.Y.Z" vX.Y.Z master`
=====================================
-You need to push the new tag to a public git server (see
+You need to push the new tag to a public Git server (see
"DISTRIBUTED WORKFLOWS" below). This makes the tag available to
others tracking your project. The push could also trigger a
post-update hook to perform release-related items such as building
diff --git a/Documentation/glossary-content.txt b/Documentation/glossary-content.txt
index 7c28aef..7c15bc0 100644
--- a/Documentation/glossary-content.txt
+++ b/Documentation/glossary-content.txt
@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@
A bare repository is normally an appropriately
named <<def_directory,directory>> with a `.git` suffix that does not
have a locally checked-out copy of any of the files under
- revision control. That is, all of the `git`
+ revision control. That is, all of the Git
administrative and control files that would normally be present in the
hidden `.git` sub-directory are directly present in the
`repository.git` directory instead,
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@
<<def_commit,commit>> on a branch is referred to as the tip of
that branch. The tip of the branch is referenced by a branch
<<def_head,head>>, which moves forward as additional development
- is done on the branch. A single git
+ is done on the branch. A single Git
<<def_repository,repository>> can track an arbitrary number of
branches, but your <<def_working_tree,working tree>> is
associated with just one of them (the "current" or "checked out"
@@ -37,9 +37,9 @@
<<def_commit,commit>> could be one of its <<def_parent,parents>>).
[[def_changeset]]changeset::
- BitKeeper/cvsps speak for "<<def_commit,commit>>". Since git does not
+ BitKeeper/cvsps speak for "<<def_commit,commit>>". Since Git does not
store changes, but states, it really does not make sense to use the term
- "changesets" with git.
+ "changesets" with Git.
[[def_checkout]]checkout::
The action of updating all or part of the
@@ -64,14 +64,14 @@
[[def_commit]]commit::
As a noun: A single point in the
- git history; the entire history of a project is represented as a
+ Git history; the entire history of a project is represented as a
set of interrelated commits. The word "commit" is often
- used by git in the same places other revision control systems
+ used by Git in the same places other revision control systems
use the words "revision" or "version". Also used as a short
hand for <<def_commit_object,commit object>>.
+
As a verb: The action of storing a new snapshot of the project's
-state in the git history, by creating a new commit representing the current
+state in the Git history, by creating a new commit representing the current
state of the <<def_index,index>> and advancing <<def_HEAD,HEAD>>
to point at the new commit.
@@ -82,8 +82,8 @@ to point at the new commit.
to the top <<def_directory,directory>> of the stored
revision.
-[[def_core_git]]core git::
- Fundamental data structures and utilities of git. Exposes only limited
+[[def_core_git]]core Git::
+ Fundamental data structures and utilities of Git. Exposes only limited
source code management tools.
[[def_DAG]]DAG::
@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@ to point at the new commit.
[[def_detached_HEAD]]detached HEAD::
Normally the <<def_HEAD,HEAD>> stores the name of a
- <<def_branch,branch>>. However, git also allows you to <<def_checkout,check out>>
+ <<def_branch,branch>>. However, Git also allows you to <<def_checkout,check out>>
an arbitrary <<def_commit,commit>> that isn't necessarily the tip of any
particular branch. In this case HEAD is said to be "detached".
@@ -142,22 +142,22 @@ to point at the new commit.
and to get them, too. See also linkgit:git-fetch[1].
[[def_file_system]]file system::
- Linus Torvalds originally designed git to be a user space file system,
+ Linus Torvalds originally designed Git to be a user space file system,
i.e. the infrastructure to hold files and directories. That ensured the
- efficiency and speed of git.
+ efficiency and speed of Git.
-[[def_git_archive]]git archive::
+[[def_git_archive]]Git archive::
Synonym for <<def_repository,repository>> (for arch people).
[[def_grafts]]grafts::
Grafts enables two otherwise different lines of development to be joined
together by recording fake ancestry information for commits. This way
- you can make git pretend the set of <<def_parent,parents>> a <<def_commit,commit>> has
+ you can make Git pretend the set of <<def_parent,parents>> a <<def_commit,commit>> has
is different from what was recorded when the commit was
created. Configured via the `.git/info/grafts` file.
[[def_hash]]hash::
- In git's context, synonym to <<def_object_name,object name>>.
+ In Git's context, synonym to <<def_object_name,object name>>.
[[def_head]]head::
A <<def_ref,named reference>> to the <<def_commit,commit>> at the tip of a
@@ -177,14 +177,14 @@ to point at the new commit.
A synonym for <<def_head,head>>.
[[def_hook]]hook::
- During the normal execution of several git commands, call-outs are made
+ During the normal execution of several Git commands, call-outs are made
to optional scripts that allow a developer to add functionality or
checking. Typically, the hooks allow for a command to be pre-verified
and potentially aborted, and allow for a post-notification after the
operation is done. The hook scripts are found in the
`$GIT_DIR/hooks/` directory, and are enabled by simply
removing the `.sample` suffix from the filename. In earlier versions
- of git you had to make them executable.
+ of Git you had to make them executable.
[[def_index]]index::
A collection of files with stat information, whose contents are stored
@@ -201,7 +201,7 @@ to point at the new commit.
[[def_master]]master::
The default development <<def_branch,branch>>. Whenever you
- create a git <<def_repository,repository>>, a branch named
+ create a Git <<def_repository,repository>>, a branch named
"master" is created, and becomes the active branch. In most
cases, this contains the local development, though that is
purely by convention and is not required.
@@ -228,7 +228,7 @@ This commit is referred to as a "merge commit", or sometimes just a
"merge".
[[def_object]]object::
- The unit of storage in git. It is uniquely identified by the
+ The unit of storage in Git. It is uniquely identified by the
<<def_SHA1,SHA1>> of its contents. Consequently, an
object can not be changed.
@@ -323,7 +323,7 @@ top `/`;;
+
Currently only the slash `/` is recognized as the "magic signature",
but it is envisioned that we will support more types of magic in later
-versions of git.
+versions of Git.
+
A pathspec with only a colon means "there is no pathspec". This form
should not be combined with other pathspec.
@@ -341,12 +341,12 @@ should not be combined with other pathspec.
particular line of text. See linkgit:git-diff[1].
[[def_plumbing]]plumbing::
- Cute name for <<def_core_git,core git>>.
+ Cute name for <<def_core_git,core Git>>.
[[def_porcelain]]porcelain::
Cute name for programs and program suites depending on
- <<def_core_git,core git>>, presenting a high level access to
- core git. Porcelains expose more of a <<def_SCM,SCM>>
+ <<def_core_git,core Git>>, presenting a high level access to
+ core Git. Porcelains expose more of a <<def_SCM,SCM>>
interface than the <<def_plumbing,plumbing>>.
[[def_pull]]pull::
@@ -406,7 +406,7 @@ should not be combined with other pathspec.
linkgit:git-push[1].
[[def_remote_tracking_branch]]remote-tracking branch::
- A regular git <<def_branch,branch>> that is used to follow changes from
+ A regular Git <<def_branch,branch>> that is used to follow changes from
another <<def_repository,repository>>. A remote-tracking
branch should not contain direct modifications or have local commits
made to it. A remote-tracking branch can usually be
@@ -443,7 +443,7 @@ should not be combined with other pathspec.
[[def_shallow_repository]]shallow repository::
A shallow <<def_repository,repository>> has an incomplete
history some of whose <<def_commit,commits>> have <<def_parent,parents>> cauterized away (in other
- words, git is told to pretend that these commits do not have the
+ words, Git is told to pretend that these commits do not have the
parents, even though they are recorded in the <<def_commit_object,commit
object>>). This is sometimes useful when you are interested only in the
recent history of a project even though the real history recorded in the
@@ -464,9 +464,9 @@ should not be combined with other pathspec.
object of an arbitrary type (typically a tag points to either a
<<def_tag_object,tag>> or a <<def_commit_object,commit object>>).
In contrast to a <<def_head,head>>, a tag is not updated by
- the `commit` command. A git tag has nothing to do with a Lisp
+ the `commit` command. A Git tag has nothing to do with a Lisp
tag (which would be called an <<def_object_type,object type>>
- in git's context). A tag is most typically used to mark a particular
+ in Git's context). A tag is most typically used to mark a particular
point in the commit ancestry <<def_chain,chain>>.
[[def_tag_object]]tag object::
@@ -476,7 +476,7 @@ should not be combined with other pathspec.
signature, in which case it is called a "signed tag object".
[[def_topic_branch]]topic branch::
- A regular git <<def_branch,branch>> that is used by a developer to
+ A regular Git <<def_branch,branch>> that is used by a developer to
identify a conceptual line of development. Since branches are very easy
and inexpensive, it is often desirable to have several small branches
that each contain very well defined concepts or small incremental yet
diff --git a/Documentation/howto-index.sh b/Documentation/howto-index.sh
index 8e82e52..a234086 100755
--- a/Documentation/howto-index.sh
+++ b/Documentation/howto-index.sh
@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ Git Howto Index
===============
Here is a collection of mailing list postings made by various
-people describing how they use git in their workflow.
+people describing how they use Git in their workflow.
EOF
diff --git a/Documentation/howto/maintain-git.txt b/Documentation/howto/maintain-git.txt
index ea6e4a5..8671573 100644
--- a/Documentation/howto/maintain-git.txt
+++ b/Documentation/howto/maintain-git.txt
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
From: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Nov 2007 16:32:55 -0800
Subject: Addendum to "MaintNotes"
-Abstract: Imagine that git development is racing along as usual, when our friendly
+Abstract: Imagine that Git development is racing along as usual, when our friendly
neighborhood maintainer is struck down by a wayward bus. Out of the
hordes of suckers (loyal developers), you have been tricked (chosen) to
step up as the new maintainer. This howto will show you "how to" do it.
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ Content-type: text/asciidoc
How to maintain Git
===================
-The maintainer's git time is spent on three activities.
+The maintainer's Git time is spent on three activities.
- Communication (60%)
@@ -77,7 +77,7 @@ The policy.
are found before new topics are merged to 'master'.
-A typical git day for the maintainer implements the above policy
+A typical Git day for the maintainer implements the above policy
by doing the following:
- Scan mailing list and #git channel log. Respond with review
diff --git a/Documentation/howto/new-command.txt b/Documentation/howto/new-command.txt
index 36502f6..2abc3a0 100644
--- a/Documentation/howto/new-command.txt
+++ b/Documentation/howto/new-command.txt
@@ -1,25 +1,25 @@
From: Eric S. Raymond <esr@thyrsus.com>
Abstract: This is how-to documentation for people who want to add extension
- commands to git. It should be read alongside api-builtin.txt.
+ commands to Git. It should be read alongside api-builtin.txt.
Content-type: text/asciidoc
How to integrate new subcommands
================================
This is how-to documentation for people who want to add extension
-commands to git. It should be read alongside api-builtin.txt.
+commands to Git. It should be read alongside api-builtin.txt.
Runtime environment
-------------------
-git subcommands are standalone executables that live in the git exec
+Git subcommands are standalone executables that live in the Git exec
path, normally /usr/lib/git-core. The git executable itself is a
thin wrapper that knows where the subcommands live, and runs them by
passing command-line arguments to them.
-(If "git foo" is not found in the git exec path, the wrapper
+(If "git foo" is not found in the Git exec path, the wrapper
will look in the rest of your $PATH for it. Thus, it's possible
-to write local git extensions that don't live in system space.)
+to write local Git extensions that don't live in system space.)
Implementation languages
------------------------
@@ -30,13 +30,13 @@ Perl.
While we strongly encourage coding in portable C for portability,
these specific scripting languages are also acceptable. We won't
accept more without a very strong technical case, as we don't want
-to broaden the git suite's required dependencies. Import utilities,
+to broaden the Git suite's required dependencies. Import utilities,
surgical tools, remote helpers and other code at the edges of the
-git suite are more lenient and we allow Python (and even Tcl/tk),
+Git suite are more lenient and we allow Python (and even Tcl/tk),
but they should not be used for core functions.
This may change in the future. Especially Python is not allowed in
-core because we need better Python integration in the git Windows
+core because we need better Python integration in the Git Windows
installer before we can be confident people in that environment
won't experience an unacceptably large loss of capability.
@@ -54,7 +54,7 @@ functions available to built-in commands written in C.
What every extension command needs
----------------------------------
-You must have a man page, written in asciidoc (this is what git help
+You must have a man page, written in asciidoc (this is what Git help
followed by your subcommand name will display). Be aware that there is
a local asciidoc configuration and macros which you should use. It's
often helpful to start by cloning an existing page and replacing the
@@ -74,7 +74,7 @@ Integrating a command
---------------------
Here are the things you need to do when you want to merge a new
-subcommand into the git tree.
+subcommand into the Git tree.
1. Don't forget to sign off your patch!
diff --git a/Documentation/howto/rebuild-from-update-hook.txt b/Documentation/howto/rebuild-from-update-hook.txt
index 00c1b45..25378f6 100644
--- a/Documentation/howto/rebuild-from-update-hook.txt
+++ b/Documentation/howto/rebuild-from-update-hook.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ Message-ID: <7vy86o6usx.fsf@assigned-by-dhcp.cox.net>
From: Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2005 18:19:10 -0700
Abstract: In this how-to article, JC talks about how he
- uses the post-update hook to automate git documentation page
+ uses the post-update hook to automate Git documentation page
shown at http://www.kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/.
Content-type: text/asciidoc
@@ -15,11 +15,11 @@ are built from Documentation/ directory of the git.git project
and needed to be kept up-to-date. The www.kernel.org/ servers
are mirrored and I was told that the origin of the mirror is on
the machine $some.kernel.org, on which I was given an account
-when I took over git maintainership from Linus.
+when I took over Git maintainership from Linus.
The directories relevant to this how-to are these two:
- /pub/scm/git/git.git/ The public git repository.
+ /pub/scm/git/git.git/ The public Git repository.
/pub/software/scm/git/docs/ The HTML documentation page.
So I made a repository to generate the documentation under my
@@ -46,7 +46,7 @@ script:
EOF
Initially I used to run this by hand whenever I push into the
-public git repository. Then I did a cron job that ran twice a
+public Git repository. Then I did a cron job that ran twice a
day. The current round uses the post-update hook mechanism,
like this:
diff --git a/Documentation/howto/recover-corrupted-blob-object.txt b/Documentation/howto/recover-corrupted-blob-object.txt
index 7484735..6d362ce 100644
--- a/Documentation/howto/recover-corrupted-blob-object.txt
+++ b/Documentation/howto/recover-corrupted-blob-object.txt
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ itself doesn't actually tell you anything, in order to fix a corrupt
object you basically have to find the "original source" for it.
The easiest way to do that is almost always to have backups, and find the
-same object somewhere else. Backups really are a good idea, and git makes
+same object somewhere else. Backups really are a good idea, and Git makes
it pretty easy (if nothing else, just clone the repository somewhere else,
and make sure that you do *not* use a hard-linked clone, and preferably
not the same disk/machine).
@@ -134,7 +134,7 @@ and your repository is good again!
git log --raw --all
and just looked for the sha of the missing object (4b9458b..) in that
-whole thing. It's up to you - git does *have* a lot of information, it is
+whole thing. It's up to you - Git does *have* a lot of information, it is
just missing one particular blob version.
Trying to recreate trees and especially commits is *much* harder. So you
diff --git a/Documentation/howto/revert-a-faulty-merge.txt b/Documentation/howto/revert-a-faulty-merge.txt
index 8a68548..075418e 100644
--- a/Documentation/howto/revert-a-faulty-merge.txt
+++ b/Documentation/howto/revert-a-faulty-merge.txt
@@ -164,7 +164,7 @@ merged. So it's debugging hell, because now you don't have lots of small
changes that you can try to pinpoint which _part_ of it changes.
But does it all work? Sure it does. You can revert a merge, and from a
-purely technical angle, git did it very naturally and had no real
+purely technical angle, Git did it very naturally and had no real
troubles. It just considered it a change from "state before merge" to
"state after merge", and that was it. Nothing complicated, nothing odd,
nothing really dangerous. Git will do it without even thinking about it.
diff --git a/Documentation/howto/setup-git-server-over-http.txt b/Documentation/howto/setup-git-server-over-http.txt
index e49d785..7f4943e 100644
--- a/Documentation/howto/setup-git-server-over-http.txt
+++ b/Documentation/howto/setup-git-server-over-http.txt
@@ -1,9 +1,9 @@
From: Rutger Nijlunsing <rutger@nospam.com>
-Subject: Setting up a git repository which can be pushed into and pulled from over HTTP(S).
+Subject: Setting up a Git repository which can be pushed into and pulled from over HTTP(S).
Date: Thu, 10 Aug 2006 22:00:26 +0200
Content-type: text/asciidoc
-How to setup git server over http
+How to setup Git server over http
=================================
Since Apache is one of those packages people like to compile
@@ -44,9 +44,9 @@ What's needed:
- have permissions to chown a directory
-- have git installed on the client, and
+- have Git installed on the client, and
-- either have git installed on the server or have a webdav client on
+- either have Git installed on the server or have a webdav client on
the client.
In effect, this means you're going to be root, or that you're using a
@@ -57,7 +57,7 @@ Step 1: setup a bare Git repository
-----------------------------------
At the time of writing, git-http-push cannot remotely create a Git
-repository. So we have to do that at the server side with git. Another
+repository. So we have to do that at the server side with Git. Another
option is to generate an empty bare repository at the client and copy
it to the server with a WebDAV client (which is the only option if Git
is not installed on the server).
@@ -189,7 +189,7 @@ http://<servername>/my-new-repo.git [x] Open as webfolder -> login .
Step 3: setup the client
------------------------
-Make sure that you have HTTP support, i.e. your git was built with
+Make sure that you have HTTP support, i.e. your Git was built with
libcurl (version more recent than 7.10). The command 'git http-push' with
no argument should display a usage message.
@@ -268,7 +268,7 @@ Reading /usr/local/apache2/logs/error_log is often helpful.
On Debian: Read /var/log/apache2/error.log instead.
-If you access HTTPS locations, git may fail verifying the SSL
+If you access HTTPS locations, Git may fail verifying the SSL
certificate (this is return code 60). Setting http.sslVerify=false can
help diagnosing the problem, but removes security checks.
diff --git a/Documentation/howto/use-git-daemon.txt b/Documentation/howto/use-git-daemon.txt
index 23cdf35..7af2e52 100644
--- a/Documentation/howto/use-git-daemon.txt
+++ b/Documentation/howto/use-git-daemon.txt
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@ How to use git-daemon
=====================
Git can be run in inetd mode and in stand alone mode. But all you want is
-let a coworker pull from you, and therefore need to set up a git server
+let a coworker pull from you, and therefore need to set up a Git server
real quick, right?
Note that git-daemon is not really chatty at the moment, especially when
diff --git a/Documentation/howto/using-signed-tag-in-pull-request.txt b/Documentation/howto/using-signed-tag-in-pull-request.txt
index 00f693b..bbf040e 100644
--- a/Documentation/howto/using-signed-tag-in-pull-request.txt
+++ b/Documentation/howto/using-signed-tag-in-pull-request.txt
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ Earlier, a typical pull request may have started like this:
Froboz 3.2 (2011-09-30 14:20:57 -0700)
- are available in the git repository at:
+ are available in the Git repository at:
example.com:/git/froboz.git for-xyzzy
------------
@@ -107,7 +107,7 @@ The resulting msg.txt file begins like so:
Froboz 3.2 (2011-09-30 14:20:57 -0700)
- are available in the git repository at:
+ are available in the Git repository at:
example.com:/git/froboz.git tags/frotz-for-xyzzy
diff --git a/Documentation/i18n.txt b/Documentation/i18n.txt
index 625d315..e9a1d5d 100644
--- a/Documentation/i18n.txt
+++ b/Documentation/i18n.txt
@@ -1,9 +1,9 @@
-At the core level, git is character encoding agnostic.
+At the core level, Git is character encoding agnostic.
- The pathnames recorded in the index and in the tree objects
are treated as uninterpreted sequences of non-NUL bytes.
What readdir(2) returns are what are recorded and compared
- with the data git keeps track of, which in turn are expected
+ with the data Git keeps track of, which in turn are expected
to be what lstat(2) and creat(2) accepts. There is no such
thing as pathname encoding translation.
@@ -15,9 +15,9 @@ At the core level, git is character encoding agnostic.
bytes.
Although we encourage that the commit log messages are encoded
-in UTF-8, both the core and git Porcelain are designed not to
+in UTF-8, both the core and Git Porcelain are designed not to
force UTF-8 on projects. If all participants of a particular
-project find it more convenient to use legacy encodings, git
+project find it more convenient to use legacy encodings, Git
does not forbid it. However, there are a few things to keep in
mind.
diff --git a/Documentation/merge-config.txt b/Documentation/merge-config.txt
index 9bb4956..897329b 100644
--- a/Documentation/merge-config.txt
+++ b/Documentation/merge-config.txt
@@ -17,10 +17,10 @@ merge.defaultToUpstream::
these tracking branches are merged.
merge.ff::
- By default, git does not create an extra merge commit when merging
+ By default, Git does not create an extra merge commit when merging
a commit that is a descendant of the current commit. Instead, the
tip of the current branch is fast-forwarded. When set to `false`,
- this variable tells git to create an extra merge commit in such
+ this variable tells Git to create an extra merge commit in such
a case (equivalent to giving the `--no-ff` option from the command
line). When set to `only`, only such fast-forward merges are
allowed (equivalent to giving the `--ff-only` option from the
@@ -38,10 +38,10 @@ merge.renameLimit::
diff.renameLimit.
merge.renormalize::
- Tell git that canonical representation of files in the
+ Tell Git that canonical representation of files in the
repository has changed over time (e.g. earlier commits record
text files with CRLF line endings, but recent ones use LF line
- endings). In such a repository, git can convert the data
+ endings). In such a repository, Git can convert the data
recorded in commits to a canonical form before performing a
merge to reduce unnecessary conflicts. For more information,
see section "Merging branches with differing checkin/checkout
diff --git a/Documentation/rev-list-options.txt b/Documentation/rev-list-options.txt
index 1ec14a0..3bdbf5e 100644
--- a/Documentation/rev-list-options.txt
+++ b/Documentation/rev-list-options.txt
@@ -649,7 +649,7 @@ together.
Object Traversal
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-These options are mostly targeted for packing of git repositories.
+These options are mostly targeted for packing of Git repositories.
--objects::
@@ -717,7 +717,7 @@ format, often found in E-mail messages.
+
`--date=short` shows only date but not time, in `YYYY-MM-DD` format.
+
-`--date=raw` shows the date in the internal raw git format `%s %z` format.
+`--date=raw` shows the date in the internal raw Git format `%s %z` format.
+
`--date=default` shows timestamps in the original timezone
(either committer's or author's).
diff --git a/Documentation/revisions.txt b/Documentation/revisions.txt
index 991fcd8..678d175 100644
--- a/Documentation/revisions.txt
+++ b/Documentation/revisions.txt
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ blobs contained in a commit.
A symbolic ref name. E.g. 'master' typically means the commit
object referenced by 'refs/heads/master'. If you
happen to have both 'heads/master' and 'tags/master', you can
- explicitly say 'heads/master' to tell git which one you mean.
+ explicitly say 'heads/master' to tell Git which one you mean.
When ambiguous, a '<refname>' is disambiguated by taking the
first match in the following rules:
diff --git a/Documentation/technical/api-builtin.txt b/Documentation/technical/api-builtin.txt
index b0cafe8..4a4228b 100644
--- a/Documentation/technical/api-builtin.txt
+++ b/Documentation/technical/api-builtin.txt
@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ Adding a new built-in
---------------------
There are 4 things to do to add a built-in command implementation to
-git:
+Git:
. Define the implementation of the built-in command `foo` with
signature:
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ where options is the bitwise-or of:
`RUN_SETUP`::
- Make sure there is a git directory to work on, and if there is a
+ Make sure there is a Git directory to work on, and if there is a
work tree, chdir to the top of it if the command was invoked
in a subdirectory. If there is no work tree, no chdir() is
done.
diff --git a/Documentation/technical/api-config.txt b/Documentation/technical/api-config.txt
index edf8dfb..230b3a0 100644
--- a/Documentation/technical/api-config.txt
+++ b/Documentation/technical/api-config.txt
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
config API
==========
-The config API gives callers a way to access git configuration files
+The config API gives callers a way to access Git configuration files
(and files which have the same syntax). See linkgit:git-config[1] for a
discussion of the config file syntax.
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ Config files are parsed linearly, and each variable found is passed to a
caller-provided callback function. The callback function is responsible
for any actions to be taken on the config option, and is free to ignore
some options. It is not uncommon for the configuration to be parsed
-several times during the run of a git program, with different callbacks
+several times during the run of a Git program, with different callbacks
picking out different variables useful to themselves.
A config callback function takes three parameters:
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ Basic Config Querying
---------------------
Most programs will simply want to look up variables in all config files
-that git knows about, using the normal precedence rules. To do this,
+that Git knows about, using the normal precedence rules. To do this,
call `git_config` with a callback function and void data pointer.
`git_config` will read all config sources in order of increasing
@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@ value is left at the end).
The `git_config_with_options` function lets the caller examine config
while adjusting some of the default behavior of `git_config`. It should
-almost never be used by "regular" git code that is looking up
+almost never be used by "regular" Git code that is looking up
configuration variables. It is intended for advanced callers like
`git-config`, which are intentionally tweaking the normal config-lookup
process. It takes two extra parameters:
@@ -66,7 +66,7 @@ Regular `git_config` defaults to `1`.
There is a special version of `git_config` called `git_config_early`.
This version takes an additional parameter to specify the repository
config, instead of having it looked up via `git_path`. This is useful
-early in a git program before the repository has been found. Unless
+early in a Git program before the repository has been found. Unless
you're working with early setup code, you probably don't want to use
this.
diff --git a/Documentation/technical/api-credentials.txt b/Documentation/technical/api-credentials.txt
index 5977b58..516fda7 100644
--- a/Documentation/technical/api-credentials.txt
+++ b/Documentation/technical/api-credentials.txt
@@ -7,9 +7,9 @@ world can take many forms, in this document the word "credential" always
refers to a username and password pair).
This document describes two interfaces: the C API that the credential
-subsystem provides to the rest of git, and the protocol that git uses to
+subsystem provides to the rest of Git, and the protocol that Git uses to
communicate with system-specific "credential helpers". If you are
-writing git code that wants to look up or prompt for credentials, see
+writing Git code that wants to look up or prompt for credentials, see
the section "C API" below. If you want to write your own helper, see
the section on "Credential Helpers" below.
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@ Typical setup
------------
+-----------------------+
-| git code (C) |--- to server requiring --->
+| Git code (C) |--- to server requiring --->
| | authentication
|.......................|
| C credential API |--- prompt ---> User
@@ -27,11 +27,11 @@ Typical setup
| pipe |
| v
+-----------------------+
-| git credential helper |
+| Git credential helper |
+-----------------------+
------------
-The git code (typically a remote-helper) will call the C API to obtain
+The Git code (typically a remote-helper) will call the C API to obtain
credential data like a login/password pair (credential_fill). The
API will itself call a remote helper (e.g. "git credential-cache" or
"git credential-store") that may retrieve credential data from a
@@ -42,7 +42,7 @@ contacting the server, and does the actual authentication.
C API
-----
-The credential C API is meant to be called by git code which needs to
+The credential C API is meant to be called by Git code which needs to
acquire or store a credential. It is centered around an object
representing a single credential and provides three basic operations:
fill (acquire credentials by calling helpers and/or prompting the user),
@@ -177,14 +177,14 @@ int foo_login(struct foo_connection *f)
Credential Helpers
------------------
-Credential helpers are programs executed by git to fetch or save
+Credential helpers are programs executed by Git to fetch or save
credentials from and to long-term storage (where "long-term" is simply
-longer than a single git process; e.g., credentials may be stored
+longer than a single Git process; e.g., credentials may be stored
in-memory for a few minutes, or indefinitely on disk).
Each helper is specified by a single string in the configuration
variable `credential.helper` (and others, see linkgit:git-config[1]).
-The string is transformed by git into a command to be executed using
+The string is transformed by Git into a command to be executed using
these rules:
1. If the helper string begins with "!", it is considered a shell
@@ -248,7 +248,7 @@ FORMAT` in linkgit:git-credential[7] for a detailed specification).
For a `get` operation, the helper should produce a list of attributes
on stdout in the same format. A helper is free to produce a subset, or
even no values at all if it has nothing useful to provide. Any provided
-attributes will overwrite those already known about by git.
+attributes will overwrite those already known about by Git.
For a `store` or `erase` operation, the helper's output is ignored.
If it fails to perform the requested operation, it may complain to
diff --git a/Documentation/technical/api-directory-listing.txt b/Documentation/technical/api-directory-listing.txt
index 944fc39..fa2c5d5 100644
--- a/Documentation/technical/api-directory-listing.txt
+++ b/Documentation/technical/api-directory-listing.txt
@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ The notable options are:
`DIR_NO_GITLINKS`:::
- If set, recurse into a directory that looks like a git
+ If set, recurse into a directory that looks like a Git
directory. Otherwise it is shown as a directory.
The result of the enumeration is left in these fields:
diff --git a/Documentation/technical/api-parse-options.txt b/Documentation/technical/api-parse-options.txt
index 3062389..32ddc1c 100644
--- a/Documentation/technical/api-parse-options.txt
+++ b/Documentation/technical/api-parse-options.txt
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
parse-options API
=================
-The parse-options API is used to parse and massage options in git
+The parse-options API is used to parse and massage options in Git
and to provide a usage help with consistent look.
Basics
diff --git a/Documentation/technical/api-remote.txt b/Documentation/technical/api-remote.txt
index c54b17d..4be8776 100644
--- a/Documentation/technical/api-remote.txt
+++ b/Documentation/technical/api-remote.txt
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ Remotes configuration API
The API in remote.h gives access to the configuration related to
remotes. It handles all three configuration mechanisms historically
-and currently used by git, and presents the information in a uniform
+and currently used by Git, and presents the information in a uniform
fashion. Note that the code also handles plain URLs without any
configuration, giving them just the default information.
@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ struct remote
`receivepack`, `uploadpack`::
The configured helper programs to run on the remote side, for
- git-native protocols.
+ Git-native protocols.
`http_proxy`::
diff --git a/Documentation/technical/index-format.txt b/Documentation/technical/index-format.txt
index 6a05ee2..27c716b 100644
--- a/Documentation/technical/index-format.txt
+++ b/Documentation/technical/index-format.txt
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
Git index format
================
-== The git index file has the following format
+== The Git index file has the following format
All binary numbers are in network byte order. Version 2 is described
here unless stated otherwise.
diff --git a/Documentation/technical/pack-heuristics.txt b/Documentation/technical/pack-heuristics.txt
index 103eb5d..dbdf7ba 100644
--- a/Documentation/technical/pack-heuristics.txt
+++ b/Documentation/technical/pack-heuristics.txt
@@ -5,11 +5,11 @@
Where do I go
to learn the details
- of git's packing heuristics?
+ of Git's packing heuristics?
Be careful what you ask!
-Followers of the git, please open the git IRC Log and turn to
+Followers of the Git, please open the Git IRC Log and turn to
February 10, 2006.
It's a rare occasion, and we are joined by the King Git Himself,
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ and seeks enlightenment. Others are present, but silent.
Let's listen in!
<njs`> Oh, here's a really stupid question -- where do I go to
- learn the details of git's packing heuristics? google avails
+ learn the details of Git's packing heuristics? google avails
me not, reading the source didn't help a lot, and wading
through the whole mailing list seems less efficient than any
of that.
@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@ Ah! Modesty after all.
<linus> njs, I don't think the docs exist. That's something where
I don't think anybody else than me even really got involved.
- Most of the rest of git others have been busy with (especially
+ Most of the rest of Git others have been busy with (especially
Junio), but packing nobody touched after I did it.
It's cryptic, yet vague. Linus in style for sure. Wise men
@@ -57,7 +57,7 @@ Bait...
And switch. That ought to do it!
- <linus> Remember: git really doesn't follow files. So what it does is
+ <linus> Remember: Git really doesn't follow files. So what it does is
- generate a list of all objects
- sort the list according to magic heuristics
- walk the list, using a sliding window, seeing if an object
@@ -382,7 +382,7 @@ The 'net never forgets, so that should be good until the end of time.
<njs`> (if only it happened more...)
<linus> Anyway, the pack-file could easily be denser still, but
- because it's used both for streaming (the git protocol) and
+ because it's used both for streaming (the Git protocol) and
for on-disk, it has a few pessimizations.
Actually, it is a made-up word. But it is a made-up word being
@@ -432,12 +432,12 @@ Gasp! OK, saved. That's a fair Engineering trade off. Close call!
In fact, Linus reflects on some Basic Engineering Fundamentals,
design options, etc.
- <linus> More importantly, they allow git to still _conceptually_
+ <linus> More importantly, they allow Git to still _conceptually_
never deal with deltas at all, and be a "whole object" store.
Which has some problems (we discussed bad huge-file
- behaviour on the git lists the other day), but it does mean
- that the basic git concepts are really really simple and
+ behaviour on the Git lists the other day), but it does mean
+ that the basic Git concepts are really really simple and
straightforward.
It's all been quite stable.
@@ -461,6 +461,6 @@ Nuff said.
<njs`> :-)
<njs`> appreciate the infodump, I really was failing to find the
- details on git packs :-)
+ details on Git packs :-)
And now you know the rest of the story.
diff --git a/Documentation/technical/racy-git.txt b/Documentation/technical/racy-git.txt
index 53aa0c8..6dc82ca 100644
--- a/Documentation/technical/racy-git.txt
+++ b/Documentation/technical/racy-git.txt
@@ -1,21 +1,21 @@
-Use of index and Racy git problem
+Use of index and Racy Git problem
=================================
Background
----------
-The index is one of the most important data structures in git.
+The index is one of the most important data structures in Git.
It represents a virtual working tree state by recording list of
paths and their object names and serves as a staging area to
write out the next tree object to be committed. The state is
"virtual" in the sense that it does not necessarily have to, and
often does not, match the files in the working tree.
-There are cases git needs to examine the differences between the
+There are cases Git needs to examine the differences between the
virtual working tree state in the index and the files in the
working tree. The most obvious case is when the user asks `git
diff` (or its low level implementation, `git diff-files`) or
-`git-ls-files --modified`. In addition, git internally checks
+`git-ls-files --modified`. In addition, Git internally checks
if the files in the working tree are different from what are
recorded in the index to avoid stomping on local changes in them
during patch application, switching branches, and merging.
@@ -24,16 +24,16 @@ In order to speed up this comparison between the files in the
working tree and the index entries, the index entries record the
information obtained from the filesystem via `lstat(2)` system
call when they were last updated. When checking if they differ,
-git first runs `lstat(2)` on the files and compares the result
+Git first runs `lstat(2)` on the files and compares the result
with this information (this is what was originally done by the
`ce_match_stat()` function, but the current code does it in
`ce_match_stat_basic()` function). If some of these "cached
-stat information" fields do not match, git can tell that the
+stat information" fields do not match, Git can tell that the
files are modified without even looking at their contents.
Note: not all members in `struct stat` obtained via `lstat(2)`
are used for this comparison. For example, `st_atime` obviously
-is not useful. Currently, git compares the file type (regular
+is not useful. Currently, Git compares the file type (regular
files vs symbolic links) and executable bits (only for regular
files) from `st_mode` member, `st_mtime` and `st_ctime`
timestamps, `st_uid`, `st_gid`, `st_ino`, and `st_size` members.
@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@ of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/tglx/history.git
([PATCH] Sync in core time granuality with filesystems,
2005-01-04).
-Racy git
+Racy Git
--------
There is one slight problem with the optimization based on the
@@ -67,13 +67,13 @@ timestamp does not change, after this sequence, the cached stat
information the index entry records still exactly match what you
would see in the filesystem, even though the file `foo` is now
different.
-This way, git can incorrectly think files in the working tree
+This way, Git can incorrectly think files in the working tree
are unmodified even though they actually are. This is called
-the "racy git" problem (discovered by Pasky), and the entries
+the "racy Git" problem (discovered by Pasky), and the entries
that appear clean when they may not be because of this problem
are called "racily clean".
-To avoid this problem, git does two things:
+To avoid this problem, Git does two things:
. When the cached stat information says the file has not been
modified, and the `st_mtime` is the same as (or newer than)
@@ -116,7 +116,7 @@ timestamp comparison check done with the former logic anymore.
The latter makes sure that the cached stat information for `foo`
would never match with the file in the working tree, so later
checks by `ce_match_stat_basic()` would report that the index entry
-does not match the file and git does not have to fall back on more
+does not match the file and Git does not have to fall back on more
expensive `ce_modified_check_fs()`.
@@ -159,7 +159,7 @@ of the cached stat information.
Avoiding runtime penalty
------------------------
-In order to avoid the above runtime penalty, post 1.4.2 git used
+In order to avoid the above runtime penalty, post 1.4.2 Git used
to have a code that made sure the index file
got timestamp newer than the youngest files in the index when
there are many young files with the same timestamp as the
diff --git a/Documentation/urls-remotes.txt b/Documentation/urls-remotes.txt
index 00f7e79..282758e 100644
--- a/Documentation/urls-remotes.txt
+++ b/Documentation/urls-remotes.txt
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@ REMOTES[[REMOTES]]
The name of one of the following can be used instead
of a URL as `<repository>` argument:
-* a remote in the git configuration file: `$GIT_DIR/config`,
+* a remote in the Git configuration file: `$GIT_DIR/config`,
* a file in the `$GIT_DIR/remotes` directory, or
* a file in the `$GIT_DIR/branches` directory.
diff --git a/Documentation/urls.txt b/Documentation/urls.txt
index 1d15ee7..539c0a0 100644
--- a/Documentation/urls.txt
+++ b/Documentation/urls.txt
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ The ssh and git protocols additionally support ~username expansion:
- git://host.xz{startsb}:port{endsb}/~{startsb}user{endsb}/path/to/repo.git/
- {startsb}user@{endsb}host.xz:/~{startsb}user{endsb}/path/to/repo.git/
-For local repositories, also supported by git natively, the following
+For local repositories, also supported by Git natively, the following
syntaxes may be used:
- /path/to/repo.git/
@@ -46,7 +46,7 @@ These two syntaxes are mostly equivalent, except the former implies
--local option.
endif::git-clone[]
-When git doesn't know how to handle a certain transport protocol, it
+When Git doesn't know how to handle a certain transport protocol, it
attempts to use the 'remote-<transport>' remote helper, if one
exists. To explicitly request a remote helper, the following syntax
may be used:
diff --git a/Documentation/user-manual.txt b/Documentation/user-manual.txt
index c93e1a8..5077e7c 100644
--- a/Documentation/user-manual.txt
+++ b/Documentation/user-manual.txt
@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ ______________________________________________
Git is a fast distributed revision control system.
This manual is designed to be readable by someone with basic UNIX
-command-line skills, but no previous knowledge of git.
+command-line skills, but no previous knowledge of Git.
<<repositories-and-branches>> and <<exploring-git-history>> explain how
to fetch and study a project using git--read these chapters to learn how
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ $ git help clone
With the latter, you can use the manual viewer of your choice; see
linkgit:git-help[1] for more information.
-See also <<git-quick-start>> for a brief overview of git commands,
+See also <<git-quick-start>> for a brief overview of Git commands,
without any explanation.
Finally, see <<todo>> for ways that you can help make this manual more
@@ -46,10 +46,10 @@ Repositories and Branches
=========================
[[how-to-get-a-git-repository]]
-How to get a git repository
+How to get a Git repository
---------------------------
-It will be useful to have a git repository to experiment with as you
+It will be useful to have a Git repository to experiment with as you
read this manual.
The best way to get one is by using the linkgit:git-clone[1] command to
@@ -57,7 +57,7 @@ download a copy of an existing repository. If you don't already have a
project in mind, here are some interesting examples:
------------------------------------------------
- # git itself (approx. 10MB download):
+ # Git itself (approx. 10MB download):
$ git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/git/git.git
# the Linux kernel (approx. 150MB download):
$ git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux-2.6.git
@@ -79,7 +79,7 @@ How to check out a different version of a project
Git is best thought of as a tool for storing the history of a collection
of files. It stores the history as a compressed collection of
-interrelated snapshots of the project's contents. In git each such
+interrelated snapshots of the project's contents. In Git each such
version is called a <<def_commit,commit>>.
Those snapshots aren't necessarily all arranged in a single line from
@@ -87,7 +87,7 @@ oldest to newest; instead, work may simultaneously proceed along
parallel lines of development, called <<def_branch,branches>>, which may
merge and diverge.
-A single git repository can track development on multiple branches. It
+A single Git repository can track development on multiple branches. It
does this by keeping a list of <<def_head,heads>> which reference the
latest commit on each branch; the linkgit:git-branch[1] command shows
you the list of branch heads:
@@ -198,7 +198,7 @@ has that commit at all). Since the object name is computed as a hash over the
contents of the commit, you are guaranteed that the commit can never change
without its name also changing.
-In fact, in <<git-concepts>> we shall see that everything stored in git
+In fact, in <<git-concepts>> we shall see that everything stored in Git
history, including file data and directory contents, is stored in an object
with a name that is a hash of its contents.
@@ -211,7 +211,7 @@ parent commit which shows what happened before this commit.
Following the chain of parents will eventually take you back to the
beginning of the project.
-However, the commits do not form a simple list; git allows lines of
+However, the commits do not form a simple list; Git allows lines of
development to diverge and then reconverge, and the point where two
lines of development reconverge is called a "merge". The commit
representing a merge can therefore have more than one parent, with
@@ -219,8 +219,8 @@ each parent representing the most recent commit on one of the lines
of development leading to that point.
The best way to see how this works is using the linkgit:gitk[1]
-command; running gitk now on a git repository and looking for merge
-commits will help understand how the git organizes history.
+command; running gitk now on a Git repository and looking for merge
+commits will help understand how the Git organizes history.
In the following, we say that commit X is "reachable" from commit Y
if commit X is an ancestor of commit Y. Equivalently, you could say
@@ -231,7 +231,7 @@ leading from commit Y to commit X.
Understanding history: History diagrams
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-We will sometimes represent git history using diagrams like the one
+We will sometimes represent Git history using diagrams like the one
below. Commits are shown as "o", and the links between them with
lines drawn with - / and \. Time goes left to right:
@@ -285,7 +285,7 @@ git branch -D <branch>::
even if the branch points to a commit not reachable
from the current branch, you may know that that commit
is still reachable from some other branch or tag. In that
- case it is safe to use this command to force git to delete
+ case it is safe to use this command to force Git to delete
the branch.
git checkout <branch>::
make the current branch <branch>, updating the working
@@ -295,7 +295,7 @@ git checkout -b <new> <start-point>::
check it out.
The special symbol "HEAD" can always be used to refer to the current
-branch. In fact, git uses a file named "HEAD" in the .git directory to
+branch. In fact, Git uses a file named "HEAD" in the .git directory to
remember which branch is current:
------------------------------------------------
@@ -377,7 +377,7 @@ $ git checkout -b my-todo-copy origin/todo
You can also check out "origin/todo" directly to examine it or
write a one-off patch. See <<detached-head,detached head>>.
-Note that the name "origin" is just the name that git uses by default
+Note that the name "origin" is just the name that Git uses by default
to refer to the repository that you cloned from.
[[how-git-stores-references]]
@@ -405,7 +405,7 @@ As another useful shortcut, the "HEAD" of a repository can be referred
to just using the name of that repository. So, for example, "origin"
is usually a shortcut for the HEAD branch in the repository "origin".
-For the complete list of paths which git checks for references, and
+For the complete list of paths which Git checks for references, and
the order it uses to decide which to choose when there are multiple
references with the same shorthand name, see the "SPECIFYING
REVISIONS" section of linkgit:gitrevisions[7].
@@ -449,7 +449,7 @@ origin/master
If you run "git fetch <remote>" later, the remote-tracking branches for the
named <remote> will be updated.
-If you examine the file .git/config, you will see that git has added
+If you examine the file .git/config, you will see that Git has added
a new stanza:
-------------------------------------------------
@@ -461,13 +461,13 @@ $ cat .git/config
...
-------------------------------------------------
-This is what causes git to track the remote's branches; you may modify
+This is what causes Git to track the remote's branches; you may modify
or delete these configuration options by editing .git/config with a
text editor. (See the "CONFIGURATION FILE" section of
linkgit:git-config[1] for details.)
[[exploring-git-history]]
-Exploring git history
+Exploring Git history
=====================
Git is best thought of as a tool for storing the history of a
@@ -499,7 +499,7 @@ Bisecting: 3537 revisions left to test after this
[65934a9a028b88e83e2b0f8b36618fe503349f8e] BLOCK: Make USB storage depend on SCSI rather than selecting it [try #6]
-------------------------------------------------
-If you run "git branch" at this point, you'll see that git has
+If you run "git branch" at this point, you'll see that Git has
temporarily moved you in "(no branch)". HEAD is now detached from any
branch and points directly to a commit (with commit id 65934...) that
is reachable from "master" but not from v2.6.18. Compile and test it,
@@ -511,7 +511,7 @@ Bisecting: 1769 revisions left to test after this
[7eff82c8b1511017ae605f0c99ac275a7e21b867] i2c-core: Drop useless bitmaskings
-------------------------------------------------
-checks out an older version. Continue like this, telling git at each
+checks out an older version. Continue like this, telling Git at each
stage whether the version it gives you is good or bad, and notice
that the number of revisions left to test is cut approximately in
half each time.
@@ -549,14 +549,14 @@ then test, run "bisect good" or "bisect bad" as appropriate, and
continue.
Instead of "git bisect visualize" and then "git reset --hard
-fb47ddb2db...", you might just want to tell git that you want to skip
+fb47ddb2db...", you might just want to tell Git that you want to skip
the current commit:
-------------------------------------------------
$ git bisect skip
-------------------------------------------------
-In this case, though, git may not eventually be able to tell the first
+In this case, though, Git may not eventually be able to tell the first
bad one between some first skipped commits and a later bad commit.
There are also ways to automate the bisecting process if you have a
@@ -685,7 +685,7 @@ See the "--pretty" option in the linkgit:git-log[1] man page for more
display options.
Note that git log starts with the most recent commit and works
-backwards through the parents; however, since git history can contain
+backwards through the parents; however, since Git history can contain
multiple independent lines of development, the particular order that
commits are listed in may be somewhat arbitrary.
@@ -732,7 +732,7 @@ $ git show v2.5:fs/locks.c
-------------------------------------------------
Before the colon may be anything that names a commit, and after it
-may be any path to a file tracked by git.
+may be any path to a file tracked by Git.
[[history-examples]]
Examples
@@ -984,14 +984,14 @@ student. The linkgit:git-log[1], linkgit:git-diff-tree[1], and
linkgit:git-hash-object[1] man pages may prove helpful.
[[Developing-With-git]]
-Developing with git
+Developing with Git
===================
[[telling-git-your-name]]
-Telling git your name
+Telling Git your name
---------------------
-Before creating any commits, you should introduce yourself to git. The
+Before creating any commits, you should introduce yourself to Git. The
easiest way to do so is to make sure the following lines appear in a
file named .gitconfig in your home directory:
@@ -1035,13 +1035,13 @@ Creating a new commit takes three steps:
1. Making some changes to the working directory using your
favorite editor.
- 2. Telling git about your changes.
- 3. Creating the commit using the content you told git about
+ 2. Telling Git about your changes.
+ 3. Creating the commit using the content you told Git about
in step 2.
In practice, you can interleave and repeat steps 1 and 2 as many
times as you want: in order to keep track of what you want committed
-at step 3, git maintains a snapshot of the tree's contents in a
+at step 3, Git maintains a snapshot of the tree's contents in a
special staging area called "the index."
At the beginning, the content of the index will be identical to
@@ -1094,7 +1094,7 @@ When you're ready, just run
$ git commit
-------------------------------------------------
-and git will prompt you for a commit message and then create the new
+and Git will prompt you for a commit message and then create the new
commit. Check to make sure it looks like what you expected with
-------------------------------------------------
@@ -1138,7 +1138,7 @@ with a single short (less than 50 character) line summarizing the
change, followed by a blank line and then a more thorough
description. The text up to the first blank line in a commit
message is treated as the commit title, and that title is used
-throughout git. For example, linkgit:git-format-patch[1] turns a
+throughout Git. For example, linkgit:git-format-patch[1] turns a
commit into email, and it uses the title on the Subject line and the
rest of the commit in the body.
@@ -1147,15 +1147,15 @@ rest of the commit in the body.
Ignoring files
--------------
-A project will often generate files that you do 'not' want to track with git.
+A project will often generate files that you do 'not' want to track with Git.
This typically includes files generated by a build process or temporary
-backup files made by your editor. Of course, 'not' tracking files with git
+backup files made by your editor. Of course, 'not' tracking files with Git
is just a matter of 'not' calling `git add` on them. But it quickly becomes
annoying to have these untracked files lying around; e.g. they make
`git add .` practically useless, and they keep showing up in the output of
`git status`.
-You can tell git to ignore certain files by creating a file called .gitignore
+You can tell Git to ignore certain files by creating a file called .gitignore
in the top level of your working directory, with contents such as:
-------------------------------------------------
@@ -1181,7 +1181,7 @@ for other users who clone your repository.
If you wish the exclude patterns to affect only certain repositories
(instead of every repository for a given project), you may instead put
them in a file in your repository named .git/info/exclude, or in any file
-specified by the `core.excludesfile` configuration variable. Some git
+specified by the `core.excludesfile` configuration variable. Some Git
commands can also take exclude patterns directly on the command line.
See linkgit:gitignore[5] for the details.
@@ -1227,7 +1227,7 @@ Automatic merge failed; fix conflicts and then commit the result.
Conflict markers are left in the problematic files, and after
you resolve the conflicts manually, you can update the index
-with the contents and run git commit, as you normally would when
+with the contents and run Git commit, as you normally would when
creating a new file.
If you examine the resulting commit using gitk, you will see that it
@@ -1238,7 +1238,7 @@ one to the top of the other branch.
Resolving a merge
-----------------
-When a merge isn't resolved automatically, git leaves the index and
+When a merge isn't resolved automatically, Git leaves the index and
the working tree in a special state that gives you all the
information you need to help resolve the merge.
@@ -1274,14 +1274,14 @@ some information about the merge. Normally you can just use this
default message unchanged, but you may add additional commentary of
your own if desired.
-The above is all you need to know to resolve a simple merge. But git
+The above is all you need to know to resolve a simple merge. But Git
also provides more information to help resolve conflicts:
[[conflict-resolution]]
Getting conflict-resolution help during a merge
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-All of the changes that git was able to merge automatically are
+All of the changes that Git was able to merge automatically are
already added to the index file, so linkgit:git-diff[1] shows only
the conflicts. It uses an unusual syntax:
@@ -1413,7 +1413,7 @@ parents, one pointing at each of the two lines of development that
were merged.
However, if the current branch is a descendant of the other--so every
-commit present in the one is already contained in the other--then git
+commit present in the one is already contained in the other--then Git
just performs a "fast-forward"; the head of the current branch is moved
forward to point at the head of the merged-in branch, without any new
commits being created.
@@ -1439,7 +1439,7 @@ fundamentally different ways to fix the problem:
2. You can go back and modify the old commit. You should
never do this if you have already made the history public;
- git does not normally expect the "history" of a project to
+ Git does not normally expect the "history" of a project to
change, and cannot correctly perform repeated merges from
a branch that has had its history changed.
@@ -1464,7 +1464,7 @@ You can also revert an earlier change, for example, the next-to-last:
$ git revert HEAD^
-------------------------------------------------
-In this case git will attempt to undo the old change while leaving
+In this case Git will attempt to undo the old change while leaving
intact any changes made since then. If more recent changes overlap
with the changes to be reverted, then you will be asked to fix
conflicts manually, just as in the case of <<resolving-a-merge,
@@ -1561,7 +1561,7 @@ $ git stash pop
Ensuring good performance
-------------------------
-On large repositories, git depends on compression to keep the history
+On large repositories, Git depends on compression to keep the history
information from taking up too much space on disk or in memory.
This compression is not performed automatically. Therefore you
@@ -1618,7 +1618,7 @@ Say you modify a branch with +linkgit:git-reset[1] \--hard+, and then
realize that the branch was the only reference you had to that point in
history.
-Fortunately, git also keeps a log, called a "reflog", of all the
+Fortunately, Git also keeps a log, called a "reflog", of all the
previous values of each branch. So in this case you can still find the
old history using, for example,
@@ -1627,7 +1627,7 @@ $ git log master@{1}
-------------------------------------------------
This lists the commits reachable from the previous version of the
-"master" branch head. This syntax can be used with any git command
+"master" branch head. This syntax can be used with any Git command
that accepts a commit, not just with git log. Some other examples:
-------------------------------------------------
@@ -1653,7 +1653,7 @@ pruned. See linkgit:git-reflog[1] and linkgit:git-gc[1] to learn
how to control this pruning, and see the "SPECIFYING REVISIONS"
section of linkgit:gitrevisions[7] for details.
-Note that the reflog history is very different from normal git history.
+Note that the reflog history is very different from normal Git history.
While normal history is shared by every repository that works on the
same project, the reflog history is not shared: it tells you only about
how the branches in your local repository have changed over time.
@@ -1816,7 +1816,7 @@ $ git am -3 patches.mbox
Git will apply each patch in order; if any conflicts are found, it
will stop, and you can fix the conflicts as described in
"<<resolving-a-merge,Resolving a merge>>". (The "-3" option tells
-git to perform a merge; if you would prefer it just to abort and
+Git to perform a merge; if you would prefer it just to abort and
leave your tree and index untouched, you may omit that option.)
Once the index is updated with the results of the conflict
@@ -1826,7 +1826,7 @@ resolution, instead of creating a new commit, just run
$ git am --resolved
-------------------------------------------------
-and git will create the commit for you and continue applying the
+and Git will create the commit for you and continue applying the
remaining patches from the mailbox.
The final result will be a series of commits, one for each patch in
@@ -1834,7 +1834,7 @@ the original mailbox, with authorship and commit log message each
taken from the message containing each patch.
[[public-repositories]]
-Public git repositories
+Public Git repositories
-----------------------
Another way to submit changes to a project is to tell the maintainer
@@ -1909,7 +1909,7 @@ public repository. You can use scp, rsync, or whatever is most
convenient.
[[exporting-via-git]]
-Exporting a git repository via the git protocol
+Exporting a Git repository via the Git protocol
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This is the preferred method.
@@ -1922,7 +1922,7 @@ repository>>", below.
Otherwise, all you need to do is start linkgit:git-daemon[1]; it will
listen on port 9418. By default, it will allow access to any directory
-that looks like a git directory and contains the magic file
+that looks like a Git directory and contains the magic file
git-daemon-export-ok. Passing some directory paths as `git daemon`
arguments will further restrict the exports to those paths.
@@ -1931,13 +1931,13 @@ linkgit:git-daemon[1] man page for details. (See especially the
examples section.)
[[exporting-via-http]]
-Exporting a git repository via http
+Exporting a Git repository via http
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-The git protocol gives better performance and reliability, but on a
+The Git protocol gives better performance and reliability, but on a
host with a web server set up, http exports may be simpler to set up.
-All you need to do is place the newly created bare git repository in
+All you need to do is place the newly created bare Git repository in
a directory that is exported by the web server, and make some
adjustments to give web clients some extra information they need:
@@ -2073,9 +2073,9 @@ all push to and pull from a single shared repository. See
linkgit:gitcvs-migration[7] for instructions on how to
set this up.
-However, while there is nothing wrong with git's support for shared
+However, while there is nothing wrong with Git's support for shared
repositories, this mode of operation is not generally recommended,
-simply because the mode of collaboration that git supports--by
+simply because the mode of collaboration that Git supports--by
exchanging patches and pulling from public repositories--has so many
advantages over the central shared repository:
@@ -2099,8 +2099,8 @@ Allowing web browsing of a repository
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The gitweb cgi script provides users an easy way to browse your
-project's files and history without having to install git; see the file
-gitweb/INSTALL in the git source tree for instructions on setting it up.
+project's files and history without having to install Git; see the file
+gitweb/INSTALL in the Git source tree for instructions on setting it up.
[[sharing-development-examples]]
Examples
@@ -2110,7 +2110,7 @@ Examples
Maintaining topic branches for a Linux subsystem maintainer
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-This describes how Tony Luck uses git in his role as maintainer of the
+This describes how Tony Luck uses Git in his role as maintainer of the
IA64 architecture for the Linux kernel.
He uses two public branches:
@@ -2160,7 +2160,7 @@ $ git checkout release && git pull
Important note! If you have any local changes in these branches, then
this merge will create a commit object in the history (with no local
-changes git will simply do a "fast-forward" merge). Many people dislike
+changes Git will simply do a "fast-forward" merge). Many people dislike
the "noise" that this creates in the Linux history, so you should avoid
doing this capriciously in the "release" branch, as these noisy commits
will become part of the permanent history when you ask Linus to pull
@@ -2413,7 +2413,7 @@ Rewriting history and maintaining patch series
Normally commits are only added to a project, never taken away or
replaced. Git is designed with this assumption, and violating it will
-cause git's merge machinery (for example) to do the wrong thing.
+cause Git's merge machinery (for example) to do the wrong thing.
However, there is a situation in which it can be useful to violate this
assumption.
@@ -2524,7 +2524,7 @@ running `git commit`, just run
$ git rebase --continue
-------------------------------------------------
-and git will continue applying the rest of the patches.
+and Git will continue applying the rest of the patches.
At any point you may use the `--abort` option to abort this process and
return mywork to the state it had before you started the rebase:
@@ -2577,7 +2577,7 @@ then clean up with
$ git tag -d bad
-------------------------------------------------
-Note that the immutable nature of git history means that you haven't really
+Note that the immutable nature of Git history means that you haven't really
"modified" existing commits; instead, you have replaced the old commits with
new commits having new object names.
@@ -2658,7 +2658,7 @@ Git has no way of knowing that the new head is an updated version of
the old head; it treats this situation exactly the same as it would if
two developers had independently done the work on the old and new heads
in parallel. At this point, if someone attempts to merge the new head
-in to their branch, git will attempt to merge together the two (old and
+in to their branch, Git will attempt to merge together the two (old and
new) lines of development, instead of trying to replace the old by the
new. The results are likely to be unexpected.
@@ -2731,7 +2731,7 @@ linear history:
Bisecting between Z and D* would hit a single culprit commit Y*,
and understanding why Y* was broken would probably be easier.
-Partly for this reason, many experienced git users, even when
+Partly for this reason, many experienced Git users, even when
working on an otherwise merge-heavy project, keep the history
linear by rebasing against the latest upstream version before
publishing.
@@ -2752,8 +2752,8 @@ arbitrary name:
$ git fetch origin todo:my-todo-work
-------------------------------------------------
-The first argument, "origin", just tells git to fetch from the
-repository you originally cloned from. The second argument tells git
+The first argument, "origin", just tells Git to fetch from the
+repository you originally cloned from. The second argument tells Git
to fetch the branch named "todo" from the remote repository, and to
store it locally under the name refs/heads/my-todo-work.
@@ -2801,7 +2801,7 @@ resulting in a situation like:
In this case, "git fetch" will fail, and print out a warning.
-In that case, you can still force git to update to the new head, as
+In that case, you can still force Git to update to the new head, as
described in the following section. However, note that in the
situation above this may mean losing the commits labeled "a" and "b",
unless you've already created a reference of your own pointing to
@@ -2834,7 +2834,7 @@ Configuring remote-tracking branches
We saw above that "origin" is just a shortcut to refer to the
repository that you originally cloned from. This information is
-stored in git configuration variables, which you can see using
+stored in Git configuration variables, which you can see using
linkgit:git-config[1]:
-------------------------------------------------
@@ -2900,7 +2900,7 @@ Git concepts
Git is built on a small number of simple but powerful ideas. While it
is possible to get things done without understanding them, you will find
-git much more intuitive if you do.
+Git much more intuitive if you do.
We start with the most important, the <<def_object_database,object
database>> and the <<def_index,index>>.
@@ -2994,7 +2994,7 @@ As you can see, a commit is defined by:
Note that a commit does not itself contain any information about what
actually changed; all changes are calculated by comparing the contents
of the tree referred to by this commit with the trees associated with
-its parents. In particular, git does not attempt to record file renames
+its parents. In particular, Git does not attempt to record file renames
explicitly, though it can identify cases where the existence of the same
file data at changing paths suggests a rename. (See, for example, the
-M option to linkgit:git-diff[1]).
@@ -3033,14 +3033,14 @@ another tree, representing the contents of a subdirectory. Since trees
and blobs, like all other objects, are named by the SHA-1 hash of their
contents, two trees have the same SHA-1 name if and only if their
contents (including, recursively, the contents of all subdirectories)
-are identical. This allows git to quickly determine the differences
+are identical. This allows Git to quickly determine the differences
between two related tree objects, since it can ignore any entries with
identical object names.
(Note: in the presence of submodules, trees may also have commits as
entries. See <<submodules>> for documentation.)
-Note that the files all have mode 644 or 755: git actually only pays
+Note that the files all have mode 644 or 755: Git actually only pays
attention to the executable bit.
[[blob-object]]
@@ -3101,7 +3101,7 @@ sending out a single email that tells the people the name (SHA-1 hash)
of the top commit, and digitally sign that email using something
like GPG/PGP.
-To assist in this, git also provides the tag object...
+To assist in this, Git also provides the tag object...
[[tag-object]]
Tag Object
@@ -3134,7 +3134,7 @@ objects. (Note that linkgit:git-tag[1] can also be used to create
references whose names begin with "refs/tags/").
[[pack-files]]
-How git stores objects efficiently: pack files
+How Git stores objects efficiently: pack files
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Newly created objects are initially created in a file named after the
@@ -3152,7 +3152,7 @@ The first number is the number of objects which are kept in
individual files. The second is the amount of space taken up by
those "loose" objects.
-You can save space and make git faster by moving these loose objects in
+You can save space and make Git faster by moving these loose objects in
to a "pack file", which stores a group of objects in an efficient
compressed format; the details of how pack files are formatted can be
found in link:technical/pack-format.txt[technical/pack-format.txt].
@@ -3285,12 +3285,12 @@ repository is a *BAD* idea).
Recovering from repository corruption
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-By design, git treats data trusted to it with caution. However, even in
-the absence of bugs in git itself, it is still possible that hardware or
+By design, Git treats data trusted to it with caution. However, even in
+the absence of bugs in Git itself, it is still possible that hardware or
operating system errors could corrupt data.
The first defense against such problems is backups. You can back up a
-git directory using clone, or just using cp, tar, or any other backup
+Git directory using clone, or just using cp, tar, or any other backup
mechanism.
As a last resort, you can search for the corrupted objects and attempt
@@ -3396,7 +3396,7 @@ $ git log --raw --all
------------------------------------------------
and just looked for the sha of the missing object (4b9458b..) in that
-whole thing. It's up to you - git does *have* a lot of information, it is
+whole thing. It's up to you - Git does *have* a lot of information, it is
just missing one particular blob version.
[[the-index]]
@@ -3438,7 +3438,7 @@ It does this by storing some additional data for each entry (such as
the last modified time). This data is not displayed above, and is not
stored in the created tree object, but it can be used to determine
quickly which files in the working directory differ from what was
-stored in the index, and thus save git from having to read all of the
+stored in the index, and thus save Git from having to read all of the
data from such files to look for changes.
3. It can efficiently represent information about merge conflicts
@@ -3669,9 +3669,9 @@ Did you forget to 'git add'?
Unable to checkout '261dfac35cb99d380eb966e102c1197139f7fa24' in submodule path 'a'
-------------------------------------------------
-In older git versions it could be easily forgotten to commit new or modified
+In older Git versions it could be easily forgotten to commit new or modified
files in a submodule, which silently leads to similar problems as not pushing
-the submodule changes. Starting with git 1.7.0 both "git status" and "git diff"
+the submodule changes. Starting with Git 1.7.0 both "git status" and "git diff"
in the superproject show submodules as modified when they contain new or
modified files to protect against accidentally committing such a state. "git
diff" will also add a "-dirty" to the work tree side when generating patch
@@ -3714,12 +3714,12 @@ NOTE: The changes are still visible in the submodule's reflog.
This is not the case if you did not commit your changes.
[[low-level-operations]]
-Low-level git operations
+Low-level Git operations
========================
Many of the higher-level commands were originally implemented as shell
-scripts using a smaller core of low-level git commands. These can still
-be useful when doing unusual things with git, or just as a way to
+scripts using a smaller core of low-level Git commands. These can still
+be useful when doing unusual things with Git, or just as a way to
understand its inner workings.
[[object-manipulation]]
@@ -3750,7 +3750,7 @@ between the working tree, the index, and the object database. Git
provides low-level operations which perform each of these steps
individually.
-Generally, all "git" operations work on the index file. Some operations
+Generally, all Git operations work on the index file. Some operations
work *purely* on the index file (showing the current state of the
index), but most operations move data between the index file and either
the database or the working directory. Thus there are four main
@@ -3773,7 +3773,7 @@ but to avoid common mistakes with filename globbing etc, the command
will not normally add totally new entries or remove old entries,
i.e. it will normally just update existing cache entries.
-To tell git that yes, you really do realize that certain files no
+To tell Git that yes, you really do realize that certain files no
longer exist, or that new files should be added, you
should use the `--remove` and `--add` flags respectively.
@@ -3887,7 +3887,7 @@ redirection from a pipe or file, or by just typing it at the tty).
`git commit-tree` will return the name of the object that represents
that commit, and you should save it away for later use. Normally,
-you'd commit a new `HEAD` state, and while git doesn't care where you
+you'd commit a new `HEAD` state, and while Git doesn't care where you
save the note about that state, in practice we tend to just write the
result to the file pointed at by `.git/HEAD`, so that we can always see
what the last committed state was.
@@ -4044,7 +4044,7 @@ $ git ls-files --unmerged
Each line of the `git ls-files --unmerged` output begins with
the blob mode bits, blob SHA-1, 'stage number', and the
-filename. The 'stage number' is git's way to say which tree it
+filename. The 'stage number' is Git's way to say which tree it
came from: stage 1 corresponds to the `$orig` tree, stage 2 to
the `HEAD` tree, and stage 3 to the `$target` tree.
@@ -4056,7 +4056,7 @@ obviously the final outcome is what is in `HEAD`. What the
above example shows is that file `hello.c` was changed from
`$orig` to `HEAD` and `$orig` to `$target` in a different way.
You could resolve this by running your favorite 3-way merge
-program, e.g. `diff3`, `merge`, or git's own merge-file, on
+program, e.g. `diff3`, `merge`, or Git's own merge-file, on
the blob objects from these three stages yourself, like this:
------------------------------------------------
@@ -4068,7 +4068,7 @@ $ git merge-file hello.c~2 hello.c~1 hello.c~3
This would leave the merge result in `hello.c~2` file, along
with conflict markers if there are conflicts. After verifying
-the merge result makes sense, you can tell git what the final
+the merge result makes sense, you can tell Git what the final
merge result for this file is by:
-------------------------------------------------
@@ -4077,11 +4077,11 @@ $ git update-index hello.c
-------------------------------------------------
When a path is in the "unmerged" state, running `git update-index` for
-that path tells git to mark the path resolved.
+that path tells Git to mark the path resolved.
-The above is the description of a git merge at the lowest level,
+The above is the description of a Git merge at the lowest level,
to help you understand what conceptually happens under the hood.
-In practice, nobody, not even git itself, runs `git cat-file` three times
+In practice, nobody, not even Git itself, runs `git cat-file` three times
for this. There is a `git merge-index` program that extracts the
stages to temporary files and calls a "merge" script on it:
@@ -4092,11 +4092,11 @@ $ git merge-index git-merge-one-file hello.c
and that is what higher level `git merge -s resolve` is implemented with.
[[hacking-git]]
-Hacking git
+Hacking Git
===========
-This chapter covers internal details of the git implementation which
-probably only git developers need to understand.
+This chapter covers internal details of the Git implementation which
+probably only Git developers need to understand.
[[object-details]]
Object storage format
@@ -4114,7 +4114,7 @@ about the data in the object. It's worth noting that the SHA-1 hash
that is used to name the object is the hash of the original data
plus this header, so `sha1sum` 'file' does not match the object name
for 'file'.
-(Historical note: in the dawn of the age of git the hash
+(Historical note: in the dawn of the age of Git the hash
was the SHA-1 of the 'compressed' object.)
As a result, the general consistency of an object can always be tested
@@ -4144,7 +4144,7 @@ A good place to start is with the contents of the initial commit, with:
$ git checkout e83c5163
----------------------------------------------------
-The initial revision lays the foundation for almost everything git has
+The initial revision lays the foundation for almost everything Git has
today, but is small enough to read in one sitting.
Note that terminology has changed since that revision. For example, the
@@ -4298,7 +4298,7 @@ Now, for the meat:
This is how you read a blob (actually, not only a blob, but any type of
object). To know how the function `read_object_with_reference()` actually
works, find the source code for it (something like `git grep
-read_object_with | grep ":[a-z]"` in the git repository), and read
+read_object_with | grep ":[a-z]"` in the Git repository), and read
the source.
To find out how the result can be used, just read on in `cmd_cat_file()`:
@@ -4479,7 +4479,7 @@ $ git bisect bad # if this revision is bad.
Making changes
--------------
-Make sure git knows who to blame:
+Make sure Git knows who to blame:
------------------------------------------------
$ cat >>~/.gitconfig <<\EOF
@@ -4529,7 +4529,7 @@ $ git format-patch origin..HEAD # format a patch for each commit
$ git am mbox # import patches from the mailbox "mbox"
-----------------------------------------------
-Fetch a branch in a different git repository, then merge into the
+Fetch a branch in a different Git repository, then merge into the
current branch:
-----------------------------------------------
@@ -4590,7 +4590,7 @@ The basic requirements:
- It must be readable in order, from beginning to end, by someone
intelligent with a basic grasp of the UNIX command line, but without
- any special knowledge of git. If necessary, any other prerequisites
+ any special knowledge of Git. If necessary, any other prerequisites
should be specifically mentioned as they arise.
- Whenever possible, section headings should clearly describe the task
they explain how to do, in language that requires no more knowledge